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#1
SouthernCross

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I've enjoyed reading the postings on this forum for the last year or so. Just recently joined up and hope to be able to contribute. I work as a Geomatics Specialist and Cartographer for an environmental firm and have also freelanced for the Royal Ontario Museum.

Cartographers seem to be a rare breed. Its nice to have a place where our species can flourish.
W.P.
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#2
frax

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Hi and welcome! Are you an aussie in Canada? - I am referring to your nickname on the board.
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#3
SouthernCross

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Hi and welcome! Are you an aussie in Canada? - I am referring to your nickname on the board.


Hello Frax,

No, I'm not an aussie. My nickname stems from my penchance for southern islands and the fact that I've been a parrothead all my life (Jimmy Buffett fan)!
W.P.
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#4
Kathi

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I like your signature, it reminds me of my three field summers (2000-2002) that I spent in the Arctic, working on a mapping project for the Geological Survey of Canada in Central Baffin Island. Our field area extended from 68 to 70 degrees N, but some of our air photo coverage went further north. So the chief drew a line on them to indicate how far we had to go. And one evening one of my colleagues had written "Hic sunt leones" on the northern part of his photo... We had a great laugh! :D

Say "Hi!" to the lions for me! And welcome at CartoTalk.
Cheers,

Kathi

#5
SouthernCross

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Hello Kathi. Nice to pseudo-meet you. I'll try and say hello to the lions when I see them, though I'm still wondering where they are...
W.P.
"Hic sunt leones"
www.neagis.com

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DaveB

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Hello Kathi. Nice to pseudo-meet you. I'll try and say hello to the lions when I see them, though I'm still wondering where they are...

Maybe they are sea lions? Or polar lions (there are polar bears, why not polar lions)?
But most likely they are just imaginary lions on the map, with no corresponding lions on the ground... B)
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#7
SouthernCross

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Maybe they are sea lions? Or polar lions (there are polar bears, why not polar lions)?
But most likely they are just imaginary lions on the map, with no corresponding lions on the ground... B)


Or even a ligar. Maybe it should read Hic sunt ligres... I guess pretty much anything could be laying there and it would be an accurate statement, so yes, the lions are most likely imaginary!

However, it doesn't stop Bruce Cockburn from wondering where they are!

Hello to everyone. My specialty revolves around GIS and the environmental private sector. I've been looking through all the wonderful maps produced by NACIS members and am very impressed. There is a lot of talent out there!

I apologize for the pig latin but unfortunately I don't believe that the word "ligers" has an actual literal latin translation. I did put in the proper genative though!
W.P.
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www.neagis.com

#8
DaveB

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I should've said they're like graticules, they are imaginary lions on the map... :P

And welcome! :)
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#9
Kathi

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Though the lions could well be imaginary, there are all sorts of things that can happen to you if you venture further north than 70 degrees! (Although you can probably say that for any latitude or longitude in certain respects... :P ) When working near 70 degrees, it seemed to us that the weather was always worse forther north...

Or you could take a wrong turn and fall off the edge of your air photo. Then you end up sitting somewhere in the middle of nowhere with no idea where you are in relation to the spot where the helicopter's supposed to pick you up in the evening. Not a good feeling, but thanks to walky-talkies we managed to always pick up everyone and bring them back to camp.

We never saw any lions, and polar bears usually don't venture that far inland. But when you're out there on your own, you start hearing and seeing things. The flapping of your clothes in the wind sounds like the helicopter approaching, a few white boulders on the horizon look like a herd of caribou. And after weeks and months in a small camp you start getting weird ideas. So there could be anything out there, with lions being one of the rather more pleasant varieties. What about serpents, basilisks, dragons or similar monsters? :blink:
Cheers,

Kathi

#10
SouthernCross

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So there could be anything out there, with lions being one of the rather more pleasant varieties. What about serpents, basilisks, dragons or similar monsters? :blink:


Well..... for starters, serpents and basilisks prefer warmer temperatures and I saw a National Geographic special saying that dragons tend to migrate towards mountainous regions (now that would be a good cartography project... depicting the annual migration routes of dragons)...

We are still left with the trusty old sea monster.... you know the one I'm talking about. The one that's drawn in cruising the Beaufort.

I'm curious at what type of project you were working on Kathi!?
W.P.
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www.neagis.com

#11
Kathi

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We are still left with the trusty old sea monster.... you know the one I'm talking about. The one that's drawn in cruising the Beaufort.

I'm curious at what type of project you were working on Kathi!?


I was actually thinking about a Loch-Ness-type of creature that could be living in the fjords. Or some yet undescribed relative of Yeti living in the arctic snow.... :D

The project I worked for was a organized, staffed and paid for by the Geological Survey of Canada. There had been some rudimentary geological mapping in the area that was done in the 1950ies and 60ies, but noone had so far taken a detailed look at the rocks. So the Geological Survey organizes several such projects per year (some smaller with maybe 5 geologists, and usually one or two of our size with some 15 geologists and often several geophysicists, archeologists etc. involved) to investigate certain areas in more detail both from a purely scientific point of view as well as with regards to future exploration for mineral resources.

As stated previously, we worked in Central Baffin Island, mapping the northern edge of the so called Trans-Hudson orogen, a mountain range that used to stretch from what is now Greenland through Hudson bay into Manitoba and Wyoming. Of course the mountains are long gone, but as a geologist we can still trace them, similar to an archeologist who sees bits of old walls and deducts what kind of settlement there once stood.

We spent three field summers in the arctic, mapping some 50'000 km2 (on foot!) at 1:100'000. Well, the finished maps are 1:100'000, the air photos we used as base maps are roughly 1:50'000 in the center and more and more distorted towards the edge. We, that's 12-15 bedrock geologists, looking at the old Trans Hudson orogen structures, 3 glaciologists investigating Barnes Ice Cap, a remnant of the large laurentian ice shield that reached down to the Great Lakes during the last ice age, 4 quaternary geologists investigating other remnants of the ice ages, three small teams of geophysicists doing different experiments, an archeologist/science journalist looking at sites of the Inuit, two cooks, two helicopter pilots and their engineer. Quite a crowd, really! Most of the geologists were students of different Canadian universities doing their Bachelor, Master or Ph. D. Thesis in relation to the project (like myself).

Our final product - apart from scientific papers and theses - was a detailed geological map of the area (in paper and digital formats) that provided exploration companies with the geological base maps they needed to define their areas of investigation for mineral exploration. In the second and third summers we had several companies setting up camps within our area.

For me the project was my first real contact with GIS, which later led me into cartography and to the job I'm presently at where I can do both Geology and GIS work. And it was a fantastic experience to work and live in such a setting. I'd take up any opportunity to do this again!!

Well, enough chatting for now! ;) Wish you all the best, especially no encounters with any kind of monsters near the edges of the map!
Cheers,

Kathi

#12
DaveB

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What a cool (no pun intended) project and experience, Kathi!

3 glaciologists investigating Barnes Ice Cap,

For some reason this bit caught my eye... ;)

edit: fixed typo :P
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#13
SouthernCross

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How many glaciologists does it take to screw in a light bulb....

Just kidding! :P

Sounds like a very interesting job Kathi. I'd love to go to the arctic. Alas the closest thing I have at the moment is TerraMetrics terrain dataset to play with. One day, me, my cameras, and my trusty trimble will make the trek.
W.P.
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#14
Kathi

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For some reason this vit caught my eye... ;)

:huh: Hm, I wonder why.... :D

It was indeed very cool, though not necessarily temperature-wise: Our field season started in mid-June which is the beginning of spring up there, with most lakes still frozen and snow fields on the ground. Then the ice breaks up, and in a matter of days the whole scenery turns from black-bronish-white-turquoise to green with lots of colourful flowers. In July - if there isn't too much wind - temperatures can reach 25 degrees Celsius or more, and the only reason for not working in shorts are the mosquitoes... I even went swimming in some of the shallow lakes and ponds, and it was quite pleasant. But if the weather turns bad, it snows, even in July and August. Then by August you start getting blueberries and fall colours. And by the end of August we packed up camp and left, for the first snow in September might well stick around for weeks or months.

I don't know about the lighbulbs, by the way. We had midnight sun and 24 hours of daylight, so there was no need for any lightbulbs. (In fact, one of the geophysics teams used solar panels to load the batteries of their gear during the "night", which, apparently, led to some puzzled looks when they discussed the proposal before their field season with people at the Geological Survey in Ottawa.)
Cheers,

Kathi




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