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#1
Francis S.

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I'm trying to get an idea of the useful map scale ranges for various outdoor recreation activities; in other words, what scale (or scale range in particular) is usable for each particular activity. The activities are:

ATV
Backpacking
Biking (Mountain)
Biking (Road)
Bird-Watching
Canoeing
Downhill Skiing
Driving (sightseeing)
Fishing
Fossil Hunting
Hiking
Horseback Riding
Hunting
Jeeping
Kayaking
Motor-Boating
Orienteering
Rafting
Rock Climbing
Rowing
Sailing
Snowboarding
Snowmobiling
Snowshoeing
Viewing Scenery
Walking
Walking (accessible)
Windsurfing
XC Skiing

The scales could range from 1:12000 to 1:200000 (and beyond). For example, hiking might run from 1:25000- 1:50,000 and be generally useful.

I'd appreciate any scale ranges you might contribute to the list above. (or any more activities for that matter)

Thanks!
Francis Stanton
Eagle Eye Maps

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http://www.eagleeyemaps.com

#2
razornole

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I'm trying to get an idea of the useful map scale ranges for various outdoor recreation activities; in other words, what scale (or scale range in particular) is usable for each particular activity. The activities are:

ATV
Backpacking
Biking (Mountain)
Biking (Road)
Bird-Watching
Canoeing
Downhill Skiing
Driving (sightseeing)
Fishing
Fossil Hunting
Hiking
Horseback Riding
Hunting
Jeeping
Kayaking
Motor-Boating
Orienteering
Rafting
Rock Climbing
Rowing
Sailing
Snowboarding
Snowmobiling
Snowshoeing
Viewing Scenery
Walking
Walking (accessible)
Windsurfing
XC Skiing

The scales could range from 1:12000 to 1:200000 (and beyond). For example, hiking might run from 1:25000- 1:50,000 and be generally useful.

I'd appreciate any scale ranges you might contribute to the list above. (or any more activities for that matter)

Thanks!


Hello Francis,

I'm just not sure what you are asking. I would think that scale would be dependent on the geographical area you are mapping coupled with print, size, and price limitations.

Are these for dynamic or static maps?

I can't tell you the exact scales that I have used successfully for certain activities, but I can tell you the maps I have used.

Backpacking/hiking, mountain biking, canoeing, rafting, kayaking = Trails Illustrated (range from 1:100000-1:35000)
Birdwatching, viewing scenery, walking, road biking, motor biking, jeeping, driving, ATV = DeLorme (I have also used maps produced by state/national parks for some these activities as well).

Overall, I make my maps as large of scale as possible.

Hope that helps,
kru
"Ah, to see the world with the eyes of the gods is geography--to know cities and tribes, mountains and rivers, earth and sea, this is our gift."
Strabo 22AD

#3
Francis S.

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Hello Francis,

I'm just not sure what you are asking. I would think that scale would be dependent on the geographical area you are mapping coupled with print, size, and price limitations.

Are these for dynamic or static maps?

I can't tell you the exact scales that I have used successfully for certain activities, but I can tell you the maps I have used.

Backpacking/hiking, mountain biking, canoeing, rafting, kayaking = Trails Illustrated (range from 1:100000-1:35000)
Birdwatching, viewing scenery, walking, road biking, motor biking, jeeping, driving, ATV = DeLorme (I have also used maps produced by state/national parks for some these activities as well).

Overall, I make my maps as large of scale as possible.

Hope that helps,
kru


Thanks for your input. What I'm trying to do is get a sense of each activity's scale needs before I design the map with regard to the coverage, print or viewer size, and price considerations - just an early step in the design process. Probably more relevant to static print maps including PDFs. Also the comparative scale info is useful for trying to combine various recreational activities on one map - what is the best compromise scale?

So here is my initial stab at the list:
1:25000 - 1:100000 ATV
1:25000 - 1:50000 Backpacking
1:25000 - 1:100000 Biking (Mountain)
1:50000 - 1:200000 Biking (Road)
1:12500 - 1:25000 Bird-Watching
1:12500 - 1:50000 Canoeing
1:12500 - 1:50000 Downhill Skiing (backcountry)
1:150000 - 1:200000+ Driving (sightseeing)
1:25000 - 1:100000 Fishing
1:12500 - 1:25000 Fossil Hunting
1:25000 - 1:50000 Hiking
1:25000 - 1:100000 Horseback Riding
1:25000 - 1:100000 Hunting
1:25000 - 1:150000 Jeeping
1:12500 - 1:50000 Kayaking
1:25000 - 1:100000 Motor-Boating
1:5000 - 1:25000 Orienteering
1:25000 - 1:50000 Rafting
1:5000 - 1:25000 Rock Climbing
1:5000 - 1:25000 Rowing
1:25000 - 1:100000 Sailing
1:12500 - 1:50000 Snowboarding
1:25000 - 1:100000 Snowmobiling
1:12500 - 1:25000 Snowshoeing
1:25000 - 1:200000 Viewing Scenery
1:12500 - 1:25000 Walking
1:5000 - 1:15000 Walking (accessible)
1:12500 - 1:50000 Windsurfing
1:12500 - 1:50000 XC Skiing
(couldn't figure out if there were tabs!)

Any opinions are welcome!
Francis Stanton
Eagle Eye Maps

eagleeye@chorus.net
http://www.eagleeyemaps.com

#4
David Medeiros

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You may be putting a little too much thought into this. Scale is dictated not by the mapped activity so much as a host of variables including activity. Locking yourself into a scale (or even a scale range) at the outset by map activity description could cause more work down the line.

Kru mentions the key factors (area mapped, page size, cost of printing). And the recommendation to get the largest scale possible for each map is spot on for most uses. If the map is to be part of a series though you should look at the range of extents and come up with a single best scale that fits them all or a limited number of scale ranges to cover the upper and lower ends.

As for the list, I really think you could group those up a bit, or generalize by activity type and extent: "on foot, large area"; "on foot small area" instead of hiking, walking, hunting, fishing, backpacking etc.

GIS Reference and Instruction Specialist, Stanford Geospatial Center.

 

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#5
razornole

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Hello Francis,

I'm just not sure what you are asking. I would think that scale would be dependent on the geographical area you are mapping coupled with print, size, and price limitations.

Are these for dynamic or static maps?

I can't tell you the exact scales that I have used successfully for certain activities, but I can tell you the maps I have used.

Backpacking/hiking, mountain biking, canoeing, rafting, kayaking = Trails Illustrated (range from 1:100000-1:35000)
Birdwatching, viewing scenery, walking, road biking, motor biking, jeeping, driving, ATV = DeLorme (I have also used maps produced by state/national parks for some these activities as well).

Overall, I make my maps as large of scale as possible.

Hope that helps,
kru


Thanks for your input. What I'm trying to do is get a sense of each activity's scale needs before I design the map with regard to the coverage, print or viewer size, and price considerations - just an early step in the design process. Probably more relevant to static print maps including PDFs. Also the comparative scale info is useful for trying to combine various recreational activities on one map - what is the best compromise scale?

So here is my initial stab at the list:
1:25000 - 1:100000 ATV
1:25000 - 1:50000 Backpacking
1:25000 - 1:100000 Biking (Mountain)
1:50000 - 1:200000 Biking (Road)
1:12500 - 1:25000 Bird-Watching
1:12500 - 1:50000 Canoeing
1:12500 - 1:50000 Downhill Skiing (backcountry)
1:150000 - 1:200000+ Driving (sightseeing)
1:25000 - 1:100000 Fishing
1:12500 - 1:25000 Fossil Hunting
1:25000 - 1:50000 Hiking
1:25000 - 1:100000 Horseback Riding
1:25000 - 1:100000 Hunting
1:25000 - 1:150000 Jeeping
1:12500 - 1:50000 Kayaking
1:25000 - 1:100000 Motor-Boating
1:5000 - 1:25000 Orienteering
1:25000 - 1:50000 Rafting
1:5000 - 1:25000 Rock Climbing
1:5000 - 1:25000 Rowing
1:25000 - 1:100000 Sailing
1:12500 - 1:50000 Snowboarding
1:25000 - 1:100000 Snowmobiling
1:12500 - 1:25000 Snowshoeing
1:25000 - 1:200000 Viewing Scenery
1:12500 - 1:25000 Walking
1:5000 - 1:15000 Walking (accessible)
1:12500 - 1:50000 Windsurfing
1:12500 - 1:50000 XC Skiing
(couldn't figure out if there were tabs!)

Any opinions are welcome!


I think that I understand your inquisition. However, to try to quantify you activity can dangerous w/o taking into account your area. Could you make me a printed XC skiing map of Yellowstone National Park at 1:12500 or even 1:50000? I suppose it could be done in a series of maps, but then you are talking price and weight. Who is going to buy and carry 2 maps b/c they are skiing in an area where the maps overlap (other then myself)?

I might hold a bit of prejudice, but look at your target audience. If I'm hiking (with a pack or not) I might want to know the lay of the land a lot better then if I am driving a jeep. A 5% incline means a lot when done on foot. Same could be said with boats, if I have to navigate a class III rapid in a canoe, I want to know whats ahead. If I am motorboating all I care about is where is the dam(n) or cove.

kru
"Ah, to see the world with the eyes of the gods is geography--to know cities and tribes, mountains and rivers, earth and sea, this is our gift."
Strabo 22AD

#6
mikerouge

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It would be very interesting to see how the typical scale range for certain activities relates to the 'speed' of users in each. For example, it's generally thought that a cyclist would prefer a 1:100k whereas a walker would prefer 1:25k or 1:50k.

It also depends on how long their trips are. A short walk - the larger the scale the better. A 3 day expedition - you'd probably be willing to sacrifice detail for getting a bigger area onto a single sheet.

So perhaps you could multiply speed of method by duration of trip to come up with some kind of distance or areal coverage figure. This could then define what scale is required to fit the appropriate area onto one sheet.

But there's plenty of evidence out there - go and read some manuals for the sports your mention, you're bound to find examples of maps for each. That will give you a clue.

I'm sure there's a pattern there, and I'm sure it's related to speed, time and hence distance

#7
Dale Sanderson

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Could you make me a printed XC skiing map of Yellowstone National Park at 1:12500 or even 1:50000?

Maybe that's his point: yes, it would require several sheets to cover Yellowstone at 1:50k, but if you're doing some serious XC skiing, would you even want a map at a scale any smaller than that? So if he gets a client who wants a XC map of Yellowstone that will fit on a letter-size piece of paper, he can point to the list and say, no, that's really outside the necessary scale range for that type of map.

I'll take a stab at some of these: I know from experience that 1:50k is as small as I'd want to go for backpacking, but in most cases you wouldn't need any larger than 1:12k. So by extension, I'm going to say that would also be the range for similar on-foot outdoor activities, such as birdwatching, backcountry skiing, hiking, snowshoeing, walking, and XC skiing.
Dale Sanderson
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personally: cartophile and road-geek (my website)

#8
David Medeiros

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I'll take a stab at some of these: I know from experience that 1:50k is as small as I'd want to go for backpacking, but in most cases you wouldn't need any larger than 1:12k. So by extension, I'm going to say that would also be the range for similar on-foot outdoor activities, such as birdwatching, backcountry skiing, hiking, snowshoeing, walking, and XC skiing.


That was partially my point... he needs to look at grouping like activities together. An exhaustive list like this probably seems like a good idea to someone who hasn't done a lot of work yet but I think it can actually be crippling in terms of allowing you to think independently about each job as it comes. Having a basic guideline by activity group is great but I would stop there and let the details of the job influence your scale and style decisions, not a hard table of specific activities and their "best" scales.

GIS Reference and Instruction Specialist, Stanford Geospatial Center.

 

www.mapbliss.com

 


#9
Francis S.

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Good points all around. The reason I didn’t try and categorize the list was that the activities could be broken down in at least a couple of ways:

By Type of Activity:
Done on Foot: Backpacking, Hiking, Horseback Riding, Orienteering, Rock Climbing, Walking, Walking (accessible)
Done on a Bicycle: Biking (Mountain), Biking (Road)
Done in a Boat: Canoeing, Kayaking, Motor-Boating, Rafting, Rowing, Sailing, Windsurfing
Done on Foot in Snow: Downhill Skiing (backcountry), Snowboarding, Snowshoeing, XC Skiing
Done in a Motorized Vehicle: ATV, Driving (sightseeing), Jeeping, Snowmobiling
Misc: Bird-Watching, Fishing, Fossil Hunting, Hunting, Viewing Scenery

or

By Relative Speed/Distance:
Slow: Backpacking, Bird-Watching, Canoeing, Fishing, Fossil Hunting, Hiking, Hunting, Orienteering, Rock Climbing, Rowing, Snowshoeing, Walking, Walking (accessible), XC Skiing
Medium: Biking (Mountain), Biking (Road), Downhill Skiing (backcountry), Horseback Riding, Jeeping, Kayaking, Rafting, Sailing, Snowboarding, Viewing Scenery, Windsurfing
Fast: ATV, Driving (sightseeing), Motor-Boating, Snowmobiling,

and I wanted each activity to be judged on it’s own. Obviously some will categorize differently.

I’ve done a fair number of recreation maps over the years (biking, XC, downhill, hiking, etc.) and am working on a job which is centered more on multiple activities rather than just one activity, so I’d thought I try and generate a consensus amongst the CartoTalkers. Again, it’s not the “best” scale, just a usable range, and more importantly it’s some basic research to help a make a decision along with all the other usual map design factors. Thanks to those for helping to fill in the blanks!

(for some reason, the text entry and formatting is acting strangely in the reply box - hope this comes through)
Francis Stanton
Eagle Eye Maps

eagleeye@chorus.net
http://www.eagleeyemaps.com




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