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Archaeological Site Maps and Advice Needed

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#1
Irvin Feliciano

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Greetings,

My name is Irvin Feliciano Santiago and here I post some basic archaeological sites maps that I’m working on. The following maps are required for some electrical route project crossing most the Island of Puerto Rico. In order for the agency to start develop the project they need to be sure what possible archaeological resource they can impact. For that reason the specific site location around the proposed route considering a buffer distance is the main topic of these maps. On those maps, I know the size symbol of the arch-site are not the best [in fact I corrected on municipality site-map], also I was asked to do a soil map, in where I get stuck to the dilemma of how to do it?. I was thinking on using the soil taxonomy classes but then I realize that it was too much for a classification using unique class’s method. After such realization, I was thinking on using MLRA [Mayor Land Resource Areas] information on USGS generic soil info [SATSURGO] in order to split the areas of the SSURGO soil info with a spatial intersect tools Arc GIS 9.2 and then be able to use different color palates depending on what MLRA they are. But then again as the project comprise a large extent area I know it will take some time to query the database and assemble all the info for Arc GIS 9.2 to start the generation of Soil Maps in such way. In fact, what they want to know on those soil maps are what kind of soils intersect with the route. I was thinking that for each soils map section I generate, I can include a reference table of unique soil information comprised by the soils that intersects the project so they can put in the appendix of the report and use it for further information regarding the visual exploration of the maps. But again, that will require me to do some SQL query and make those tables. I have been like 3 weeks working on that, and I have 11 maps of soils and arch-site, 11 for the route, buffer and sites and 14 municipalities’ site-maps [the maps do not have names in order to let the archaeologist to play with it as they fit.] If some one has any advice on how to improve those maps please let me know. One of my main concerns is how much I will charge for this? I’m just new on freelance-cartography and this is my first professional work after my graduation on Geo-Informatics. I was thinking on 700$ o 600$ but I’m not sure if that is too much or is too cheap. By the way, they tell me now they change the route and they will need an update of such maps. Any ideas?


Regards,
Irvin T. Feliciano Santiago

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#2
Hans van der Maarel

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Hello Irvin,

If the price you mention is for the entire project (36 maps), it's very low. It's hard to say what would be a more reasonable price, it depends on the source data.

However, if the client wants to change fundamental things, such as the route, once the maps have already been produced, that's definately going to be an extra cost thing.

As for the maps, I'd like to see a slightly larger version if that's possible, so that I can actually read the text.
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#3
Irvin Feliciano

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Hi Hans van der Maarel,

Thanks for the replay. Here i send you PDF with a simple map.

Regards,
Irvin

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  • Attached File  A1.pdf   744.72KB   79 downloads


#4
Teeds

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Irvin:

I would agree with Hans on the price being too low ... more accurately WAY too low. Looking at the hours invested, you will not even make a dollar an hour for the work produced to date based upon the three weeks ALREADY invested.

I am an architect by trade rather than a full time cartographer, but I likely figure hours and value in a similar manner.

Take the number of maps you have to produce, multiply it by the number of hours you anticipate for each map, and multiply that by the hourly wage you want to make. Now, that is the LABOR part of the equation.

Multiply LABOR by some factor to cover OVERHEAD (computer, software, data purchased, office rent, healthcare, you name it) and then add a percentage on top of that for PROFIT.

In my case my overhead factor is 1.85 times labor and my intended profit margin is 20% for my work.

This would make $1.00 in labor cost worth $3.42 to my client ...

Labor - $1.00
Overhead - $1.00 x 1.85 = $1.85
Subtotal - $2.85
Profit - $2.85 x 20% = $0.57
Total - $3.42

Does that make sense?

This still doesn't guarantee that you will make a profit on your work, but it is a start.

Also to echo Hans ... all tweaking is EXTRA and you should get paid for it.

Also ... nice legible product you have created.

Tony
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#5
Irvin Feliciano

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Irvin:

I would agree with Hans on the price being too low ... more accurately WAY too low. Looking at the hours invested, you will not even make a dollar an hour for the work produced to date based upon the three weeks ALREADY invested.

I am an architect by trade rather than a full time cartographer, but I likely figure hours and value in a similar manner.

Take the number of maps you have to produce, multiply it by the number of hours you anticipate for each map, and multiply that by the hourly wage you want to make. Now, that is the LABOR part of the equation.

Multiply LABOR by some factor to cover OVERHEAD (computer, software, data purchased, office rent, healthcare, you name it) and then add a percentage on top of that for PROFIT.

In my case my overhead factor is 1.85 times labor and my intended profit margin is 20% for my work.

This would make $1.00 in labor cost worth $3.42 to my client ...

Labor - $1.00
Overhead - $1.00 x 1.85 = $1.85
Subtotal - $2.85
Profit - $2.85 x 20% = $0.57
Total - $3.42

Does that make sense?

This still doesn't guarantee that you will make a profit on your work, but it is a start.

Also to echo Hans ... all tweaking is EXTRA and you should get paid for it.

Also ... nice legible product you have created.

Tony


Thanks,

I will look for those numbers that you just told me, sure makes sense.

Regards,
Irvin T. Feliciano Santiago

#6
François Goulet

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Labor - $1.00
Overhead - $1.00 x 1.85 = $1.85
Subtotal - $2.85
Profit - $2.85 x 20% = $0.57
Total - $3.42

Does that make sense?


It's all depend of your starting labor cost. I've read an article (can't find it) once by a guy hired by companies to evaluate the cost of consultants/freelancers and he said that the overhead should be at least 1.8 (and you go up as you gain experience) if you want to make any money, but it was a "multiplicator" of the labor cost (it's not added), so an overhead of 1.85 should give you a subtotal of 1.85, instead of 2.85. In this system, your overhead is 2.85 which is kind of high (but hey, if client want to pay, I would not complain). It's like to say that for each 100$ you earn, it cost you 185$ to make it. Also, is the profit margin for the company? As a freelancer, your hourly rate is your salary so there is your profit. Adding another 20% is like giving yourself a 57% raise (based on your 1$ labor cost and 0.57$ of profit).

In Quebec, someone in the cartographic/design field can easily make 25$/hour so with your system, to make that as a freelancer, I'd have to charge 85.5$/hour? Maybe you are right and my client had a super deal with me ;) So for a 4 hour job, if I want to have 25$/hour (then a 100$ labor cost), I should charge 342$ ? I'm not criticizing, just trying to understand your system.

I have a similar system though and even though I don't do a lot of freelance work, I've always found that I was paid rightly for the effort and work I've done.

In my day job, we have a 2.35 increase (our clients pay 2.35 times my salary), way less than 2.85.

#7
orlon

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Dear Irvin,

is the scale indicated on the maps the final one? I mean, you (they) just need an idea about the possible impact on archaeological sites or you (they) want a more accurate survey? Furthermore, haven't those sites got an official "borderline" (whether real or imaginary) once they got nominated?

Usually, regarding such projects, the main map is being followed by a series of big-scale topographic ones, thus letting the engineers of the constructor know about precise dimensioning and limits... And, on such maps, the monuments and/or sites are usually displayed topographically, according of course to the scale factor. A bullet indicating a monument is only "allowed" on a very small-scale map, just ofr a general view and not for measuring issues..

In similar cases, we (archaeologists in Greece) are given an official map by the constructor, indicating the proposed route and then we provide them with the survey points of each of the sites within our territorial responsibility, and make our suggestions according to the legislation. Those survey points finally lead to the drawing of a new map series, combing all those elements (just like in your case) and get submitted again for approval.

I'm telling you all this, just to raise issues of responsibility, in case something goes wrong regarding the monuments...

As for the main issue, I do agree, those are EXTREMELY LOW PRICES! (for God's sake...)

Keep the good work.

-orlon

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