Jump to content

 
Photo

New Apeldoorn city map

- - - - -

  • Please log in to reply
17 replies to this topic

#1
Hans van der Maarel

Hans van der Maarel

    CartoTalk Editor-in-Chief

  • Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,898 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:The Netherlands
  • Interests:Cartography, GIS, history, popular science, music.
  • Netherlands

I'm in the process of finishing up a new city map for Apeldoorn, The Netherlands. This is going to be a 1:5000 scale map (previous maps I've done for them are in the 1:15000 range) and consequently we wanted to add more information to it. Specifically, for every building I wanted to show the use of that building. The process of getting and classifying the data has been described in this thread

So here's a first preliminary sample:
Attached File  Screen_shot_2010_05_26_at_15.29.51.png   615.35KB   325 downloads

In order to cope with one building having more uses, I've decided to color it according to the most important use (i.e. most often occuring within that building) with an additional dot for the 2nd most important use. Text placement is still ongoing, these texts were copied from the existing map and scaled up.
Hans van der Maarel - Cartotalk Editor
Red Geographics
Email: hans@redgeographics.com / Twitter: @redgeographics

#2
Charles Syrett

Charles Syrett

    Ultimate Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 537 posts
  • Canada

Interesting to compare this with your smaller scale Apeldoorn map. A few things:

1. Any reason why you have colour in the streets? I would think that leaving them white, as you did on the other map, would place them onto a different visual plane from the buildings.
2. The icons work well on the smaller scale map, but on this one, I find that the "filled" icons (such as the church icon) are confusing against the buildings, which are also colour blocks. The library icon, on the other hand, is more of a "line" icon and contrasts well with the buildings.
3. The street names look a little large and chunky -- but then again you mentioned you're still working on the labels. :) (I'm curious -- will there be building names or addresses?)

Looking forward to the next draft!

Charles Syrett
Map Graphics
http://www.mapgraphics.com

#3
Hans van der Maarel

Hans van der Maarel

    CartoTalk Editor-in-Chief

  • Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,898 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:The Netherlands
  • Interests:Cartography, GIS, history, popular science, music.
  • Netherlands

Thanks Charles.

1: White is certainly an option now that you've mentioned it, but we've never considered it in this particular case. We felt that keeping a very subtle color would eventually lead to a more 'relaxed' view. In addition to that, we want the whole thing to be stylistically tied to the existing 1:15000 map.

2: Symbols also came from the original map, I don't think we'll be making any radical changes to those (though we are considering a new school symbol). I do think they could stand to be shrunken a bit, which should alleviate some of the problems.

3: No addresses are planned right now, but we could consider adding the house numbers at the start and end of every block. Important buildings (e.g. "Stadhuis" and "Raadhuis" in this view) are named.

The thing with the colors is that they're coming from the tax assessment database, which has the use per address. However... in some cases several buildings (e.g. a school) might share the same address, but there'd only be one address point so only one building with a function. There might be one like that top left, where there's a green and a grey building, I think both are part of the same school complex. The symbols, as I mentioned, came from the original map and were added in based on what official data we could find. Those two might not be in agreement with eachother. Data quality is a very big issue in this case, it won't be visible to a casual observer, but I know the problems are there.
Hans van der Maarel - Cartotalk Editor
Red Geographics
Email: hans@redgeographics.com / Twitter: @redgeographics

#4
Dennis McClendon

Dennis McClendon

    Hall of Fame

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,084 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Chicago
  • Interests:map design, large-scale maps of cities
  • United States

I agree that white or almost-white streets would be worth looking at. Something that's just a bare ghost of your ground green, maybe C3 M0 Y6 K0 might also work.

What are the long gray bubbles along the sidewalks in Kerklaan and also in the -laan whose south end is at Deventerstraat?

The dot idea is a good one, though the dots look a bit small. At the display scale, many of them appear to be the same color as the buildings.
Dennis McClendon, Chicago CartoGraphics
chicagocarto.com

#5
Charles Syrett

Charles Syrett

    Ultimate Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 537 posts
  • Canada

The thing with the colors is that they're coming from the tax assessment database, which has the use per address. However... in some cases several buildings (e.g. a school) might share the same address, but there'd only be one address point so only one building with a function. There might be one like that top left, where there's a green and a grey building, I think both are part of the same school complex. The symbols, as I mentioned, came from the original map and were added in based on what official data we could find. Those two might not be in agreement with eachother. Data quality is a very big issue in this case, it won't be visible to a casual observer, but I know the problems are there.


Close-up building mapping -- you gotta love it. There's always history to deal with, at least in these old downtown areas. Property boundaries (even municipal boundaries!) passing through buildings, buildings extending into rights-of-way, several zip codes within one building! A cartographer's paradise.... :rolleyes:

Charles Syrett
Map Graphics
http://www.mapgraphics.com

#6
David Medeiros

David Medeiros

    Hall of Fame

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,089 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Redwood City CA
  • Interests:Cartography, wood working, wooden boats, fishing, camping, overland travel, exploring.
  • United States

I love looking at maps with building footprints, especially older European cities. I agree with the others on the street color, it blends in too much. All white may be too stark but a very light shade of the current color might look alright.

The mixing of point and area symbols for the same feature (building use) isn't ideal but it's hard to think of another way that doesn't create a new color for each mixed use. How many secondary uses are there? could you use an area pattern fill over (or under) the color to represent the secondary use? Widely spaced slashed lines of various colors?

GIS Reference and Instruction Specialist, Stanford Geospatial Center.

 

www.mapbliss.com

 


#7
Hans van der Maarel

Hans van der Maarel

    CartoTalk Editor-in-Chief

  • Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,898 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:The Netherlands
  • Interests:Cartography, GIS, history, popular science, music.
  • Netherlands

Dennis,

The grey shapes are actually public green spaces. They've got a little grey outline and since they're really small it gives off the impression of being all grey. I'm not sure whether such small specks of green (we're talking just a few square feet here) would really be useful.

David,

There might, in extreme cases, be 3-4 uses per building. I don't think it's going to be possible to show more than two and still have a meaningful map (although I did once set up an FME workbench that would cut up a building polygon into an x number of smaller parts, x being the number of addresses within that building)
Hans van der Maarel - Cartotalk Editor
Red Geographics
Email: hans@redgeographics.com / Twitter: @redgeographics

#8
Matthew Hampton

Matthew Hampton

    Hall of Fame

  • Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,325 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Portland, Oregon
  • Interests:Playing in the mountains and rivers.
  • United States

The grey shapes are actually public green spaces. They've got a little grey outline and since they're really small it gives off the impression of being all grey. I'm not sure whether such small specks of green (we're talking just a few square feet here) would really be useful.


Nice map Hans!

Instead of a grey hairline, you could give them a darker greenish hairline that might be a little more subtle with respect to those small public spaces. They grey hairline is a bit distracting in those small polygons as well as in the adjacent polygons near the Konings-Haven label.

co-cartographic creator of boringmaps.com


#9
Hans van der Maarel

Hans van der Maarel

    CartoTalk Editor-in-Chief

  • Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,898 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:The Netherlands
  • Interests:Cartography, GIS, history, popular science, music.
  • Netherlands

Updated as per Dennis and Matthew's suggestions. Also made the circles slightly bigger and the point symbols slightly smaller.

Attached File  Screen_shot_2010_05_27_at_13.48.28.png   740.43KB   95 downloads
Hans van der Maarel - Cartotalk Editor
Red Geographics
Email: hans@redgeographics.com / Twitter: @redgeographics

#10
Dennis McClendon

Dennis McClendon

    Hall of Fame

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,084 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Chicago
  • Interests:map design, large-scale maps of cities
  • United States

Looks very nice to me. A few thoughts about symbols:
  • The church symbol might be more readable with a separate bell tower.
  • Depending on the audience, it might be good to replace or supplement the VVV symbol with the tourist info i.
  • Since there's a symbol for auto parking, I might use a similar one for fietsenstalling as well.

Posted Image
Dennis McClendon, Chicago CartoGraphics
chicagocarto.com

#11
Hans van der Maarel

Hans van der Maarel

    CartoTalk Editor-in-Chief

  • Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,898 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:The Netherlands
  • Interests:Cartography, GIS, history, popular science, music.
  • Netherlands

The "Fietsenstalling" (bike parking for those of you who don't speak Dutch) is listed because it's an architectually interesting building. There's actually plenty more dedicated bike parking. On the 1:15.000 scale map we didn't show those due to space constraints, but at this scale we of course have more room to play with. I'll definately bring it up.
Hans van der Maarel - Cartotalk Editor
Red Geographics
Email: hans@redgeographics.com / Twitter: @redgeographics

#12
Hans van der Maarel

Hans van der Maarel

    CartoTalk Editor-in-Chief

  • Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,898 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:The Netherlands
  • Interests:Cartography, GIS, history, popular science, music.
  • Netherlands

So... next question...

Do I really need a legend? Obviously I do for the building colors and the point symbols. But the remaining "background" data... I mean, it's medium green for "green spaces", white-ish for roads, blue for water and a light green for "everything else"...
Hans van der Maarel - Cartotalk Editor
Red Geographics
Email: hans@redgeographics.com / Twitter: @redgeographics

#13
Dennis McClendon

Dennis McClendon

    Hall of Fame

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,084 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Chicago
  • Interests:map design, large-scale maps of cities
  • United States

My opinion, of course, is that you only need to explain the land-use categories. But normally you would list park or open space among those.

Anyone who can't figure out the streets and water probably won't get much value from the rest of the map. But inevitably someone in the client's office will say "we learned in 8th grade that everything on a map has to be shown in the legend. Isn't that some kind of rule?"

And in Germany, there might be a law ;)
Dennis McClendon, Chicago CartoGraphics
chicagocarto.com

#14
Hans van der Maarel

Hans van der Maarel

    CartoTalk Editor-in-Chief

  • Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,898 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:The Netherlands
  • Interests:Cartography, GIS, history, popular science, music.
  • Netherlands

My opinion, of course, is that you only need to explain the land-use categories. But normally you would list park or open space among those.

Anyone who can't figure out the streets and water probably won't get much value from the rest of the map. But inevitably someone in the client's office will say "we learned in 8th grade that everything on a map has to be shown in the legend. Isn't that some kind of rule?"


That's exactly why I brought this up. A legend is good of course, but do I really need to state the blatantly obvious stuff? (like using the word "map" in the map title...).

I decided to try out this approach:

Attached File  legenda.jpg   253.84KB   57 downloads

Top part explains the building classes, with the text block explaining the meaning of the colored circles. Then an explanation of the point symbols (though most of those are again rather obvious). For the terrain classes I'm giving this "little map" a go. Conveys the same information as a standard legend, but looks more interesting (and takes up some more space, the legend will go on top of an area that's on the map but actually another municipality. To avoid having an embarassingly big white spot there...

Haven't shown this to the client yet, but I'm curious to hear what you all think of it.

Edited by Hans van der Maarel, 29 May 2010 - 04:03 AM.
replaced jpg with an rgb version to get the correct colors

Hans van der Maarel - Cartotalk Editor
Red Geographics
Email: hans@redgeographics.com / Twitter: @redgeographics

#15
rudy

rudy

    Ultimate Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 754 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Canada
  • Canada

Do I really need a legend?

I think if us cartographers had our way we would never include a legend. Personally, I hate constructing legends and I am sure most others out there do too.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

-->