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#1
Mike Breiding

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Greetings,

Having only used ArcView 3.2 to produce my maps I am now hoping to migrate to AI and Pshop for finishing work.

What is the recommended workflow?

Currently I have exported the GIS data to AI and have been styling and labeling in AI.

I am wondering if this is the proffered method.
I have thus far set up the line type, color and weight, point and polygon styling, etc.
Should I know export to Pshop for styling such as drop shadows, inner and outer glow, etc and then finish in AI with labeling?


I realise AI will do much of the styling, however Pshop seems much more flixible in the options for each style - as near as I can tell.

Any suggestions?

Thanks,
-Mike

#2
mdenil

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Do all exporting from a layout. Size all views to match your target size and dimensions in the Graphics program. (I use Corel Draw, although Feehand is also good; Illustrator is a dog end, but will work in a pinch)
Place a bounding rectangle on the layout page in AV and export that rectangle with all layers. You can delete it later, but it is your guarantee that everything will scale correctly and line up in the graphics program. put the bounding rectangle about a tenth of an inch at least outside any and all parts of the actual map.

export all hill shades or other renderings as tiff (min 300 dpi); you will need ArcPress for AV. Open the image in a photo program and trim it to the size of your bounding box. You can then erase the box so it is not visible in the image.

export all vector work as Postscript (eps) (I DON'T use PostScript new, but some people swear by it).
Export ONLY one layer at a time (that is; things you want in one layer in the graphics program, it can come from more than one data layer in AV); roads, rivers, city points, etcetera. I generally separate things like major roads from minor roads in different export files. It makes symbolizing them in the graphics program easier.
symbolize your points as squares rather than circles; squares are simple but circles translate badly.
watch out for polygon dicing. AV slices complex polygons into 100 zillion tall thin polygons for display. (Windows can draw such things real fast) One can turn dicing off in ArcGIS, but not in the old AV. Very complex polygons, like a map of the countries of the world, exports better as an image because of this feature.

Keep your AV file layout extents exactly the same as your target graphics file map extents (or establish some known transformation (like scale 110%) so you know to do that to everything). That way you can go back to the AV file and create new or corrected layers any time that can be just dropped into the graphics file.

With that outer bounding box (remember that?) you can scale and snap together every layer, including image layers in the graphics program.

Importing eps into CorelDRAW, use the postscript interpreted filter (otherwise you get a grey 'postscript image' box)

Don't bother with exporting text, it is more trouble than it is worth.

Good luck

#3
Dennis McClendon

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Thanks for the step-by-step. I just started trying to use ArcView this summer and have really struggled with it. I have been baffled by the slicing of complex polygons--like nations on a global view.

I presume the data that comes with ArcView is ex DCW stuff that's good up to 1:1 000 000 or so. Is there a cheap or public-domain data source for nicely generalized world data that will not get sliced up?
Dennis McClendon, Chicago CartoGraphics
chicagocarto.com

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Martin Gamache

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Dennis,

There was a thread on this subject 2 weeks ago on the CARTO-SoC list.

Here is one of the suggested datasets:
http://www.ngdc.noaa...ines/gshhs.html

There is also a way to turn off polygon dicing via a small script in Arcmap8+

mg

#5
Mike Breiding

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Thanks for the detailed info on prepping AV 3.2 data for export to AI.

However, I finally gave up on exporting from AV 3.2 to AI because I ended up with significant overlapping of lines when the export was opened in AI CS2.
There was some discussion of this here and it was finally decided exporting from ArcGIS would produce better results.

I do not have ArcGIS so I contacted the WVU GIS Tech Center here in Morgantown and they agreed to export my data for me. This produced registered layers with only minor overlapping.

So, my original query was actually about how best to handle the data once it is in AI format.

I am very new to AI and Pshop and am not quite sure what to do with each program as it applies to producing a map.
I found out quickly the labelling is best in AI, but what about inner/outer glow, drop shadows, emboss, etc. AI is capable of these but is it capable enough? Or should raster effects be done in Pshop and then labelling, line weights and colors, etc done in AI?

I would prefer to stick with one program if possible, especially since the map I am producing does not need to be a work of art - something I am incapable of anyway.

Thanks to all,
-Mike




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