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#1
razornole

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Hello all,

Figured that I would post the legend first, for not only review and comments, but so I don't have to include it with the samples of my map. Hopefully it will help to eliminate a lot of the confusion.

Program used for this was Illy (though I used InD to put it in the map). I went with a gradient green to keep with the theme for the rest of the map. I really wanted it to be white, but I used white casing on my forest service roads so there had to be a darker background. Gray was too much in my opinion. Furthermore, I think that it helps with the transparency, i.e. it makes the colors on the legend look more like they do on the map.

Let me know what you think as a critique is always useful. Thanks,
kru

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"Ah, to see the world with the eyes of the gods is geography--to know cities and tribes, mountains and rivers, earth and sea, this is our gift."
Strabo 22AD

#2
David Medeiros

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Very nice, that's going in the "inspiration" pile. The only thing I noticed were the shadows on the coverage boxes, they appear to be in opposite directions.

Is the UTM grid meant to be a roamer for the map? It's a great idea, I've never seen it included like this on a map legend.

GIS Reference and Instruction Specialist, Stanford Geospatial Center.

 

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#3
Esther Mandeno

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Kru, everything you do is an inspiration for me. Not sure what I can add in the way of critique. The locator map seems to take up a lot of space, so I guess you want folks from as far away as Chattanooga to get their bearings?

Other than that it looks good. All your icons, lines and such look distinct and their uses are clear. Just out of curiosity, why show the permanently closed FS Roads? Are they closed to vehicular traffic and not foot traffic?
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#4
razornole

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Kru, everything you do is an inspiration for me. Not sure what I can add in the way of critique. The locator map seems to take up a lot of space, so I guess you want folks from as far away as Chattanooga to get their bearings?

Other than that it looks good. All your icons, lines and such look distinct and their uses are clear. Just out of curiosity, why show the permanently closed FS Roads? Are they closed to vehicular traffic and not foot traffic?


Thanks for the comments. Yes the Chattanooga area is going to be marketed, but I guess by that rational so is Atlanta and it is not on the map. The main goal was to leave plenty of space on the left for the UPC label. I left a space but people use all different size labels. Can't plan for everything, but I try.

The permanently closed roads are closed to vehicle traffic, however, many can be hiked, biked, or horseback ridden. My clients wanted me to include them because they have access (keys) to those roads/gates for trail maintenance.

kru
"Ah, to see the world with the eyes of the gods is geography--to know cities and tribes, mountains and rivers, earth and sea, this is our gift."
Strabo 22AD

#5
Matthew Hampton

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Great legend!

I wonder how important it is to discern Convenience Stores from Grocery stores from Camping Supply Stores from Hardware Stores? If it's not that important you could simplify things a bit - but you would have to juggle a few things to re-gain the symmetry.

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#6
Dennis McClendon

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I've already commented in the other thread about the use of icons vs. words.

But I find the different categories of trail to be way too complex. I would simplify dramatically, using a single line symbol for offroad trails, and using different colored casings for the different categories. Dark red for the main trail, burnt orange for the side trails, two violets for Appalachian trails. The same casing colors can be used behind the double-line roads or watercourses that are a different kind of trail. Proposed trails should be shown only faintly if at all, perhaps with a tiny dotted line. If the client insists, place "prop." next to every appearance of it on the map.

In my philosophy, a legend is an admission of defeat.
Dennis McClendon, Chicago CartoGraphics
chicagocarto.com




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