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#1
razornole

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This was a fun challenge, creating a profile. I had never done this in Arc/digitally. I have only created these in the field with graph paper when I survey/map caves.

Programs used are Arc and Illy. I had to create these profiles for both sides of the map. The colors used are the same colors as my hypsographic tint in the map. The trailhead/trail access icons are the same ones that I used on the map. The other labels are just points of interest/geography that one may want to know.

I'd be happy to know if others have created profiles, and of course any feedback is welcome.

kru

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"Ah, to see the world with the eyes of the gods is geography--to know cities and tribes, mountains and rivers, earth and sea, this is our gift."
Strabo 22AD

#2
Jean-Louis

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That is very cool Kru, I,ve never seen a trail profile before.
For someone lazy like me, this provides the crucial information I would look at before doing a trail. It seems to be much more relevant to the actual journey than any straight overview.
Jean-Louis Rheault
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#3
razornole

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That is very cool Kru, I,ve never seen a trail profile before.
For someone lazy like me, this provides the crucial information I would look at before doing a trail. It seems to be much more relevant to the actual journey than any straight overview.

Yep, you and me both. That means that there was no wrong way to do it! Kinda fun.

Thanks,
kru
"Ah, to see the world with the eyes of the gods is geography--to know cities and tribes, mountains and rivers, earth and sea, this is our gift."
Strabo 22AD

#4
Mike Boruta

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Very nice looking design. I'm curious to hear how you built in the hypsometric tints. I've been making a bunch of these for a guidebook project and I'm also matching the colors in the profiles to my maps, but my workflow involves: gpsvisualizer.com, Photoshop, and Illy. I have a gradient of my hyspo tints in Photoshop set up as a template and then I cut out the range of colors appropriate for each trail profile. It works well, but I keep wondering if there is a better way to do it.

A couple of quick comments:

-I really like how you have the trail symbolization along the spine of the profile

-I'm sort of confused as to why you mention "4x vertical exaggeration"

-I'm sure both ways are acceptable, but "North Bound" caught my eye. I usually think of it as one word, "Northbound" (Also, why are the labels for southbound italicized, but northbound are not?)

#5
razornole

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Very nice looking design. I'm curious to hear how you built in the hypsometric tints. I've been making a bunch of these for a guidebook project and I'm also matching the colors in the profiles to my maps, but my workflow involves: gpsvisualizer.com, Photoshop, and Illy. I have a gradient of my hyspo tints in Photoshop set up as a template and then I cut out the range of colors appropriate for each trail profile. It works well, but I keep wondering if there is a better way to do it.

A couple of quick comments:

-I really like how you have the trail symbolization along the spine of the profile

-I'm sort of confused as to why you mention "4x vertical exaggeration"

-I'm sure both ways are acceptable, but "North Bound" caught my eye. I usually think of it as one word, "Northbound" (Also, why are the labels for southbound italicized, but northbound are not?)

Hello Borga,

For me the hypsographic tint was simple. I just used a linear gradient to fill the profile in Illy. The bottom value was my lowest CMYK value and the top was the highest. I just used the eye-dropper tool in Illy to get the lowest/highest value from my map. I wasn't exact science, I just clicked approximately where it was lowest and highest.

I used 4x vertical exaggeration because the map is to scale (left to right) I put the trail miles on there, and I wanted it to scale as far as the elevation is concerned (if you do the measurement those mountains on the profile would measure about 20,000'). I don't know if it is right or wrong, but it is true. I like the exaggeration because it helps with the visualization process, i.e. this trail goes uphill in a hurry.

I have the miles delineated on my map, and at each mile-tick there is the mile marker coming from the south and north. the north miles are in regular and the south miles are italic. I kept that the same on my profile so it matched the map.

Good luck and thanks for the comments,
kru
kru
"Ah, to see the world with the eyes of the gods is geography--to know cities and tribes, mountains and rivers, earth and sea, this is our gift."
Strabo 22AD

#6
DaveB

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I like the way you matched the map symbology (hypsometry, trails, etc.) in the profile.

I think it does need to explicitly state the vertical exaggeration like you did. Otherwise people might expect the vertical scale to match the horizontal scale (plenty of people probably will anyway; if they even think about it). If you think the vertical scale is the same as the horizontal scale you might be put off from attempting this climb (I mean hike!). ;)

Overall a nice design and a great addition to the map!
Dave Barnes
Esri
Product Engineer
Map Geek

#7
Esther Mandeno

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I like the design, too, but I don't like the horizontal lines.

That's just me, though. I don't like horizontal lines on anything for some reason. :rolleyes:
------
Esther Mandeno
Life is like riding a bicycle. To keep your balance you must keep moving. - Albert Einstein

#8
AndyM

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I remember using a very simple profile on a small local trail years ago, and it greatly enhanced my sense of location and to my enjoyment of the hike. This one is far more useful -- and attractive.

From a usage point of view, I do feel it's hard to read the absolute elevation in the middle part of the trail. You're really far from the elevation labels at each end of the profile, and the horizontal reference lines are interrupted by the green landmass. Even if the lines were carried through the green it would be a long haul to follow them across.

This is a very clean graphic right now, and I can't think of a solution that wouldn't detract from that. Maybe absolute elevation isn't that important when you are out on the trail?

Can't wait for more of this map to be revealed!

Andy

PS: I must get around to introducing myself ....

#9
Matthew Hampton

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That's very kool Kru! I like how the upper gradient and the hypso pull your eyes onto the trail. I'm a little confused by the Northbound and Southbound mileage, but I think it would make sense in context of the map. Shouldn't the Northbound mileage on the right side start at 41? I would think the mileage would wrap around from the bottom and continue on the top, but there must be different starting/ending points on either end.

co-cartographic creator of boringmaps.com


#10
razornole

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Thanks for the replys,

Esther, I toyed with other solutions for the elevation, the main one being just labeling the highest elevation for my named labels. However, this left a lot of interpolation for the hiker (thought they still have to interpolate with the lines). In the end I reverted back to my caving way of using graph paper. On my first proof all the gray lines were light, and it made my head spin trying to figure out which line was which, so I alternated with a darker line on this proof.

Andy, I did try to put the lines over the "mountains". I didn't like it. I thought about how I put graticules under my land masses to make them figures on small scale maps, so I used the same technique here. To me the mountains are now figures and the grey and lines (graticules) are the ground. Besides one can always count down from the top.

Matthew, I can see the confusion, but there is not much to do about it. It is a two-sided map and you are only seeing the profile for one side. This profile matches the coverage for the trail on this side of the map. In all the trail is 74 miles long.

Thanks again,
kru
"Ah, to see the world with the eyes of the gods is geography--to know cities and tribes, mountains and rivers, earth and sea, this is our gift."
Strabo 22AD

#11
KrafftyMan

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This is great. I'm glad I stumbled across this as I was going to make something like this for some of the trails in the parks where I work. I started the process but ran into some problems with Arc and never returned to the project. You have inspired me to finish it now. Thanks for sharing!

#12
Gushue

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I have been using ARc/ Illy as well to create profiles for trails in the Prescott, Arizona area. Though these are for trails that never measure longer than 1 - 2 miles. The method I use is creating 3d lines from topos and importing the .txt file of the profile into Illustrator. The one problem I run into is how the points are calculated, since most of our trail information is derived via field gps methods. It creates non-equidistant vertices, thus giving the profiles either exaggerated or complex looks. I other than the data behind the profiles, the method of creating the graphics in Illustrator is quite simple, IMHO. Thanks for this example it gives me something to think about.

Steve Gushue
GIS Specialist
Prescott, Arizona

#13
Kathi

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Very nice profile! I agree with other posters that to mention the vertical exaggeration is crucial. (But then maybe that's just me: As a geologist I'm used to work with geological cross sections that might be anything from 1:1 to vertically exaggerated 10 times. Not knowing what you're looking at makes things very confusing!)

I like the colours, too.

Cheers,
Kathi
Cheers,

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#14
E Nile

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Nice profile. I wish more map makers would use this technique.
About 20 years ago I made a similar product in AML to show vegetation under a powerline corridor.

One suggestion I would make is to use geospatial data to create a color 2-D fill to represent different ground conditions encountered along the trail.

Here is vegetation derived from LiDAR:
Attached File  tree_profile.jpg   52KB   87 downloads

Here is snapshot of soils along a transect:
Attached File  soil_xsection.jpg   71.08KB   78 downloads

Knowing aspect or shade might be valuable to help plan for hot periods of the day for a trail hiker.

Regards

GP

#15
razornole

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Nice profile. I wish more map makers would use this technique.
About 20 years ago I made a similar product in AML to show vegetation under a powerline corridor.

One suggestion I would make is to use geospatial data to create a color 2-D fill to represent different ground conditions encountered along the trail.

Here is vegetation derived from LiDAR:
Attached File  tree_profile.jpg   52KB   87 downloads

Here is snapshot of soils along a transect:
Attached File  soil_xsection.jpg   71.08KB   78 downloads

Knowing aspect or shade might be valuable to help plan for hot periods of the day for a trail hiker.

Regards

GP


Thanks for the suggestion. The primary purpose of the elevation profile was just that, elevation. It would be tough to show aspect/shade because it would change with the seasons. I think that it would be more of a winter thing as the trail is under a close canopy. However, to find a warm sunny spot on a cold day would be nice. Oh well they can always use the planview.

kru
"Ah, to see the world with the eyes of the gods is geography--to know cities and tribes, mountains and rivers, earth and sea, this is our gift."
Strabo 22AD




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