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Producing Awesome Hillshades

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#1
Giggles

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Hi All,

I was hoping someone could explain a detailed workflow to achieve this fantastic shaded relied done by Rafal
Rafal's Work

I am a novice Cartographer and was hoping if some can give me a good workflow to awesome shaded relief results. I use ArcGIS and am familiar with the hillshade function using spatial analyst. I know how to produce basic hillshades but am interested in a workflow (such as photoshop or combining different DEMs) to achieve really nice shaded relief used as a background like Rafal's work.

#2
David Medeiros

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Hi All,

I was hoping someone could explain a detailed workflow to achieve this fantastic shaded relied done by Rafal
Rafal's Work

I am a novice Cartographer and was hoping if some can give me a good workflow to awesome shaded relief results. I use ArcGIS and am familiar with the hillshade function using spatial analyst. I know how to produce basic hillshades but am interested in a workflow (such as photoshop or combining different DEMs) to achieve really nice shaded relief used as a background like Rafal's work.


Below are a couple of links to some good basic info on relief shading. For more theory I'd also recommend reading Eduard Imhof's "Cartographic Relief Presentations"

http://www.shadedrelief.com/

http://www.reliefshading.com/

I do a fair amount of this type of work but in a simpler more straightforward approach, usually one layer of shading under a screened back map. There are more complex methods of mixing relief shading at different resolutions and transparencies used to get the combination of detail and generalization that one often thinks of in Swiss topographic maps. Rafal's map seems to have some of that, although I think it's a bit harsh in some areas and needs Photo Shop work to lighten and soften it a bit.

Natural Scene Designer is a great program for working with elevation data, easier to use than Arcs extensions. Most output has to be at least minimally processed through Photo Shop to get it to look right in the map, this usually involves altering the levels a bit and applying a slight blur.

To start with I'd spend some time going over the information in those links I posted.

GIS Reference and Instruction Specialist, Stanford Geospatial Center.

 

www.mapbliss.com

 


#3
Charles Syrett

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Good reply from David -- I agree that you have to "put yourself to school" first. (Not school literally, but in the sense of real study of the sources and then practicing, and with patience.) It's like hearing a concert pianist play and then wanting to learn to do that. First you have to do a lot of learning fingering and practicing scales! ;) Relative to shaded relief -- everyone develops their own style and workflow. But the resources David points to here are fundamental.

Charles Syrett
Map Graphics
http://www.mapgraphics.com

#4
Pete

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Definately have a look at those links that David posted - the Relief shading website in particular has great examples of different kinds of ... well ... relief shading - and I completly agree with Charles

That website is exactly where I started out. I studied the information on colours from grey shaded relief because that is what I had to have and could easily make for myself. I tried to copy the example shown exactly but for whatever reason I coulnd't quite manage it so I developed my own way around things and arrived at my own sort of style.

#5
DaveB

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Great suggestions!

If I may and if you're using ArcGIS, you might also want to check out the Hillshade Tools on the ESRI Mapping Center's Resources section :)
Dave Barnes
Esri
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#6
Giggles

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Great suggestions. I will put myself through "school" with practice and patience. In the mean time, I was curious if any of you professionals out there created a photoshop script that produces various types shaded relief. Not that I want to take a shortcut here, but would like to deconstruct the script and see how it was done in photoshop. I have followed Tom Patterson's photoshop tutorial but some of the more amazing shaded relief I have seen posted on this site uses more advanced techniques I would like to learn.

#7
Pete

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It's maybe the way I do things but I don't use scripts in Photoshop - I generate my relief in ArcMap (a program more readily associated with its ability to generate enmity than relief :lol: !) and use Photoshop to blend and mask. You can record certain processes as action to semi-automate your workflow but I've found that I very rarely do the same thing twice - I'll use the same effects but I may have to change the properties of the effect depending on the scale of the map or the range of the DEM.




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