Jump to content

 
Photo

Walking route map

- - - - -

  • Please log in to reply
22 replies to this topic

#16
David Medeiros

David Medeiros

    Hall of Fame

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,089 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Redwood City CA
  • Interests:Cartography, wood working, wooden boats, fishing, camping, overland travel, exploring.
  • United States

I did a quick search and found this color blind simulator, where you point it to an image on your machine to see how it would look to people with various types of color-blindness. I just gave it a cursory glance, but it might be worth looking into. I've seen/heard of similar sites in the past.


One that I use frequently, that I feel works really well is ColorOracle.. Like Dave mentioned, there are several out there - but ColorOracle was made by a cartographer!


Does anybody have a sense of whether or not the built in Illustrator colorblind simualtor is less robust than these online versions? Should I be looking beyond illy for this or do they simply duplicate each others results?

GIS Reference and Instruction Specialist, Stanford Geospatial Center.

 

www.mapbliss.com

 


#17
Laura Miles

Laura Miles

    Master Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 116 posts
  • Canada

One that I use frequently, that I feel works really well is ColorOracle.. Like Dave mentioned, there are several out there - but ColorOracle was made by a cartographer!


Wow, that's a great program! Thanks for the tip!

#18
christine.skl

christine.skl

    Key Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 62 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Hangzhou, China
  • Interests:Cartography, GIS, Travel, Books, Music
  • China

Draft 2 - much betetr. I don't have ancient eyes, but not the best eyesight ever and I just didn't sleep a night (am shortsighted + certain other issues).

Few things - for me "North" indicating arrow always should be on top in the upper right corner of the map, also it should always have a very distinctive color (you have a shade of brown very similar to the background). The title of the map also could be in more distinctive color, I almost took it for an object on a map.

When I get a new, unknown map, I read it in this order:
1. Title
2. North Arrow,
3. Legend (I work with different types of maps, so I need to make sure that I know the symbols),
4. Content.

I lack black borders (usually it's not 100% black color, rather a smaller percentage of it) on the sides of the roads. This will give a feeling that roads are "higher" than background and will separate them from the background. If you do the borders, the background color can be less intense.

I like:
I like symbols to identify the routes, they are easy to get, good description.

Have fun with working with your map.
Christine
Christine

#19
Laura Miles

Laura Miles

    Master Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 116 posts
  • Canada

Thanks for the feedback Christine, I will add a road case as it's been mentioned by two people now. Though I have to beg to differ on the location of the north arrow you are suggesting...I find they are usually lower left or right. I could put it top right if I had a text box containing legend, title, descriptions etc. but I don't think that's the right place for it in this particular situation.
Thanks again!
Laura

#20
David Medeiros

David Medeiros

    Hall of Fame

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,089 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Redwood City CA
  • Interests:Cartography, wood working, wooden boats, fishing, camping, overland travel, exploring.
  • United States

Thanks for the feedback Christine, I will add a road case as it's been mentioned by two people now. Though I have to beg to differ on the location of the north arrow you are suggesting...I find they are usually lower left or right. I could put it top right if I had a text box containing legend, title, descriptions etc. but I don't think that's the right place for it in this particular situation.
Thanks again!
Laura


From a cartographic design standpoint, there is no fixed, correct placement for the N arrow. It's best to place it in an empty spot on the map typically towards one corner or another. But this may not always be practical. Its often used to balance other map elements such as scale bar, title, legend or source notes and should be placed strategically with those in mind to avoid clumping the marginalia together. The goal is clear readability, not strict adherence to placement rules.

Edited to add: in many cases a N arrow is not even warranted or accurate. Keep map projection in mind when using a N arrow as it may only be accurate for one location on the map. Also remember that if the area being mapped has an obvious or well known orientation the N arrow is superfluous and can be left off.

GIS Reference and Instruction Specialist, Stanford Geospatial Center.

 

www.mapbliss.com

 


#21
christine.skl

christine.skl

    Key Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 62 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Hangzhou, China
  • Interests:Cartography, GIS, Travel, Books, Music
  • China

@ Laura

Welcome:)

@ David Madeiros
Interesting thing you brought into my knowledge, with the N arrow I said as I was taught! Good to rethink something new.

Christine
Christine

#22
David Medeiros

David Medeiros

    Hall of Fame

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,089 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Redwood City CA
  • Interests:Cartography, wood working, wooden boats, fishing, camping, overland travel, exploring.
  • United States

@ Laura

Welcome:)

@ David Madeiros
Interesting thing you brought into my knowledge, with the N arrow I said as I was taught! Good to rethink something new.

Christine


I think students of cartography and GIS are often taught more rigid map making rules than truly exist, mostly because it's difficult in the span of a single course to fully explore a lot of the more nuanced approaches or exceptions to the rules. Also past courses in traditional cartography stressed many of these "rules" because their medium was scribe coat, film negatives and ink plates. It was a lot less flexible of a design environment, it was difficult to experiment and mistakes were hard to fix.

GIS Reference and Instruction Specialist, Stanford Geospatial Center.

 

www.mapbliss.com

 


#23
christine.skl

christine.skl

    Key Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 62 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Hangzhou, China
  • Interests:Cartography, GIS, Travel, Books, Music
  • China

@ David Madeiros.

Again an interesting comment I get! And a very useful one, especially when I am writing my thesis. Again, thank you.
Christine




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

-->