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GPS vs Paper Maps

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#1
CHART

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As a paper map enthusiast I really like this one.


http://www.miller-mc...just-yet-11077/

regards,
Chart

#2
David Medeiros

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Good article. I was one of those CSAA cartographers and I never get tired of hearing how well respected our maps were. I applaud any effort to debunk the myth of GPS accuracy and the "always up to date" device. Not that most people have a good sense of their geography anyway these days but the demise of paper mapping has really been death blow to many individuals personal sense of place.

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#3
François Goulet

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I applaud any effort to debunk the myth of GPS accuracy and the "always up to date" device.


Yeah... Or people getting lost following Google Maps or any other online mapping site... Not later than yesterday, GM made us go by a dead-end who was supposedly be a shortcut... Had to do a 15 km detour after that... :angry:

That street isn't complete on any paper map I checked...

#4
Esther Mandeno

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Hey, folks have been getting lost with and without any kind of map for a long time. ;)

But, I agree. I love paper maps, too and it's hard to see them fall from favor. Any proof that applauds their worth is fine by me.

I'm more interested in the maps we have in our heads and how we generate them. I've always been the sort of person that can navigate back to a place I've been to without the aid of a map, anywhere, anyhow. I've only have to have been there once, and I can get back to it from any direction. It's a little weird. Like a homing device in my head. Where does that come from? :o
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Life is like riding a bicycle. To keep your balance you must keep moving. - Albert Einstein

#5
Jean-Louis

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It's a little weird. Like a homing device in my head. Where does that come from? :o


Yea, I,ve always had that sense of direction even as a child. And some people just never can develop it.
I find that it has something to do with visual recognition of a landmark or two and then being able to innately triangulate from there.

What I find nasty is audio GPS directions in a car. It,s kinda cool to follow them but then I find that I have no recollection whatsoever of the route I followed. I got to my destination but my brain learned nothing.
Jean-Louis Rheault
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#6
Laura Miles

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Just today Google Maps identified a street incorrectly when I tried to look up an address...I had to snicker at the fact that the street sign captured in the "Street View" photo identified the correct name of the street.

#7
Derek Tonn

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It's a little weird. Like a homing device in my head. Where does that come from? :o


Yea, I,ve always had that sense of direction even as a child. And some people just never can develop it.
I find that it has something to do with visual recognition of a landmark or two and then being able to innately triangulate from there.


I've always had that "chip" in my head that points me to North or gets me to my destination too. Weird to explain...but I often feel like I could be parachuted into somewhere I've never been before, even on an overcast evening, and I'll figure out North in about 1-2 seconds without even thinking about it. Or take a few roads I've never traveled before and end up at the place I was looking for.

I am very much a landmark navigator though. I remember the first time I drove on a new stretch of Highway 212 SW of Minneapolis. I had driven that route more times than I could count! However, when the new road opened, I felt like I might has well have been driving on a highway in Illinois or Pennsylvania. Completely lost without those incredibly familiar landmarks dotting the left and right sides of the highway. I knew where I was going, so it's not like I had to pull out a map or ask for directions! However, all my "turns" and those warm, familiar features along the side of the road were gone...so it felt as though I could have been driving on Mars for a while. :)

I've never been one to navigate by names, lat/long or distances. Give me that silo painted to look like a giant 7Up can...or the limousine service based out of someone's old farm and outbuildings, or that cool S-shaped bridge that crosses up and over the railroad tracks any day.
Derek Tonn
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mapformation, LLC

datonn@mapformation.com
http://www.mapformation.com

#8
Esther Mandeno

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Maybe folks with built in homing devices naturally gravitate to some sort of spatial career?

...I often feel like I could be parachuted into somewhere I've never been before, even on an overcast evening, and I'll figure out North in about 1-2 seconds without even thinking about it.


I used to think I could do that too, until I visited my husband's home country - New Zealand. It's absolutely amazing how much information we infer from the angle of the sun. Though I can still do the same 'homing pigeon' thing there, I can't tell you north from south. East-west is fine, but I get north and south mixed up each and every time.

@MappoGirl - yeah, it's funny to see the mistakes that are so glaring to all us locals. It's like, don't they have hundreds of employees that fact check their products? :blink:
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#9
Bogdanovits

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As a paper map enthusiast I really like this one.


http://www.miller-mc...just-yet-11077/

regards,

My vision is similar:
http://pannoncart.hu...sh/research.htm

The future of road maps
The transformation of navigation systems into maps
Andras BOGDANOVITS, Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest, Hungary
Earth Sciences Doctorate School
Email: bogdanovits@gmail.com

#10
DaveB

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I have no sense of direction! :lol:
That's part of what got me interested in maps.

If I wander around enough I can usually find my way to something familiar. And I can follow a paper map much more easily than verbal directions.
Dave Barnes
Esri
Product Engineer
Map Geek

#11
Albireo Telematics

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Great article!
Thanks for share!!..
And for me GPS is always better den paper ;)




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