Jump to content

 
Photo

Creating Contour Lines

- - - - -

  • Please log in to reply
6 replies to this topic

#1
OdeBode

OdeBode

    Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPip
  • 17 posts
  • United States

Hello,

I'm attempting to create a contour shapefile in ArcGIS for the Mt Hood area. I've started downloading 10m DEMs from EROS (seamless.usgs.gov). The downloading has been very tedious so far and there appear to be large holes in the data. Any suggestions? Also, what are your suggestions on workflow for DEM -> Contours in ArcGIS?

Many Thanks,

Adam

#2
oskarlin

oskarlin

    Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPip
  • 23 posts
  • Sweden

If you can't find better DEM:s then you can always try interpolating the holes.

And for contours, just run the Contour function in the toolbox -> 3D analyst -> Raster surface -> Contour (you need ArcInfo for that).

#3
OdeBode

OdeBode

    Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPip
  • 17 posts
  • United States

Thanks. I realized that I was downloading the 1/9 arc DEM, which is the high resolution, non-continuous DEM. I switched to the 1/3 arc (10m) and got the data I needed. I used the Contour tool (Spatial Analyst) set the contour interval at 100' and the z field at 3.28. The lines are quite jagged and raw looking. I tried the SmoothLine tool (Data Management) using the PAEK algorithm, which didn't generalize the line as much as I was hoping.

Sounds like most people are using Illustrator for this function. At the cost of $4000 for ArcView and Spatial Analyst I'm starting to realize that ESRI is probably not the most practical solution for creating custom topo maps.

#4
Charles Syrett

Charles Syrett

    Ultimate Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 537 posts
  • Canada

At the cost of $4000 for ArcView and Spatial Analyst I'm starting to realize that ESRI is probably not the most practical solution for creating custom topo maps.


If that's all you're using Arc for, you're right -- not practical. Like driving a Rolls to get to the corner store. There are lots of under $500 apps that can contour and generalize and do shaded relief, with lots of controls. Manifold, Global Mapper, Surfer, etc etc....

Charles Syrett
Map Graphics
http://www.mapgraphics.com

#5
OdeBode

OdeBode

    Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPip
  • 17 posts
  • United States

Like driving a Rolls to get to the corner store.

Well, I'm stuck with this Rolls for the next 45 days or so ;) as it's an evaluation license. My one and only client has an ArcView license that I will have at my disposal after the evaluation expires, and I just bought the Adobe CS4 Suite.

Still, I'll probably end up wanting a program such as GlobalMapper, Manifold, or Surfer to produce shading and contours. I've done a fair amount of research, but this question remains: what is the best low-cost GIS compliment to the Adobe Suite? GM, Manifold or Surfer? I only have the $ for one and I should also mention that I have access to high-res USGS topos via AllTopo Pro.

#6
Charles Syrett

Charles Syrett

    Ultimate Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 537 posts
  • Canada

I've done a fair amount of research, but this question remains: what is the best low-cost GIS compliment to the Adobe Suite? GM, Manifold or Surfer? I only have the $ for one and I should also mention that I have access to high-res USGS topos via AllTopo Pro.


The only one of those three that's a complete GIS is Manifold. Global Mapper is easier to use, but doesn't have the editing features that Manifold has. Surfer just focuses on the creation of surfaces and their by-products (such as contouring, shaded relief, etc.) If you have to pick one, it should be Manifold.

Charles Syrett
Map Graphics
http://www.mapgraphics.com

#7
OdeBode

OdeBode

    Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPip
  • 17 posts
  • United States

Many thanks Charles




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

-->