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NorCal URISA

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#1
Amy Cohen

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I made this after attending my first NorCal URISA (Urban and Regional Information Systems Association) meeting in Sacramento. I'm in the process of developing a portfolio of cartographic works / map art, so I thought I'd play with the NorCal URISA logo, which is a map of California highlighting the counties included in the northern California chapter of the organization. I was also recently introduced to the works of Vassily Kandinsky, a Russian abstractionalist. I enjoy his use of spherical and linear elements, and think they work very well in a cartographic context.

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#2
Greg Corradini

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I made this after attending my first NorCal URISA (Urban and Regional Information Systems Association) meeting in Sacramento. I'm in the process of developing a portfolio of cartographic works / map art, so I thought I'd play with the NorCal URISA logo, which is a map of California highlighting the counties included in the northern California chapter of the organization. I was also recently introduced to the works of Vassily Kandinsky, a Russian abstractionalist. I enjoy his use of spherical and linear elements, and think they work very well in a cartographic context.

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Thanks posting this Amy. I think it's beautiful. It reminds me of concert screen prints. Nice.

#3
Jean-Louis

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Hi Amy,

Interesting and a creative use of graphic elements. In cartography however, you want your design elements to support the clarity of your basic map information not obscure it.

It took me a while to 'see' the map of California. My eye assumed that the blue counties were a stand-alone map of a place called Urisa. which at least got me curious!

I would try to use the graphic elements to make the California silhouette more obvious and also include the words that the URISA acronym stands for.

Hope this helps.
Jean-Louis Rheault
Montreal


#4
Amy Cohen

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Hi Amy,

Interesting and a creative use of graphic elements. In cartography however, you want your design elements to support the clarity of your basic map information not obscure it.

It took me a while to 'see' the map of California. My eye assumed that the blue counties were a stand-alone map of a place called Urisa. which at least got me curious!

I would try to use the graphic elements to make the California silhouette more obvious and also include the words that the URISA acronym stands for.

Hope this helps.



Thanks for the advice! Perhaps this "map" wold fit more appropriately in the "map art" category.

-Amy

#5
Nick H

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...Interesting and a creative use of graphic elements. In cartography however, you want your design elements to support the clarity of your basic map information not obscure it...

I love this graphic, but what Jean-Louis says is important too. Art is about self-expression and map-making is about something else; with a work like this there will always be a deal to be struck between the two.

Regards, N.
Caversham, Reading, England.




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