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Looking for 1:25,000 Shaded Relief TIFs

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#31
SteveR

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Dear JoeFred,

If what you want is to see what the map will look like when the shaded relief uses different color schemes, you can do that using the original DEM. When you right click on the DEM and select Reflectance Options, there are 3 choices under greyscale. The IHS Elev might be the one you want. Right click, Display Parameter will give you at least 15 other ways to display the relief that don't involve shading. When you find one that gives you the effect you want, the scale of your DEM can be made the same as your image by selecting Edit, Modify, Set Map Pixel Size, and typing in the number of meters per pixel. The DEM can be saved as an image using File, Save Map as Image, With World File.

You haven't asked about this next item, and nobody's mentioned it, but it's something you might want to know about: Roads, trails, boundaries, streams, and other features are available from various sites as shape files. If you use them, they can be overlaid onto your map in your choice of colors and line thicknesses, and they can greatly reduce the amount of time it will take you to create the map. Microdem can't use them unless the shapes use geographic coordinates, but it has tools that can do the conversion (IN/OUT, Resample).

http://freegeography...lay-in-microdem
Leszek Pawlowicz's blog at the above link provides some good information on Microdem and other free and cheap mapping software. You will probably find it an interesting place to explore.

Steve R.


#32
JoeFred

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I'm happy to say I have products are online and in many outfitter shops in the area of Great Smoky Mountains National Park (USA). A sample: Lower Hazel Creek in NC.

Now as I am looking to add GPS coordinates, I am now concerned that my shaded relief images are slightly clockwise off vertical whereas the UTM grid tick mark pairs are parallel to the sides of the cropped images. In the case of the source regular TIFs and the Trails Illustrated maps for the Park, the UTM grid appears to be 1 degree 29 minutes CCW off vertical.

Was this difference a result of my having to convert my GEOTIFFs from Tennessee State Plane (feet) to UTM Grid Zone 17 North?

It would seem I should simply rotate my shaded relief images CCW, by what I believe would be 1 degree 29 minutes. Is that an acceptable solution?

JF

#33
Melita Kennedy

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I'm happy to say I have products are online and in many outfitter shops in the area of Great Smoky Mountains National Park (USA). A sample: Lower Hazel Creek in NC.

Now as I am looking to add GPS coordinates, I am now concerned that my shaded relief images are slightly clockwise off vertical whereas the UTM grid tick mark pairs are parallel to the sides of the cropped images. In the case of the source regular TIFs and the Trails Illustrated maps for the Park, the UTM grid appears to be 1 degree 29 minutes CCW off vertical.

Was this difference a result of my having to convert my GEOTIFFs from Tennessee State Plane (feet) to UTM Grid Zone 17 North?

It would seem I should simply rotate my shaded relief images CCW, by what I believe would be 1 degree 29 minutes. Is that an acceptable solution?

JF


Hi,

I'm not quite sure I understand. If the map's coordinate system is UTM 17N, its grid is the only one guaranteed to be regular and perfectly up/right aligned. The SPCS zone's central meridian won't be the same as the UTM zone, and your area interest probably isn't located at either one. So a grid of the SPCS coords or a graticule showing the lat/lon values should be skewed. The amount will vary depending on the area of interest's location relative to the various projection parameters (but mostly the central meridians).

Melita

#34
JoeFred

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Thanks, Melita. I now see that my images being skewed did not occur from converting my GEOTIFFs from Tennessee State Plane (feet) to UTM Grid Zone 17 North. They are that way in the source TIFFs and DRGs. I now know what I need to do.

Thanks again,
JF

#35
JoeFred

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Hi JoeFred,

Peter Guth's Microdem can make shaded reliefs. First you'll need a seamless DEM of your project area, getting it in GridFloat at probably 1/3 arcsecond resolution. The way you'd do it is to open the DEM and then one of your topo maps maps and set it at 1:1 scale. Right click and select Display Parameter, Blank. Now do a right click and select 3D Map Options. For shading, select Terrain Shadows. For Stereo Mode, select None. The result will be a map at the same scale as your quadrangle which only shows the shaded relief. It can serve as a base map to which anything else can be added. Here are some links:

Microdem:
http://www.usna.edu/...em/microdem.htm

Seamless USGS:
http://seamless.usgs.gov/index.php


With the great help I got in 2010, I've been able to produce over 50 large scale & content rich maps of trout steams in Great Smoky Mountains National Park and the region (www.smokystreams.com). A lot of work, but I still find this to be fun. Now, here's my situation. I had gotten to where I could download the DEMs from the now defunct USGS Seamless Server in my sleep practically. Now that it has been replaced with the USGS TNM 2.0 Viewer, I am in need of help making the transition. As before all I need are simple hill-and-shade, Microdem-compatible DEMs in GridFloat at 1/3 arcsecond resolution. Can someone point me to a tutorial on that or give me some tips. It would be very much appreciated. – JF 



#36
SteveR

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Hi JoeFred, nice to hear from you again.  As you mention, Seamless USGS is now much more difficult to use.  I've discovered another source that works the same way as Seamless once did:

 

http://www.mrlc.gov/viewerjs/

 

This might seem like it's just for downloading landcover data, but you'll discover it also lets you specify the boundaries of a box to get digital elevation models, same as before.  Whoever wrote the viewer thought 1/3" meant 1/3rd inch instead of 1/3rd arcsecond.

 

Steve Richardson


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#37
JoeFred

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Hello, Steve. It's great to see you are still here and contributing. The MRLC Consortium Viewer worked nicely. The headsup on the inch versus arcsecond matter was helpful.

 

Thanks a bunch!

 

Fred Turner


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