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Time to Reintroduce Myself. . .


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#1
Speerdm

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Hello fellow Carto-nerds,

I've been coming to this forum off and on for the last couple years and its always given me interesting insight to the world of cartography. In the past month I've started a new career path that focuses more on cartography than the physical processes of rivers of which I spent most of my time studying in school.

After earning a BS in Geography at University Wisconsin-Eau Claire and spending two years in gradschool at Missouri State University, I found an internship this fall working for the Patagonian Expedition Race in Punta Arenas, Chile Patagonian Expedition Race Website. The race covers ~600km extremely rough unforgiving Patagonian wilderness. Racers compete by trekking, climbing, kayaking, and mountain biking to reach the finish line.

This opportunity so far has presented itself to be both exciting, and challenging. I have the privilege/challenge of creating navigational maps for the racers and eye candy maps for publication on the website and other media. Racers will be covering territory that has been rarely seen by the human eye and detailed maps of these places don't exist.

Another challenge is that geodata for this region of the world is extremely limited. Navigational maps in years past were between 1:50,000 and 1:200,000. Last years maps looked like this: Map Preview. Any thoughts or ideas for improving upon these?

Unfortunately, this year's route of the race is secret, so I cannot post any maps for public scrutiny until after the race has started. Though, I would be interested if anyone has any tips when it comes to making a map that is universally intelligible across several different languages (English and Spanish are languages that someone from each race team should know).

Advice is greatly appreciated both in cartographic design and building my career up from this internship. Thanks for reading!

Kind regards,

Dave Speer

#2
s hubbard

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the maps from last year are just my style, i like them very much.
i saw the job advertisement for mapping that race for awhile this last year. congrats. i bet it's incredible down there.
always wanted to see Patagonia some day.
is anybody GPSing and sending you data from the field? or do you map solely from sensed sources? are the racers finding it accurate enough?
can't wait to see this year's stuff!
s hubbard
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#3
Speerdm

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the maps from last year are just my style, i like them very much.
i saw the job advertisement for mapping that race for awhile this last year. congrats. i bet it's incredible down there.
always wanted to see Patagonia some day.
is anybody GPSing and sending you data from the field? or do you map solely from sensed sources? are the racers finding it accurate enough?
can't wait to see this year's stuff!



Patagonia is a beautiful place and the people are awesome as well. Right now I'm mapping with just sensed sources. Though, I will be mapping the progress of the race teams with SPOT GPS tracking. It should be pretty exciting to see how the race unfolds through their SPOT messages.

Even though I'm doing the best I can with what I have, I've been told to have a thick skin when it comes to what the racers say about the maps. Navigating with them adds to the challenge of the race. This is also why navigational GPS units are for emergency purposes only and racers are disqualified if they break the seal on them. Watch for the maps sometime in mid February.

-Dave

#4
s hubbard

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sounds so fun dave...
i'm thinking they should have some super-trekkers map the course first with the finest GPS they can get.
the course could still be kept secret even with preliminary GPS.
can the racers have altimeters? and just maps you produce, or can they bring their own?
post some cool photos if you can >>
s hubbard
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#5
Speerdm

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sounds so fun dave...
i'm thinking they should have some super-trekkers map the course first with the finest GPS they can get.
the course could still be kept secret even with preliminary GPS.
can the racers have altimeters? and just maps you produce, or can they bring their own?
post some cool photos if you can >>


We have digitized a race route, but this is purposefully kept out of the maps. Racers will have to determine the best way to get to each checkpoint based on their interpretation of the aerial photo and contour lines. Since they won't know the start and finish points until the night before the race, our maps should be the only ones that they have to go by. I believe altimeters are permitted, but i'm not sure if anyone has or will be using them. The Patagonian Expedition Race is a non profit organization which strives to emphasize the importance of protecting the environment. Feel free to check out the links to the company's social networking sites to view pictures and videos:

facebook: http://www.facebook....49756217?ref=nf
youtube: http://www.youtube.c...tagonianExpRace
twitter: http://twitter.com/PatagonianRace

#6
bdwillet

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Hello,

I have been doing mapping down here in patagonia on/off since 1999. Lots of data available, sometimes hard to find. Metadata does not exist here!

I am friends with Mitch Day and know French, sorry we didn't meet,

bye




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