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#16
EOSGIS

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Thank Jean, its greatful to learn something new.
The example you provide is similar to a lot of names in spanis, i.e: Japan, in old Spanish maps is Cipango... (what columbus was seeking) . If we say it quickly, quickly.. it sounds somewhat Japón, which is the actual name in spanish. A lot of names seem to be written originally by phonetic sound.
And about translations... I like the name for "Nevada" in U.S.A., but I cant imagine to tranlate it to "Snowy" (It sounds more like a Walt Disney state ;-) ). Or "Florida" as "Flowery" Or "California" to "Hotiest"... BUT let time and history go on, and we will see it, sure...
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Fernando

#17
DaveB

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Jean-Louis, that's interesting about river vs. big river - of course where I live "river" is, um, a rather nebulous concept. :lol: We have "rivers" like the Los Angeles River that are concrete channels for large portions. And we have rivers like the Santa Ana River near where I live that are mostly dry river beds most of the time. Around here we don't have anything that I think could be considered a "big river" year round, so the term wouldn't get much use. :P

EOSGIS, regarding translations - yeah, some place names shouldn't be translated. :) Even the local population doesn't translate them into the predominant language of the area. I thought the name California came from stories about a mythical land, California, ruled by Queen Califia. Apparently that's just one possibility. I didn't know another origin put forth by some people is that is comes from Catalan words that equate to "hot as an oven". I think the former is more likely. California isn't usually that hot unless it was named by someone who first encountered it out in the desert. :P But the lack of clear origins would make translation more difficult. ha!

Regarding "ownership" of maps - I think it would be next to impossible to make a living as a cartographer if you didn't compromise from time to time. Also, we all make mistakes on maps, omissions, typos, computer errors, etc. And once it's out of your hands there are more opportunities for others to make mistakes. I guess the best we can do is try not to make any maps we would be ashamed to sign our names to, although you might not always have that luxury if you don't work for yourself. As for mistakes the best we can do is try to catch them, correct them when we can, maybe in later editions, and in the end let go and move on to the next map. :)
Dave Barnes
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#18
EOSGIS

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Well, about the mithycal name of California, it may be, I'm not up to date about exact name origin, and conquistador's uses a lot of such names. But think that initially sapniards only know Baja California (in México) and they think it was an Island. Baja is really hot. But sure its not a catalan name. Juan Rodríguez Cabrillo wasn't Catalan, but Portuguese serving Castilla and the name for the US state is just an extension of the Mexican peninsula.
It may be a mythical derived name, but from a "holly" point of view, and knowing my compatriots... a hot place is California, a cold place with snow is Nevada (if you see it at first sight in winter... in summer ... wow!!! :-) ) . Explorers are simple sometimes.
i.e: "Hot Springs" in USA, there are a lot of them. I may imagine what they are, execept that sometimes the founder may have a special sense of humor and it may exactly the oposite about the name says... ;-)
When I reach the names origin, and historians, filologists and politicians take their part, I simply put my "hommmer Simpson" mind and try to imagine the simplest explanation. For new names... imagine the explorers .. for old names, as some rivers in Spain (Guadalquivir, Guadalete, ...) Guadal- came from the arab times.. "Guad Al" .. = River...
"I guess the best we can do is try not to make any maps we would be ashamed to sign our names to, although you might not always have that luxury if you don't work for yourself. As for mistakes the best we can do is try to catch them, correct them when we can, maybe in later editions, and in the end let go and move on to the next map. :)"
That's exactly the point ... Exactly this... hard.. snif...

Jean-Louis, that's interesting about river vs. big river - of course where I live "river" is, um, a rather nebulous concept. :lol: We have "rivers" like the Los Angeles River that are concrete channels for large portions. And we have rivers like the Santa Ana River near where I live that are mostly dry river beds most of the time. Around here we don't have anything that I think could be considered a "big river" year round, so the term wouldn't get much use. :P

EOSGIS, regarding translations - yeah, some place names shouldn't be translated. :) Even the local population doesn't translate them into the predominant language of the area. I thought the name California came from stories about a mythical land, California, ruled by Queen Califia. Apparently that's just one possibility. I didn't know another origin put forth by some people is that is comes from Catalan words that equate to "hot as an oven". I think the former is more likely. California isn't usually that hot unless it was named by someone who first encountered it out in the desert. :P But the lack of clear origins would make translation more difficult. ha!

Regarding "ownership" of maps - I think it would be next to impossible to make a living as a cartographer if you didn't compromise from time to time. Also, we all make mistakes on maps, omissions, typos, computer errors, etc. And once it's out of your hands there are more opportunities for others to make mistakes. I guess the best we can do is try not to make any maps we would be ashamed to sign our names to, although you might not always have that luxury if you don't work for yourself. As for mistakes the best we can do is try to catch them, correct them when we can, maybe in later editions, and in the end let go and move on to the next map. :)



#19
Gretchen Peterson

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Wow - so many little touches that round this out and make it extraordinary. Very nice to look at. Doesn't hurt that I just finished reading McCullough's "1776" either. I noticed the darkened vertical bar on the right-hand side-neat.

#20
Darren

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If it hasn't been mentioned, the dot for Halifax is in the wrong location. It should be farther south by about a centimetre, just below the inlet (Halifax Harbour).




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