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#1
EOSGIS

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To begin this New Year, I post a map of USA independence (Washington etc...). It was made for Hisotria NG.
Best regards
Fernando J Sanchez Menendez
EOSGIS SL
http://www.carto-grafia.com

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#2
s hubbard

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nicely done. i like the 'Muntes Apalaches'..
both sides of my family came in through those ports in Carolina, and Maryland.
s hubbard
www.hubbardmapworks.com
2539'

#3
DaveB

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Very nice! I like the legend block with inset and the coastal vignette effect. :)

I'm curious about some things, though - I see Neuva York and Nueva Jersey, but New Hampshire and New Haven. Seems there is a mix of English/American names and Spanish versions. Does New Inverness have some significance? I never heard of it before so I'm curious.
Dave Barnes
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#4
s hubbard

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i heard of new inverness alot growing up in georgia (and being scotch-irish), here's some links:

Darien, GA

Georgia Encyclopedia

if you ever have a chance to go to Cumberland Island, near there, it is amazing!
s hubbard
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2539'

#5
DaveB

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i heard of new inverness alot growing up in georgia (and being scotch-irish), here's some links:

Darien, GA

Georgia Encyclopedia

if you ever have a chance to go to Cumberland Island, near there, it is amazing!

Interesting. Thanks! :)
Name changed to Darien at some point. It's not clear from those articles exactly when the name was changed, but it sounds like it was pre-Revolution?
Dave Barnes
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#6
EOSGIS

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Hello Dave,
The names in English or Spanish, dependes on the Editors criteria, cartographic Thesaurus in Spain andand somewhat on the "Real Academia de la Lengua" criteria.
Long time ago (about 40 years ago) the rule was to translate always the origina languaje to Spanish, so New must be Nueva. But now, the critriais to translate just those geographical city names that has always been tranlated and has a Spanish version, i.e: London is Londres, Paris is París, Beijing is Pikin etc...
The other names depends upon editors / author preferences.
The same for Countries, England is Inglaterra, or other more strange Zimbawe is Zimbabue in Spanish, Bostwana is Bostbuana.
Today is a little complicated to work in cartographic names in Spain, since the rule relaxing and because whe have been revolving everything with treaties in European Community, United Nations etc, about thes. We have been re-inventing Spanish to accomplish it to other official Languajes inside Spain (Catalan, Vaque, Galician, Valancian,...) so ... my carthographers work is a little bit frustrating in this point. If I use the 400 years known names (New Jersey = Nueva Jersey) and the client dont like it, I can't say its a theasurus rule or anything, just .. let him say what he wants and that's all.
Thanks for the notes.

...

Very nice! I like the legend block with inset and the coastal vignette effect. :)

I'm curious about some things, though - I see Neuva York and Nueva Jersey, but New Hampshire and New Haven. Seems there is a mix of English/American names and Spanish versions. Does New Inverness have some significance? I never heard of it before so I'm curious.



#7
EOSGIS

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Hello Dave,
The names in English or Spanish, dependes on the Editors criteria, cartographic Thesaurus in Spain andand somewhat on the "Real Academia de la Lengua" criteria.
Long time ago (about 40 years ago) the rule was to translate always the origina languaje to Spanish, so New must be Nueva. But now, the critriais to translate just those geographical city names that has always been tranlated and has a Spanish version, i.e: London is Londres, Paris is París, Beijing is Pikin etc...
The other names depends upon editors / author preferences.
The same for Countries, England is Inglaterra, or other more strange Zimbawe is Zimbabue in Spanish, Bostwana is Bostbuana.
Today is a little complicated to work in cartographic names in Spain, since the rule relaxing and because whe have been revolving everything with treaties in European Community, United Nations etc, about thes. We have been re-inventing Spanish to accomplish it to other official Languajes inside Spain (Catalan, Vaque, Galician, Valancian,...) so ... my carthographers work is a little bit frustrating in this point. If I use the 400 years known names (New Jersey = Nueva Jersey) and the client dont like it, I can't say its a theasurus rule or anything, just .. let him say what he wants and that's all.
Thanks for the notes.

...

Very nice! I like the legend block with inset and the coastal vignette effect. :)

I'm curious about some things, though - I see Neuva York and Nueva Jersey, but New Hampshire and New Haven. Seems there is a mix of English/American names and Spanish versions. Does New Inverness have some significance? I never heard of it before so I'm curious.



#8
ceicher

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Hi,

I also think this looks really good!

-Pittsburg... if you intend the US spelling, then it is Pittsburgh

-The British advance from Quebec to Montreal to Lake Ontario followed the St. Lawrence River. This is a "big river" and I cannot see it because it is covered by the red advance line.

Best Regards,

-Cory

#9
EOSGIS

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Hello Cory,
"Pittsburg... if you intend the US spelling, then it is Pittsburgh"
Well, as I explaines earlier, today there's no official thesaurus about Geographical names in Spanish, or, if there is one, there's not directly available.
Pittsburgh, inpanish is written as in the map, or... it should be "Pittsburgo" or "Pitsburgo".. , the last "h" in Spanish has no sense...well, as cartographer, I leave these point to the editors and Hitorians, since along the years I have had to correct so many names like this one, that I ecided not to investigate more about this. The historian, author or editor has thes last word.
It's strange because as New vs Nueva, we write names as Johannesburg as Johasnnesburgo, but "J" in Spanish is like a hard "G" in English. And the "H" is silent in spanish, but in Johannesburg we pronuounce it... as you do...
Or Ohio, we say , as you do, Ojio.. but we write Ohio...
Another example is when writing Spanish citie names in English, Sevilla is Seville. But other names are written as in Spanish.
In English, there's sure a thesaurus about this.
Best regards,
Fernando J SAnchez Menendez
EOSGIS SL
http://www.carto-grafia.com

Hi,

I also think this looks really good!

-Pittsburg... if you intend the US spelling, then it is Pittsburgh

-Best Regards,

-Cory



#10
DaveB

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The whole realm of place names is fascinating to me. I've always been interested in place name origins. The "problem" of different languages and how they spell names from other languages is also interesting. And how to label place names on maps; not just label placement, but which version of a name to use. Now I'm learning a lot from this thread. :)
Dave Barnes
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#11
EOSGIS

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Hi Dave,
Yes , it's fascinating, but I hate it. sometme ago, I was interested about it, but I have more head aches than any other thing.
What I learned, when we where not "Global", spanish uses it's accepted names for places not spanish, that came from history (i.e: München is Munich, London = Londres, ...)
But now, cartographers depends not only about language, but in politics, so when China sys Beijing is Beijing, not Pekin... or Sri Lanka is no more Ceilán... we depend upon political issues.
Working as a cartographer not only teaches you about lines that are frontiers and that may be politically incorrect, but today, we must be careful about names that may be politically erroneous...
I hate this part of cartography job... :angry:
But it's fascinating too. The perfect map would be one with a double entrance for places... a huge huge job....
It would be interesting to hear other opinios from other carthographers of the forum since we are multi-national... multi-language...
Best regards
Fernando Sanchez Menendez
EOSGIS SL
http://www.carto-grafia.com

The whole realm of place names is fascinating to me. I've always been interested in place name origins. The "problem" of different languages and how they spell names from other languages is also interesting. And how to label place names on maps; not just label placement, but which version of a name to use. Now I'm learning a lot from this thread. :)



#12
François Goulet

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-The British advance from Quebec to Montreal to Lake Ontario followed the St. Lawrence River. This is a "big river" and I cannot see it because it is covered by the red advance line.


It's not covered, it's simply not there. You can see the Saint-Maurice and the Richelieu River ending to nothing...

Nevertheless, it don't take anything from the beauty of the map... I love it!! :)

#13
Dennis McClendon

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Handsome work, but the missing St. Lawrence River is bothersome. I think it would also be relevant to show the modern US-Canada border for context. I also wish for a little bit of leading in two-line colony names. And Rhode Island is so small that its label should be a little to the right, closer to Newport.
Dennis McClendon, Chicago CartoGraphics
chicagocarto.com

#14
Jean-Louis

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[quote name='Dennis McClendon' date='Jan 6 2010, 01:51 PM' post='29093']
Handsome work, but the missing St. Lawrence River is bothersome.

Yea, Fernando, the Saint Lawrence is a big object of Canadian Pride . Is this some kind of retaliation for that fishing dispute a few years ago.

A little trivia about place names in other languages:

Le fleuve St-Laurent. It is one of the shortcomings of English that it has no word like 'fleuve' to differentiate “river” and “really big river”. This conspicuous hole in the language incidentally, is also why the city of Buffalo, N.Y. has its awful name. It had nothing to do with the animal. “Buh-flew” was some slack-jawed American mispronunciation of 'Beau Fleuve' meaning “Beautiful (very big) River” rather than big hairy brown cow. Isn't there is an Italian expression that says something about translators being murderers.

Very nice work as usual. I,m still tripping on your silk route map.
Jean-Louis Rheault
Montreal


#15
EOSGIS

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Hello Dennis
Yes, St. Lawrence is missing... in the printed version (this is a scan from the magazine). I Sent the scan, because I only make the cartography, not the indesign templete / Design with the photos, large texts etc, but I think the final version is more informative than the map itsef. So, when I looked at the final map I have in my records, the river is ther.. so ... (deductive) I suppose that the people taht made the final version in the magazine just made a mistake and clear it when compising or making a change in the map.
The other issue about modern Borders or states dependes upon the article author and the magazine staff. They didnt want them, aswell as they didnt want any other state borders...
The leading issue, I would too prefer it. You are right.
Let me notice just a point about our cartographers work (this may begin a forum discussion them)....
"How far a carthographer that works for a magazine or publisher is the REAL owner and responsible of his work?"
I mean, its clear that I sign these maps. So I'm responsible for them. OK... Let me think a little bit about this... If a carthographer does not accept the client's criteria about contents and style. Can he have enough work?
It's a difficult lesson for carthography . Doesn't it?.
For me, it's clear that in the case I produce my own maps, the contents & style would be very different. And I would have errors too, and accept them and I will try to crrect them. (i.e: Rhode Island ;-) )
How many maps I have refused to sign or make because of absurd clients criteria once near to final version? Specially about political issues or font selection. Remember the book "How to lie with maps?"... I think we all can write a book on "How to manipulate maps, not to lie, but to accomplish client or audience"
It's a hard work this, .. :P


Handsome work, but the missing St. Lawrence River is bothersome. I think it would also be relevant to show the modern US-Canada border for context. I also wish for a little bit of leading in two-line colony names. And Rhode Island is so small that its label should be a little to the right, closer to Newport.






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