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Photoshop - Can using gradient fill count as one color?

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#1
MapMedia

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For my artwork, I can only use grayscale and one PMS color.


Can I still use a gradient fill (i.e. from PMS 640 to white)? Or do the shades count as separate colors?

#2
David Medeiros

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Are you asking because this will be done on a 2 color press? If so then I believe yes you can gradient your one spot color. The shades are a diffusion of the single color using a screen density, just as the black would be screened to various grays. But double check with the printer.

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#3
Matthew Hampton

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Assuming this is for print - it seems you are working on a two-color job using black ink and PMS 640. You can create a few different gradients, however not one from 100% PMS640 to white because you are not using white ink however you can use the white-black value to specify opacity in a mask. If you are just using a PMS color you can create a layer mask which will function as a gradient. In essence, you are adjusting opacity in a gradient fashion. As always, good communication with the printer will help ensure success.

For my artwork, I can only use grayscale and one PMS color.


Can I still use a gradient fill (i.e. from PMS 640 to white)? Or do the shades count as separate colors?


co-cartographic creator of boringmaps.com


#4
David Medeiros

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Assuming this is for print - it seems you are working on a two-color job using black ink and PMS 640. You can create a few different gradients, however not one from 100% PMS640 to white because you are not using white ink however you can use the white-black value to specify opacity in a mask.



Correct me if I'm wrong, but if he specifies the gradient color as his PMS color and ramps to white, this is in essence a constant screen of his single color right? White will be read by the printer (offset or laser) as a screen of the primary color going from 100% to 0%.

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#5
Matthew Hampton

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White will be read by the printer (offset or laser) as a screen of the primary color going from 100% to 0%.


It should work that way, but you should always check with the printer to make sure there aren't any surprises, and tell whoever uses your file how it's constructed. You might need to overprint the PMS gradient layer to knock-out the white.

co-cartographic creator of boringmaps.com





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