Jump to content

 
Photo

Erie Canal from Brockport to the Genesee River

- - - - -

  • Please log in to reply
13 replies to this topic

#1
Michael Karpovage

Michael Karpovage

    Master Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 173 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Roswell, GA
  • Interests:Making beautiful, functional maps
  • United States

http://www.mapformat...brockportNY.htm

Download the PDF at that link. Then you can zoom in to see all the crazy-ass detail I put into this map illustration - like the actual lights and flags on the bridges and apples in the trees.

This baby I actually did as a part time self-promotional piece that really got me started in the map illustration side of the business and eventually years later with Derek Tonn and mapformation. I was living in Rochester, NY at the time and visited all of the locations along the canal and took my own ground photography. No aerial references at all. I really wanted to present a WYSIWIG for people and boaters on the Canal and what they can expect in each segment. The actual illustration part was done in Photoshop way back from 1998-2001. I only recently in the last year did the design and layout of the poster in InDesign. I also handled all of the historical research and writing and design of the "fictitious" logo as well. Just today Derek posted this final version on our portfolio pages. When I was a dreamer I wanted to one day map the entire Erie Canal system just like this. :P

Hope you enjoy!

--
Michael Karpovage

• Savannah Historic District Illustrated Map
www.karpovagecreative.com/savannah

• Account Manager/Illustrator
Mapformation, LLC - Atlanta, GA office
www.mapformation.com

• Author of Map of Thieves
www.mapofthieves.com


#2
ceicher

ceicher

    Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPip
  • 44 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Charlottesville, Virginia
  • United States

Very pretty, and hits close to home as I was born and raised in Rochester (on the east side though).

I have always pondered the canal/river intersection. I think previously, when the canal ran farther north, it actually crossed above the river in an aqueduct.

-Cory

#3
Nick H

Nick H

    Legendary Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 307 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Caversham, Reading, England.
  • United Kingdom

A terrific map, it actually makes me want to go there! This is a very rare thing for a map to do.

I noticed a few typos to clean-up. 'A a result' in the heading; 'in constru-tion' in the LH column; perhaps it should be 'revolutionized agriculture by allowing farmers to harvest more quickly'. Where something in quotes ends a sentence it's usual to put the closing quotation mark before the full stop (um, period). Hope you don't mind me mentioning this.

Regards, N.
Caversham, Reading, England.

#4
DaveB

DaveB

    Hall of Fame

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,057 posts
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Location:Redlands, CA
  • United States

Where something in quotes ends a sentence it's usual to put the closing quotation mark before the full stop (um, period). Hope you don't mind me mentioning this.

Not sure if that is one of those rules that differs between the US and UK. What's the rule in the US? To me it seems more logical to include the period inside the quote if it's part of the quote. :)

Excellent map! I couldn't zoom in far enough to see any apples in the trees, though. :D
Dave Barnes
Esri
Product Engineer
Map Geek

#5
Michael Karpovage

Michael Karpovage

    Master Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 173 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Roswell, GA
  • Interests:Making beautiful, functional maps
  • United States

Nick, thanks for those catches, really. I fixed them and we'll get a new file posted soon. As you probably know the longer you work with something it is so hard to overlook little things like that when they are staring you in the face. This is really the first time anyone has even read this map so I do appreciate that feedback.

Ceicher, whereabouts in Rochester did you grow up? I grew up in Fairport. I remember attending beer ball parties along the canal towpath many a night! And then playing ice hockey on the canal when they lowered the level in the winter. And even jumping off the guard gates in the summer to cool off. We called it "scum jumping" as the canal wasn't exactly of pure waters! :P

--
Michael Karpovage

• Savannah Historic District Illustrated Map
www.karpovagecreative.com/savannah

• Account Manager/Illustrator
Mapformation, LLC - Atlanta, GA office
www.mapformation.com

• Author of Map of Thieves
www.mapofthieves.com


#6
ceicher

ceicher

    Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPip
  • 44 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Charlottesville, Virginia
  • United States

Hi Michael,

I grew up just next door in Penfield and attended PHS.

Without canal access, winters we played hockey on the area ponds. Summers I guess we just ran through sprinklers in the backyard.

A few years back at a gift shop in Fairport I bought an interesting print of a map of the complete Erie Canal which included a cross section. It showed really well the necessity for all those locks, most especially going over the Niagara Escarpment in... well, Lockport.

Nice to meet a fellow native Western Newyorker out there.

-Cory

#7
Michael Karpovage

Michael Karpovage

    Master Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 173 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Roswell, GA
  • Interests:Making beautiful, functional maps
  • United States

Hi Michael,

I grew up just next door in Penfield and attended PHS.

Without canal access, winters we played hockey on the area ponds. Summers I guess we just ran through sprinklers in the backyard.

A few years back at a gift shop in Fairport I bought an interesting print of a map of the complete Erie Canal which included a cross section. It showed really well the necessity for all those locks, most especially going over the Niagara Escarpment in... well, Lockport.

Nice to meet a fellow native Western Newyorker out there.

-Cory



Cory,

Not a few miles away -- Penfield and Fairport! That's awesome. I too have seen that cross section view of the Canal. It's amazing - the elevation changes.

There is sooooo much history attached to the Erie Canal. It was such an incredible engineering feat for its day. I really wanted to capture a stretch of the Canal in fine detail for today's users and then to also portray that history through text and images as well. So, when people are running down the old Towpath or pleasure boating they know they are traveling through history at the same time.

--
Michael Karpovage

• Savannah Historic District Illustrated Map
www.karpovagecreative.com/savannah

• Account Manager/Illustrator
Mapformation, LLC - Atlanta, GA office
www.mapformation.com

• Author of Map of Thieves
www.mapofthieves.com


#8
Adam Wilbert

Adam Wilbert

    Legendary Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 276 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Bellingham, WA, USA
  • United States

Thanks for providing the PDF. It certainly is detailed! I particularly like the little golf course and the cemetery.

Adam Wilbert

@awilbert
CartoGaia.com
Lynda.com author of "ArcGIS Essential Training"


#9
Pete

Pete

    Master Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 151 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Inverness
  • United Kingdom

I love the map - so much detail! You've got flags on your bridges and even the painted lines in your car parks :lol: ! The variety and detail of your textures is brilliant too.

The only thing I can spot - and it's because it happens in some of my maps - is you've got some trees overlapping buildings on the corner of Brockport-Spencerport Road and Sweden-Walker Road and just back from that on Owens Road. Fussy fussy fussy :lol: ! I lovingly refer to these sorts of trees in my work as "triffids". Some of the trees on the corner of Lake Road and Ridge Road look like they're overlapping the wrong way ... I'll leaf your trees alone now :rolleyes: ..!

You say you made the map illustration in Photoshop - does that mean your linear textures, fields and the like, are all based on scatter brushes? There's no obvious repeating patterns in any of them that I can see. It's really so well done!

#10
Michael Karpovage

Michael Karpovage

    Master Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 173 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Roswell, GA
  • Interests:Making beautiful, functional maps
  • United States

Pete, oh man! And I thought I was anal!!!! :P Those overlapping trees were actually intentional. Mind you a bit rough though too. Textures were done with brushes, yes. There is a special grass blade brush I use and then it's a matter of the rubber stamp tool as well to clone sections.

Yeah, this was one of those self-promo jobs that one spends WAY too much time and detail on and you don't know when to stop since I never had a deadline. And so I added things in like the flags and the correct lights on the bridges and even the correct structure of the lift bridges and the pedestrian paths from gravel to pavement. Even freakin flowers in the fields and crosses in the cemetery. Can you say "Where's Waldo?"! Crazy stuff but you know what, that's what makes this style unique and different from others - that level of detail that one can appreciate when they are walking or boating along the Canal. I was just so sick and tired of those inaccurate, god awful, cheesy, out of proportion, cartoony maps out there you see sometimes when it comes to visiting places and how that location is represented on a map....So, this was my way of raising the bar....... and all that time invested in detail completely paid off as I landed my first freelance campus mapping gig (pre-mapformation) as a direct result of this Erie Canal map. It was the SUNY Canton college campus and I charged $4,200 for that job. So, not a bad Return on Investment for a part time job! Here is the SUNY map:

http://www.mapformat...unycanton3D.htm

--
Michael Karpovage

• Savannah Historic District Illustrated Map
www.karpovagecreative.com/savannah

• Account Manager/Illustrator
Mapformation, LLC - Atlanta, GA office
www.mapformation.com

• Author of Map of Thieves
www.mapofthieves.com


#11
Pete

Pete

    Master Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 151 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Inverness
  • United Kingdom

Anal cartographers ... that's a whole other website :lol: !!

There's raising the bar and then there's your SUNY map. I think I'm going to have to re-evaluate my career as a maker of maps. I can see your style from the Erie Canal map coming through in this one but it's sooooo much more refined by comparison. The red trees are a neat touch and I like the way that the textures aren't wall-to-wall - it give the map a very clean and stylish look.

Do you place all of your trees manually in Photoshop? How long does it take you and what sort of file size do you end up with? A big map I recently finished of an outdoor centre had trees all over the place - the whole file was about 230mb but the linked files for trees and their shadows were about 100mb each. I must admit my trees are horribly primitive by comparison ... I drew a couple of different sorts of trees and then assigned them to scatter brushes with variation in size and spacing. It works up to a point but the repeating trees are really obvious and there simply isn't the same richness of texture that you have on display. I was going to show you but I've been overtaken by feelings of gross inadequacy :( - I have tree envy :lol: !

#12
Michael Karpovage

Michael Karpovage

    Master Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 173 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Roswell, GA
  • Interests:Making beautiful, functional maps
  • United States

I have tree envy :lol: !


LOL!!!!!

They don't call me Big Oak for nothin'!

My trees are placed manually as well as rubber stamped when clustered together. I pretty much clone them, resize them, adjust colors, textures, shadows. It actually goes quite fast. So, if you look close you will see repetitive patterns although I do make an effort to break that up. Again, this has evolved over time and as I've created more trees in my library I can fill up the forest with more variations that fit that particular geographic climate area too.

My files are monstrous in size to be frank. That's why I bought a new iMac so it can handle the load. As you know Photoshop files are rasterized and get incredibly huge. But in order to have fine detail that holds up to reproduction in print and larger poster sizes, and even large signage I have to have a large original file dimension to begin with. For instance, my typical map is usually like an 18x24" size at 300 dpi. So, they get real big real fast!!! But if a client wanted to blow it up even larger it won't become pixelated or blurry. That is why they must be so large - for that future potential use for clients.

That SUNY Canton map was based on ground image photos on took on location and a site plan map. Client supplied - outdated aerials were used pretty much for tree locations and general placement, but there was so much new construction on campus I needed to visit in person.

--
Michael Karpovage

• Savannah Historic District Illustrated Map
www.karpovagecreative.com/savannah

• Account Manager/Illustrator
Mapformation, LLC - Atlanta, GA office
www.mapformation.com

• Author of Map of Thieves
www.mapofthieves.com


#13
Pete

Pete

    Master Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 151 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Inverness
  • United Kingdom

LOL!!!!!

They don't call me Big Oak for nothin'!


MODERATOR!! :lol: :lol:

I see what you mean about cloning them: below the little bridge to the right of the vollyball pitch (?) (or to the right of the gigantic robot jelly molds!) there is a little downward sequence of little red tree, two fir trees, little green tree, big green tree, big red tree that repeats in the patch of woodland below it ... I really have to get out more!

I guess the more you do the easier it gets. My scatter brushes worked well enough for the first few time I tried rendering trees but as I get more ambitious in using them I find that they're not so good for larger maps with more detail - the file sizes gets pretty big but Illustrator seems to fall over with the complexity of the geometry and the shadows are a nightmare. I'll need to look into this Photoshop method for future projects ... and factor in a lot of time for experimentation!

#14
DaveB

DaveB

    Hall of Fame

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,057 posts
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Location:Redlands, CA
  • United States

Anal cartographers ...

Isn't that redundant? :lol: (I prefer "attention to detail", precision and accuracy) ;)
Dave Barnes
Esri
Product Engineer
Map Geek




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

-->