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#1
Nathanw

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Hi all,

I just found this forum five minutes ago and have already found something that I need to get some help on :) .

We are in the process of coming up with a new planning scheme for our council(fun fun), one of the things that I need to show is all the areas that are able to be applied with the "rural residential" zone. In order to make this map I have cut out all the areas that are covered by bush fire risk areas and good agricultural land use to get the remaining areas.

The map that I have come up looks like this(sorry for the low quality..only a draft):

Attached File  ZoningMap.JPG   83.55KB   162 downloads

Basically what I am trying to do is make the areas that are remaining(green in the map) stand out as much as possible while still showing the constraints, I have tried with different colors but I just can't get it to look right, the green(it doesn't have to be green) just seems to blend in.

Any feedback welcome.

Kind regards,
Nathan

#2
Crischan

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Have you tried using grays for the constraints? This way, the "good" land stands out while you can still show the constraints. You should just make sure that the map, when viewed in b/w still is readable!

For general color questions, try http://colorbrewer2.org/
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#3
David Medeiros

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I think you need to completely change the color scheme, the 3 colors you have are all vying for attention on the top level of your visual hierarchy. Since your Possible Rural Residential Areas are actually areas of no selection after applying the constraints, you could highlight the constraints with less intense colors (light natural green for Ag land, light muted orange for fire risk) and leave the Residential Areas as gray holes within the constraints. It’s a selection by de-selection in a sense and replicates visually the process used to identify these areas.

Alternatively, as suggested above, you could use two grays for your constraints and a milder highlight color for your residential areas. Ultimately the point here is highlight only one category, the constraints or the residential areas. Do your best to use more natural or lower intensity colors. Color Brewer is a great resource for GIS color palettes however it’s best suited to thematic or choropleth maps that must represent several categories of varying statistical information. Your map has only one theme of particular interest so all you have to do is bring it to the top of your visual hierarchy through differentiation.

Also check your spelling in the legend (I see Arg for what I assume is Ag? And Resudential), make sure your frames are neatly aligned and pull your polygons below and inside the neat-line (they appear above the neat line in lower left corner). Will you be adding any reference layers like major roads, rivers or towns?

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#4
Dennis McClendon

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Try a grayed green for the ag areas and a maroon-gray for the bush fire areas. Then residential areas in ocher or gold would come to the foreground.

But how can bush fire hazard areas be delineated in such minute detail? What's the scale of this map?
Dennis McClendon, Chicago CartoGraphics
chicagocarto.com

#5
heath b

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I've been working on something similar over the past year, as we are in the process of designating urban and rural reserves that can carry us into the next 40-50 years. I would agree that any non-candidate areas should have low saturation so that your possible rural residential areas can stand out. Purples and oranges are typical colors for urban designation. Also consider applying an outline stroke to candidate areas as your council begins to narrow down their proposed areas. The outline stroke will help highlight these areas. At the moment, though, there are so many fragmented areas that the outline stroke could get messy.

I agree that you need some roads and/or natural features in the map for reference as well.

Good work!

#6
Nathanw

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Thank you everyone for your feedback, I have taken it all on board and I am giving your suggestions a go.

My overall goal is to have a map that shows the remaining areas but also make it look like there is not lots of room for this zoning. So basically I'm looking for a color scheme that makes the map lie a little bit when it comes to showing how much remaining area there is, if that makes any sense. I'm not sure if this changes anything, I forgot to mention that in my original post.

Regarding the spelling, I noticed the mistakes just after I posted <_<, I am working on a second copy now with the new recommended color schemes with title, towns, and area boundaries and will post once I'm done.

Regards,
Nathan

#7
Dennis McClendon

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Indeed, this would seem like a prime candidate for generalizing by eye into more of a bubble diagram. Otherwise it suggests a false precision.
Dennis McClendon, Chicago CartoGraphics
chicagocarto.com

#8
Nathanw

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After trying a few different color schemes I came up with two different maps, the first one I did before I got feedback from this forum and the grey one I did after the feedback.

Before Feedback:

Posted Image

Grey:

Posted Image

Would love to hear peoples feedback.

Just note that I don't have control of the title or the legend wording, but I can change anything on the map. I also haven't added roads because this is mainly just a overview map and have used the towns to act as location indicators for the map.

Thanks,
Nathan

#9
David Medeiros

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After trying a few different color schemes I came up with two different maps, the first one I did before I got feedback from this forum and the grey one I did after the feedback.

Before Feedback:

Posted Image

Grey:

Posted Image

Would love to hear peoples feedback.

Just note that I don't have control of the title or the legend wording, but I can change anything on the map. I also haven't added roads because this is mainly just a overview map and have used the towns to act as location indicators for the map.

Thanks,
Nathan


Getting closer. In both examples I think your blue for the un-constrained areas needs to be changed to something else. I try to use blue for water features only to avoid any confusion. In the case of your maps it really makes the organically shaped polygons look like water. If I were working on this map I'd go with the 2nd version (with gray fills) but I would increase their relative saturation by 10% each at least. Beef up the blue in the water, change the blue for un-constrained to some other color, and bring its saturation down a bit more. Add major roads only in black, recolor the town names in black or very dark gray with thinner halos. Alter the boundary line to have a tighter dash gap pattern.

BTW, any chance this map is being made in GeoMedia?

GIS Reference and Instruction Specialist, Stanford Geospatial Center.

 

www.mapbliss.com

 


#10
Nathanw

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Getting closer. In both examples I think your blue for the un-constrained areas needs to be changed to something else. I try to use blue for water features only to avoid any confusion. In the case of your maps it really makes the organically shaped polygons look like water. If I were working on this map I'd go with the 2nd version (with gray fills) but I would increase their relative saturation by 10% each at least. Beef up the blue in the water, change the blue for un-constrained to some other color, and bring its saturation down a bit more. Add major roads only in black, recolor the town names in black or very dark gray with thinner halos. Alter the boundary line to have a tighter dash gap pattern.

BTW, any chance this map is being made in GeoMedia?


Thanks for the feedback, I'll give it a go. The maps are made using Mapinfo Pro 10.

#11
Nathanw

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Thanks everyone the input has really helped. The final map that I have come up with looks like this:

Posted Image


We have decided to use this map, however I would really like to see if there is anything that can be improved mainly just for my own learning.

#12
David Medeiros

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Thanks everyone the input has really helped. The final map that I have come up with looks like this:

Posted Image


We have decided to use this map, however I would really like to see if there is anything that can be improved mainly just for my own learning.


Looks much better. Easier to read. If you were going to spend any more time on it I would look at finding ways to clean up the small stuff.
1) There's some unusual geometry going on in the lower left portion of the map, looks like incomplete data or clipping issues.
2) The boundaries appear to have two lines; a thin stroke with short gap long dash. On top of that is a thicker line with short dash long gap, look odd.
3) All of your roads are the same line weight. You could select the major roads and highways and give them heavier lines or even a different color. Possibly name the most important ones.
4) Town name halos are a a little too large, may not be needed at all.
5) Layering issue, your intensive animal industry buffer's are on top of your green highlight areas (other layers may be ontop as well).
6) Color choices could be differentiated a bit more. I understand that the focus is on the "unaffected by constraints" but you my want to increase the contrast between the other groups as well... just a touch. And while I can more or less make the distinction between those colors on the map, they are very hard to see in the legend.
7) Judging from the road alignment I'm guessing north is not top of page but rotated to the right just a bit. I would rotate this back and bring north to top of page, add a N arrow and a scale.

I think you made some improvements and did a decent job of adding detail while keeping the visual noise down. HTH

Dave

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