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Map of the Future Revealed...

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#1
gregsd

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Ordnance Survey has been trialling the use of incredibly accurate lasers to create a spectacularly detailed map that could change the way the national mapping agency works and transform the way we think of maps forever.

Map of the Future


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#2
Nick H

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Point clouds; the OS have discovered point-cloud surveying. I can't wait for the way I think about maps to be changed for ever. Lord love us and save us, fiddling while Rome burns.

Sorry for the cynical tone but I'm one of the people who pays for all of this. I really do despair at the Ordnance Survey, they have no idea what they're for.

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#3
Esther Mandeno

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I really do despair at the Ordnance Survey, they have no idea what they're for.
Regards, N.


What do you mean Nick? Looks pretty cool to me...am I missing something?
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#4
dsl

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I might be missing something. But isn't that just lidar? That's been around since I was in uni, which much to my chagrin is getting farther and farther into the past. ..

Don't get me wrong though, these are really beautiful 3D models that they have created!

Thanks for sharing.

#5
Nick H

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What do you mean Nick? Looks pretty cool to me...am I missing something?

It's pretty enough, but it's just more data for the Ordnance Survey to hoard. They believe that data collected at the expense of the taxpayer over the decades is theirs. As one of those taxpayers I believe that data held by the Ordnance Survey is mine. People living in more enlightened parts of the world would be aghast if they knew how the regime operated by the Survey works in practice.

The very best Ordnance Survey vector mapping has problems of accuracy in areas like woodland that might not have seen a surveyor for perhaps eighty years (to my knowledge there are errors of about twenty metres in some of the mapping). When I see something like the Bournemouth point-cloud (with its accompanying PR BS) it makes me think that the Survey ought to be doing something about correcting errors in its existing data, rather than spending money elsewhere. But of course, this would not be an exciting, modern, cutting-edge thing to do.

Regards, N.
Caversham, Reading, England.

#6
Nick H

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I think they might have been hacked, or is Bournemouth really like that? If you click on the link in the first post in this thread and then go to the top map in the box on the right-hand side, have a look at the high-res image :) . Not me, honestly.

Regards, N.
Caversham, Reading, England.

#7
gregsd

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I think they might have been hacked, or is Bournemouth really like that? If you click on the link in the first post in this thread and then go to the top map in the box on the right-hand side, have a look at the high-res image :) . Not me, honestly.

Regards, N.


:D :D


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#8
Lui

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Hi!

Well I think that this can't be counted as a map. It is colorized LIDAR point cloud. I have to say that they did a fine job on that one. But still, this is not a map. I'm actually making maps using LIDAR data as main spatial data source. The results in forest area are impressive. Paths are clearly visible, terrain usually is not a problem,... Well maybe I'll just post a small image of map made from LIDAR data. It is a quick and dirty mix of unfinished vector map at scale of 1:5000 and hillshaded DSM. The other is just with DEM hillshading. Trivia. Colors are awful, I know :blink: I should spend some tima (that I don't have) to finish a map.

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#9
ceicher

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Yes. I saw this yesterday through this article.

http://www.gisuser.c...ent/view/18769/

My "take":

-Did you know the swiss national topographic office (swisstopo) has already undertaken the task of collecting 3D landscape data including very high resolution LIDAR for the whole country?

-That data is already being collected into a national topographic database. That data could support this kind of 3D visualization over a quite large area, not just one city. At the same time, it will soon support the production of cartographic digital data, thus supporting online cartographic representation and paper maps...

... in other words, maps and cartographic data are still pretty important here, and I think that's a good thing.

-Also, some excerpts from the gisuser article:

- "with quality three-dimensional mapping remaining the cartographic holy grail. "

I disagree. fully automated generalization is the cartographic holy grail. Furthermore, grails are overrated, hunting for them is at least frustratingly difficult, if not possibly stupid, and according to Monty Python, the French "have already got one".

-"If maps like the one created of Bournemouth are produced for the entire country "

It is not a map. it is a 3D visualization.

-"Map of the Future Revealed "

Actually, it is a Map of the PAST. Data in this type of database are never more current than objects in the real world. We'll probably solve that challenge around the same time we nail down the concept for a 1:1 scale map.

-Cory




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