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#1
bob_media

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I draw simple maps for a war gaming magazine either to illustrate troop movements or to provide the basis for an explanation of a war game scenario. In other words they are very illustrative and by their nature approximate.

I would be grateful if someone could outline the 'rules' of tracing maps to create illustrations such as mine so that I don't end up in a copyright dispute with the likes of the Ordinance Survey.

The explanation in Mapping it out by Mark Monmonier pp 138-156 is a good exposition but deals with the situation in the States.

Any advice, tips, and work around suggestions about the UK position would be greatly appreciated.

B:o)
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#2
Nick H

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I believe that copyright on OS maps expires after fifty years, so there shouldn't be a problem tracing from maps older than this. That said, I don't think the OS are in the business of making martyrs just at the minute (for reasons you might know about).

There are plenty of cheap, pre-1959 OS maps on the well-known Internet auction site and there are many reprints of old maps there too, which raises the question of any possible copyright on these. Does reprinting an old map start a new copyright running? It's very difficult to believe that it might.

Regards, N.
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#3
bob_media

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Thanks Nick for your reply and the implication that maps that are older than 50 years pass into the public domain and can be copied.

Can anyone shed further light on why this time period and any exceptions that may apply?

Best wishes

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#4
pghardy

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Thanks Nick for your reply and the implication that maps that are older than 50 years pass into the public domain and can be copied.

Can anyone shed further light on why this time period and any exceptions that may apply?
Best wishes, B:o)


Ordnance Survey is effectively a UK government organisation, and hence Crown copyright applies. Statutory Crown copyright started with the Copyright Act 1911. It established Crown copyright in those works: "prepared or published by or under the direction or control of His Majesty or any Government department." It says "A Crown copyright work which has been published will have copyright protection for 50 years from the end of the year in which the work was published." See
http://www.opsi.gov....crown-copyright

Note that this 50-year period is only for UK governmental mapping such as Ordnance Survey (or LPS Northern Ireland). Outside of government the more general copyright rules apply. For published map products these typically have duration 70 years after the death of the creator, or if the creator is unknown then 70 years after the date of publishing. See
http://www.copyright...k_copyright_law
and
http://www.ipo.gov.uk/cdpact1988.pdf (334 pages of the definitive rules!)

Note that I am not a lawyer, nor a copyright expert, and the above is my personal opinion (nothing to do with ESRI!). Read the documents to get the true situation.
--
Paul Hardy
ESRI Europe (phardy@esri.com)

#5
bob_media

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Paul,

Thank you for this fulsome explanation and authorities. A great response and one worth 'book marking'. I hope others will find your response helpful too.

B:o)
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