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#46
Unit Seven

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A related question:

Can anybody recommend a (preferably freeware) font-manager for Windows? I have a lot of fonts installed that I hardly ever use, by moving those outside of the Windows\Fonts directory I can save some time starting up Illy. Easy enough to do manually, but I was wondering if there's anyting out there that can make it easier.


I like The Font Thing B) Is that what you are looking for?


Only seems to manage True Type fonts. Most of what I've read still points to Adobe ATM deluxe as the best choice here, even tho its not continued by Adobe. Linotype released the free Font Explorer X for the mac which I've heard a lot of people rate and is prob a good thing it's by a type foundry and they did have something on there page about a PC version in the future but haven't heard anything else about it.

Well I guess that's not much much help in hindsight...I have heard people say Typograph (freeware) is a good choice but can't recomend myself as I haven't used, looks like it has some good font management tools. Can store all the fonts in it's own database, what cd they are on etc...

Let us know what you find Hans.
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#47
natcase

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*bump*

Anybody here ever use "Glypha"? It's a serif font designed by Adrian Frutiger and it's one of the recommendations from Typebrewer. Been contemplating getting it, as I'm still looking for a nice serif font to work alongside Frutiger.

Oh, and I bumped this thread, because I think it contains a lot of useful information.


Yeah, we use it for curved area type in our campus series (see sample). I was inspired to use it by ano ld (late 1940's I think) Philadelphia trolley system map I was very taken by. On the campus area maps we use Avenir roman and Medium, and Helvetica Bold.

We also use Sabon with Fruitiger (we go back and forth between Avenir and Frutiger for our main sans type font), also often Minion. Experimented with Myriad recently and liked the condensed font (see samples here)

Nat Case
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maphead.blogspot.com



#48
Dennis McClendon

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Yes! Now there's a good use for square-serif type: so the lowercase can be letterspaced across an areal feature. Ordinarily I'm opposed to letterspacing lowercase type on principle, but the square serifs help to occupy the territory, so to speak.
Dennis McClendon, Chicago CartoGraphics
chicagocarto.com

#49
sean

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Thinking out loud here! In placing road name type in extremely dense urban areas, I have often wondered if there is an optimal font. I often use a condensed Helvetica, but have been told that many folks find Universal to be much easier to read.... thoughts?

#50
Hans van der Maarel

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Thinking out loud here! In placing road name type in extremely dense urban areas, I have often wondered if there is an optimal font. I often use a condensed Helvetica, but have been told that many folks find Universal to be much easier to read.... thoughts?


I've moved your post to this thread...

Don't know about an 'optimal' font per se. I've used a condensed Frutiger for such occasions, but I think a condensed Helvetica or Univers would be just as good.
Hans van der Maarel - Cartotalk Editor
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#51
Paul H

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In extremely tight areas, where you need to reduce your point size to a minimum, I have found Helvetica Condensed to be a better choice when compared to Univers. The ratio of x-height to ascent height is greater with Helvetica, so lower case letters will be a little bit bigger.

#52
Hans van der Maarel

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Been on the lookout for other fonts suitable for mapping, and this one caught my eye:
Dokument

Comes in a wide range of widths/styles, including condensed and extra condensed.
Hans van der Maarel - Cartotalk Editor
Red Geographics
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#53
Charles Syrett

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Nice. I think if Gill Sans and Futura had a kid, it would look something like this. :rolleyes:

Charles Syrett
Map Graphics
http://www.mapgraphics.com

Been on the lookout for other fonts suitable for mapping, and this one caught my eye:
Dokument

Comes in a wide range of widths/styles, including condensed and extra condensed.



#54
Casey Greene

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Does anyone have a font that they dislike, but have had to use at one time or anthor?

-Casey Greene
(cbgreene17@yahoo.com)
Casey Greene - Cartographer - Adventure Cycling Association
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#55
lll

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We have some traditions of map fonts in Hungary. Fonts of man-made feature names (settlements, administrative units) usually are sans serif, grotesque. Geographical features (rivers, mountains, etc.) have serifs. I think that extended types or simple Courier types are good for historical place names. I hate Times New Roman on maps:)
LLL

#56
Casey Greene

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Just used Calibri for the first time, and its not bad. I didn't realize though that it was the new default on MS Office 07, meaning that soon it will probably be everywhere like arial and wal-mart.

Calibri does look decent though. It has this sort-of deceiving roundness to it that makes it look like a humanistic-five-generation-removed relative of comic sans. Ok, maybe not a direct relative, but it at least married in from the Lucida family.

The only thing i don't like is how the lower-case asenders extend way past the upper case characters. This, with the roundness, makes it look slightly cartoonish at times.

Here is a sample of "Calibri Regular":
Attached File  calibri_reg.png   1.59KB   67 downloads

To see it in a map, check out my "big island mapp" in the "Map Gallery" forum

-Casey Greene
(cbgreene17@yahoo.com)

ps. to answer my own question: comic sans is terrible.
Casey Greene - Cartographer - Adventure Cycling Association
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#57
Unit Seven

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A new challenge for me has been fonts for use on web maps, where at small sizes only a few pixels have to communicate the character shape. So I've experimented with the fonts, such as Verdana, that web browsers introduced, figuring they had been optimized for readablity in pixels rather than ink.



Ok and this sparked my memory of the web fonts I have used a lot to get a lot of info in a small space.

The key is to turn anti-aliasing off in the font rendering as while it is designed to make fronts look nicer at very small sizes it makes them blurry.
Photoshop has a setting for this and I thgnk Flash now does as well. Your right tin that fonts such as Verdana and Georgia are designed for this use and both work really well at 9 point if you use this ani aliasing trick.

There are small pixel fonts designed for jsut this use - the Mini-7 family being the smallest you can get a typeface - 7pt at 72ppi which is only 5 pixels high yet still readable if renedered as designed. The trick is these sometimes have to make sure you are aligning these to your pixels and have the leading set to the same as the font size.

Not a great explanation but here's what they look like when done correctly—small and clear.

Attached Files


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#58
Hans van der Maarel

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Just wondering, does anybody have The Font Book?
Hans van der Maarel - Cartotalk Editor
Red Geographics
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#59
frax

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Sounds like something that would be neat to have. So that one can overdose on fonts, when needed.

Maybe when my clients have paid their bills, and I am done with all the purchasing in the queue...
Hugo Ahlenius
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#60
Matthew Hampton

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Does anyone have a font that they dislike, but have had to use at one time or anthor?

-Casey Greene
(cbgreene17@yahoo.com)


I used Papyrus for a set of maps once, then I kept on seeing it everywhere! Now I dislike it as much as ComicSans. It's a neat ornamental font but it's soooo overused (at least in the NW) that if I had a dollar for every massage therapist, winery, and cafe that used it, I could retire.

Could we ever arrange a "font recall?" I think there is already a good website devoted to killing Comic Sans.

co-cartographic creator of boringmaps.com





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