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Creative Force Maps Releases Expansive Vector Map Symbol Library


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#1
JRF

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Creative Force, a leading provider of royalty-free digital maps, has compiled over 20 years of map symbols into a single location. This collection will save you lots of time when customizing your digital map.

Featured in the library:
300+ editable map symbols
Highly detailed, yet still recognizable at small sizes
Scale to any size
Make any color(s).
Replace symbols in one step
Available in vector Adobe Illustrator format for $29.

If you cannot find what you need in the library collection, our map technicians can quickly design versatile custom map symbols for your project. Whatever is most important to you, such as your store locations, should beautifully jump right out of the map.

For more details, visit www.creativeforce.com (see Other Maps tab) or call 800-822-6331

#2
David Medeiros

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If you cannot find what you need in the library collection, our map technicians can quickly design versatile custom map symbols for your project.


What's a "map technician"? ;)

GIS Reference and Instruction Specialist, Stanford Geospatial Center.

 

www.mapbliss.com

 


#3
Charles Syrett

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What's a "map technician"? ;)


Back in the mists of time, when I worked as a cartographer in the Ontario government, there were two kinds of workers there: "cartographers" and "technicians". The cartographers (usually male, and many imported from the Ordnance Survey in UK), did the compilation, design, and project control. The technicians (almost exclusively female, and trained in-house) were the ones who scribed the maps, peeled the peelcoats, and opaqued the negatives. Technicians were not allowed to advance and become cartographers, unless they went to school and earned some sort of diploma or degree in cartography. This was a source of frustration for some of the technicians, who felt that after some years there they had developed skills that surpassed those of the incoming cartos!

I'm sure Jolan is using the term "technician" very differently, though. :rolleyes: These icons actually look pretty good.

Charles Syrett
Map Graphics
http://www.mapgraphics.com




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