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Golf hole depiction. Critique and help

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#1
CharlieG

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I'm trying to do a poster that depicts a bunch of holes from different golf courses. I'm thinking a 24"x36" poster. I want to show some of the strategy of the hole as well as describe the ground contouring. Rather than use topographic contour lines I thought I might use a hybrid as I've done in the image I've attached. The short lines basically run perpendicular to the topo lines. I've seen this method used before and it seemed to me that it might be easier to understand than topographic lines. Plus it might be a bit less busy (the images probably wouldn't be quite as large as shown).

So, what do you think, and what other ways to depict small-scale topography exist? It would have to work in Black/White rather than use color or grayscale gradients.

Thanks in advance,

Charlie
Attached File  Sleepy_Hollow_8.jpg   134.36KB   308 downloads

Edited by CharlieG, 27 September 2009 - 04:17 PM.


#2
Hans van der Maarel

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I think the attachment went wrong somehow... Could you try again?
Hans van der Maarel - Cartotalk Editor
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#3
CharlieG

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I think the attachment went wrong somehow... Could you try again?



Hopefully this works. Sorry about the missing attachment.

Attached File  Sleepy_Hollow_8.jpg   134.36KB   145 downloads

#4
frax

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Hi,
It is not obvious for me if it is sloping up or down, is that what the arrows show? For these super large-scale maps with gentle slopes, I think you might want to consider using some kind of shaded relief (maybe painted?) or more contours. Now it looks like it is terraced, and it doesn't really communicate the rolling/gentle sloping up and down (I assume there are no steep cliffs in the golf-course!)
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#5
Esther Mandeno

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Hello Charlie,

This is a very interesting depiction of terrain. I don't quite get it, but I do like the overall look of what you are going after. For those of us who have never golfed, do the rectangular boxes represent raised platforms where a golfer would hit the ball from? Correct? And their target would be the farthest blob (with the sand pit just to the right)?

If the arrows indicate down slope direction, then I think the representation is clear. However, from a map perspective, contour lines would make more sense to me. Subtle hill shade is nice too but you may not want to go there as you would lose that clean look.

Just my two cents worth. Nice job so far.
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#6
CharlieG

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Esther and Frax, Thanks for the comments.

Yes the rectangular boxes at the top are the tee boxes where the hole starts and the blob at the bottom is the green where the hole ends.

Rather than try to explain quite how the hash marks work, I'll overlay the topo lines with some (hastily made) labels. You'll see the blue lines are a 5-foot contour interval with a few red lines thrown in to show where I added detail. The red lines are at no particular elevation, they're just there to show that an area has a bit more "worthwhile" detail. After you see these lines perhaps it will make more sense, and maybe it will give you some ideas for depicting this kind of topography.

Thanks again,

Charlie

Attached File  Sleepy_Hollow_contours.jpg   365.12KB   146 downloads

#7
Dennis McClendon

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This technique is known as hachuring, and there's a lot more to it than having perpendicular lines along the contours. Take a look at Eduard Imhof's book Cartographic Relief Presentation, republished two years ago by ESRI Press.

For your project, I think hachuring will work reasonably well to show dramatic dropoffs, such as from an elevated tee or the drop away from a green into a sand trap. It won't work well to show rolling hills, the situation you will have on a lot of courses.
Dennis McClendon, Chicago CartoGraphics
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#8
MapMedia

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If you have contours, I image drawing your own relief in Photoshop would be effective way of showing undulations while keeping the map clear and clean for other lines (rough, fareway, green, and traps) - sorry if my lingo is off - I can only say I have played gold on the Wii. :)

#9
Boundary Maven

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I think it works really well. I might make the slope arrows a bit more prominent, and I would add a little stippling to the area outside the fairway to show that it's the rough. What about a little flag to depict where the hole is, and a tee for the tee shot area? Overall, I think it's very clean and well presented.

#10
Andrew

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Charlie,

I like it and I think it works well!

I am a mad golfer and this style is consistent with the many many many golf course guides which I collect. As Dennis mention this technique is in the Eduard Imhof book, with some good examples.

Generally why this is used in Golf course guides or representations of a particular hole is that golfers are not interested in the exact elevation or lots of contours they are only interested in the lay of the land. So in other words if I hit my ball over there where is it going end up rolling to? I think this technique is perfect for that.

Golfers suffer from paralysis by analysis, keeping it clean and simple like this is the way to go!

One bit of feedback though, around the tee box I think the tree which comes over the tee area should be altered so it doesn't encroach on the teeing area ( a little bit of poetic license you could say). I think you only need to show the tree is there beside the tee not over hanging, it just cleans that area up a little I think.

Nice job.

Andrew

#11
Esther Mandeno

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Rather than try to explain quite how the hash marks work, I'll overlay the topo lines with some (hastily made) labels.


Ah, that makes sense now. I have seen this before but since it's very unfamiliar to me, I don't get the lay of the land from those hatch marks. Apparently, as Andrew stated, it's common for golfers so I would go with that.

Thanks for adding the flag! Only thing, maybe make it a bit smaller?

Good luck with this project - it's looking great.
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Esther Mandeno
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#12
CharlieG

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Thanks all for the input, I'll post more images in time when I get the poster design firmed up. A bit of additional background. The golf holes that I'm depicting are a collection of the best holes designed by A.W. Tillinghast in the early part of the 20th century. It's meant more as an educational thing (for people interested in golf history/design) that might be used as a fund-raiser for the Tillinghast society.

Thanks again,

Charlie

#13
Nick H

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Oh, don't forget the lat/lon coordinates for the holes! I know that some of the golfing persuasion carry GPSs, along with EDMs and Lord knows what else. Total stations I expect :).

Very nice maps, by the way.

Regards, N.
Caversham, Reading, England.

#14
E Nile

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The cartography is clean and neat. Although I'm not sure I would know which end of a Golf bat to hold wouldn't it be good to show 'out of bounds' areas?
Perhaps a gray mask for the out of bounds areas?

#15
CharlieG

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I thought I'd post an update to this project and perhaps solicit additional critiques/ideas. The content will probably end up being used in a number of places, but one such place might be individual hole posters. I've created one that I wanted to have the appearance of a blueprint, but also look like something someone might display. The hatchures are not what I would describe as the traditional type because I don't want too much information so as to be confusing. Oh, and I forgot to put a scale on there, so that will eventually be part of the finished product. Aside from the critiques, how might some of you try to depict something like this?

Thanks,

Charlie

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