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DEM for 1:500,000 map

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#1
Dennis McClendon

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I just had a guy walk in off the street and commission a wall-sized map of Kashmir. Apparently he's a Salman Rushdie fan and wants to see the places being written about.

This is an unfamiliar type of mapmaking to me, and I'm wondering. Will SRTM be sufficient quality for a 1:500,000 map? Is there Mac software for merging the SRTM tiles and creating shaded relief, or would I be better off doing this in ArcGIS and then moving the TIF or JPG to the Mac?
Dennis McClendon, Chicago CartoGraphics
chicagocarto.com

#2
Charles Syrett

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I'm not very familiar with Arc yet -- just got it a few months ago -- but my version comes with SRTM relief images, and the 90m resolution should work well with your 500K scale. I would just use Arc, save as tiff, and then open it on the Mac -- never mind tiling.
Nice project. B)

Charles Syrett
Map Graphics
http://www.mapgraphics.com

I just had a guy walk in off the street and commission a wall-sized map of Kashmir. Apparently he's a Salman Rushdie fan and wants to see the places being written about.

This is an unfamiliar type of mapmaking to me, and I'm wondering. Will SRTM be sufficient quality for a 1:500,000 map? Is there Mac software for merging the SRTM tiles and creating shaded relief, or would I be better off doing this in ArcGIS and then moving the TIF or JPG to the Mac?



#3
Dennis McClendon

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Well, I had forgotten that ArcGIS won't do shaded relief. You have to have an expensive Spatial Analyst add-on, apparently.

Any thoughts about how to get from SRTM to a shaded relief TIFF without buying anything very expensive?
Dennis McClendon, Chicago CartoGraphics
chicagocarto.com

#4
Charles Syrett

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Well, that's funny....in my version of Arc, there are only the relief renderings, but no DEM data....I'd much rather have the data and make my own relief shading! I would project it in any GIS (I still like Global Mapper), and then use Surfer or even Photoshop for the rendering. Both Global and Surfer are under $500.

Charles Syrett
Map Graphics
http://www.mapgraphics.com


Well, I had forgotten that ArcGIS won't do shaded relief. You have to have an expensive Spatial Analyst add-on, apparently.

Any thoughts about how to get from SRTM to a shaded relief TIFF without buying anything very expensive?



#5
Fran├žois Goulet

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Well, I had forgotten that ArcGIS won't do shaded relief. You have to have an expensive Spatial Analyst add-on, apparently.

Any thoughts about how to get from SRTM to a shaded relief TIFF without buying anything very expensive?


In you layer properties, in the Symbology tab, you can choose to display a hillshade effect... It don't give results as best as you could have using specialized software, but still useful...

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#6
dsl

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If you are considering Arc, then you obviously have windows. Use Global Mapper for this. You can do everything in that, including downloading the SRTM directly into the program just by drawing a box around your area of interest. You can export a greyscale shaded relief as geotiff, jpg, and png, or the DEM as a PGM file. It will cost around 200$, but I think it is a great investment. I'm sure others on the list can vouch for how useful it is.

I just downloaded some SRTM the other day, and I think it will be of great quality for that scale. It seems to have been cleaned up substantially, because when I downloaded some a year ago there were numerous little bumps and "errors".

Hope that helps.

#7
Nick H

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...Any thoughts about how to get from SRTM to a shaded relief TIFF without buying anything very expensive?


Without buying anything :rolleyes:. If you download the SRTM data as a TIFF you could load it into 3DEM, which allows shaded relief surfaces to be built and exported as TIFFs. From 3DEM you can also export the data as a USGS ASCII DEM, which can be loaded into Landserf for projecting and more controlled rendering. You'll love Landserf.

http://freegeography...-available-here
http://www.landserf.org/

Regards, N.
Caversham, Reading, England.

#8
David Medeiros

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Well, I had forgotten that ArcGIS won't do shaded relief. You have to have an expensive Spatial Analyst add-on, apparently.

Any thoughts about how to get from SRTM to a shaded relief TIFF without buying anything very expensive?


I use Natural Scene Designer. The cheap version is $140, the Pro is $329. Main difference is that pro allows you to re-project your images. Very easy to use program and well worth the price IMO.

http://www.naturalgfx.com/index.htm

GIS Reference and Instruction Specialist, Stanford Geospatial Center.

 

www.mapbliss.com

 


#9
Hans van der Maarel

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Since we're listing alternatives here...

Avenza's Geographic Imager for Photoshop. The latest version supports elevation data. It does rely on Photoshop's 3D handling stuff, which is somewhat clunky imho.
Hans van der Maarel - Cartotalk Editor
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#10
Dennis McClendon

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If you download the SRTM data as a TIFF you could load it into 3DEM, which allows shaded relief surfaces to be built and exported as TIFFs. From 3DEM you can also export the data as a USGS ASCII DEM, which can be loaded into Landserf for projecting and more controlled rendering.


Thanks, but I can't seem to figure out how to do this. 3DEM doesn't appear to have any way to merge adjacent tiles. The help file says you can Open more than one TIF file at a time, but I can't figure out how.

Same thing with Landserf. I can open adjacent tiles and they show up in the sidebar, but I can't find any command to merge them together.
Dennis McClendon, Chicago CartoGraphics
chicagocarto.com

#11
Nick H

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Hi Dennis,

MicroDEM is said to be able to merge DEMs across UTM Zones. I haven't played with this software so I don't know much about it, but it looks interesting and might be worth a butcher's:

http://www.nadn.navy...te/microdem.htm

Regards, N.
Caversham, Reading, England.




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