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Bing's Bird's Eye View

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#1
Greg

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I was floored by this new Bird's Eye feature of Microsoft's bing maps..

I would love to know how all of these aerial shots were seamed and compiled into this unthinkably massive database!
Some cities are higher res then others.

If you haven't seen this, it's well worth checking out! find your house, and rotate around it! I can see the canoe in my backyard. :)

If anyone has any details on how this is accomplished, I would love to know.

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#2
klacefield

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The only insight that I can give is that the oblique photography is through a company called Pictometry (http://www.pictometry.com)
Kevin Lacefield, GIS Programmer Analyst
County of Sonoma
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#3
Matthew Hampton

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These obliques have been around for several years. Captured by Pictometry and served-up via Microsoft's geo-apps (LiveSearch, LiveLocal, VirtualEarth, etc., etc.) that they have now re-named "Bing."

I am not too hot on the name - but I hope they stick with it and not try to change it next year to "zing" or something.

Pictometry has an annual conference every year called Futureview. This year it's Oct 18th-21st. I've never been, but I really like the oblique's. They are great for creating really quick 'n dirty Tilt-Shift images.

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#4
jrat

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Pictometry did a presentation at FedUC this year. they fly a camera with five cameras. Each lense has a flat field focus. This allows them to determine the angle and distance to any pixel on the image from the altitude and GPS location of the plane. The High res 3D buildings are the result of this technology. They mentioned that they can create the 3d models overnight. They are also working with the military to attach their cameras on the drone aircraft so they can use them in mission planning. Kind of scary stuff. They market alot to first responders who like the ability to get a 360 view of any emergency. There are a couple of other companies out there doing similar things. If you like being able to look at your house like this; make sure to send a thankyou card to the local governments cause their the ones who paid for it.

#5
jrat

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I also heard they went with BING, Because Its Not Google. :)

#6
rudy

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I would love to know how all of these aerial shots were seamed and compiled into this unthinkably massive database!
Some cities are higher res then others.


Definitely an improvement over street view, especially with regards to verifying map information. The images, however, are not so seamless. Check out these two or adjoining areas - notice how the angle changes.
Attached File  west.jpg   215.56KB   51 downloadsAttached File  east.jpg   248.46KB   49 downloads

#7
Dennis McClendon

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Not sure how oblique views with perspective could possibly be made "seamless."

At any rate, I've found them invaluable for the past couple of years. I'm astonished how few people seem to know about them, and about the corresponding map service, which is good looking and still uses NavTeq data (vastly superior for North America). Laymen always ask me about Google Earth and Street View, but never about Bing.
Dennis McClendon, Chicago CartoGraphics
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#8
Matthew Hampton

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Laymen always ask me about Google Earth and Street View, but never about Bing.


I think that's b/c Microsoft has completely bungled the marketing for there product over that last 6 years. I can count at least 5 different name variations for their "Google-like" map service.

Perhaps that's the driving factor for the monosyllabic and esoteric "Bing." At least it's rememberable and dissimilar enough to their previous product names. Finally.

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#9
natcase

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Definitely an improvement over street view, especially with regards to verifying map information. The images, however, are not so seamless. Check out these two or adjoining areas - notice how the angle changes.

Well, they're useful for different things. For one thing, it's usually hard to read street-level signage on Street view, but it's nearly impossible except for the biggest big-box signs using Bing's birds eye.

I go back and forth amongst Bing's aerial and bird's eye views, and Google's satellite and street views. They each tell their own useful story, and each have different date of recording. You never know from one to the next which will have the most current data. It's especially disconcerting when adjacent bird's eye views in a construction zone are from different flights... hey, where'd that building go!

But amongst them, what a savings in field work time!... not that time on the ground for truly up-to-date information isn't still essential. But it sure helps when field work is impossible or outside the budget, or for preliminary passes even when field work is part of the project

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#10
Jean-Louis

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I love the Microsoft maps.
my favorite feature is how you can 3D navigate the map view in addition to the satellite view. I find this very useful and non-existant in Google
I had a PC for a couple of months but I am now back on the Mac and that feature does not work
Does anyone know if you can activate the 3D of Bing on a Mac ?
Jean-Louis Rheault
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#11
Hans van der Maarel

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I had a PC for a couple of months but I am now back on the Mac and that feature does not work
Does anyone know if you can activate the 3D of Bing on a Mac ?


Apparently you need a Windows machine for the 3D verions, it'll only work in IE and...

Bing Maps 3D is currently supported in Canada, France, Great Britain, Japan, and the United States. Check back later to see if Bing Maps 3D has been released in your country or region.


Bird's eye view works fine in Firefox on a Mac though.
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#12
Jean-Louis

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Bird's eye view works fine in Firefox on a Mac though.
[/quote]
Yes it does, unfortunately they dont have Kamloops done in bird's eye which is where I am and working on.
( Yes Hans, as prophesied I,m right in the process of doing your exact trip in reverse mirror-image)

but for the 3D map feature which only works on Windows, Isnt there a mac feature where you can switch to a PC mode?
Is that native to only a special Mac hardware or is it a feature you can install?
Jean-Louis Rheault
Montreal


#13
Nick H

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Definitely an improvement over street view, especially with regards to verifying map information. The images, however, are not so seamless. Check out these two or adjoining areas - notice how the angle changes.
Attached File  west.jpg   215.56KB   51 downloadsAttached File  east.jpg   248.46KB   49 downloads


Interesting, you'd have thought that these pictures would have been taken within seconds of each other during one run. But the shadows tell a different story.

Regards, N.
Caversham, Reading, England.

#14
Hans van der Maarel

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Interesting, you'd have thought that these pictures would have been taken within seconds of each other during one run. But the shadows tell a different story.


Some spots I've looked at seem to have photos taken at totally different days. I would imagine they'd fly an up-and-down pattern like with oblique aerial photography (or even do this along with obliques)
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#15
Dennis McClendon

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Well, but it's best if the sun is behind you (though obviously that's seldom possible for the south-facing views). So the obliques seem to be flown in different passes rather than a back-and-forth pattern the way planimetrics are done. (Hans, birds-eye is the same as oblique. Planimetric is the word for straight-down aerials.)
Dennis McClendon, Chicago CartoGraphics
chicagocarto.com




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