Jump to content

 
Photo

Mapping American Toponymy

- - - - -

  • Please log in to reply
15 replies to this topic

#1
Rick Dey

Rick Dey

    Legendary Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 302 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Santa Rosa, CA
  • Interests:Illustrator, MAPublisher, GIS, Street Maps
  • United States

From ccablog, add a new word to your vocabulary.

http://pfly.net/?p=26
Rick Dey

#2
Nick Springer

Nick Springer

    CartoTalk Founder Emeritus

  • Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 939 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Crosswicks, NJ
  • Interests:Cartographic Design, Print Maps, Graphic Design, Web Development, Ultimate Frisbee
  • United States

Very interesting. I have always found place names facinating.

Nick Springer

Director of Design and Web Applications: ALK Technologies Inc.
Owner: Springer Cartographics LLC


#3
Martin Gamache

Martin Gamache

    Ultimate Contributor

  • Associate Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 980 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Washington DC
  • Interests:History of Topographic Cartography
    Topographic Mapping
    History of Relief Depiction
    Thematic Cartography
    Demographic Cartography
    Cartographic techniques, methods, and tools
    Orienteering
    Panoramic & Kite Photography
  • United States

The print version of the Swiss Atlas has several interesting maps of this type, looking at names and pronounciations for common rodents across switzerland, architectural terms and words for articles of clothing as well if I remember correctly.

#4
EcoGraphic

EcoGraphic

    Master Contributor

  • Links Moderator
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 241 posts
  • Location:Okanagan Valley, BC
  • Interests:landscape architecture,cartography,information architecture,wayfinding,landscape archaeology,cultural landscapes,sustainable design,visual journalism,travel writing,photography,illustration,languages
  • Canada

For Canadians there are several good books on place names:

Naming Canada: Stories about Canadian place names

Some of the stories in this one are hilarious:

1001 British Columbia Place Names

British Columbia coast names, 1592-1906

Canadian Place Names, various titles

Cheers,

Gillian
Gillian Auld
EcoGraphic Design
www.EcoGraphic.ca

Design is the intermediary between information and understanding
Richard Grefe

#5
Mike H

Mike H

    Master Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 168 posts
  • Location:State College, PA
  • United States

Thanks for the link - I love place names, and maps of place names are even better! I'm looking into some of his questions about Maine lake/ponds - we are working on a few place name project maps anyway.

I have 2 other books by George Stewart - American Place names (1970) and Names on the Globe (1975) Both are really neat. I don't have his earlier work that was mentioned.

in Maine the Passamoquoddy Tribe has compiled a really nice CD with native place names, in an interactive audio map format. It's a well done piece. Not accesable on-line as a demo, but for purchase go here:

http://www.wabanaki....lacenamesCD.htm

m.
Michael Hermann
mike [at] purplelizard.com


www.purplelizard.com

#6
DaveB

DaveB

    Hall of Fame

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,053 posts
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Location:Redlands, CA
  • United States

Side note:
George Stewart also wrote a science fiction novel called "Earth Abides" (or "The Earth Abides") about a post-apocalyptic western U.S. I read that book years ago before I came across one of his place name books and realized he was the same author.
Dave Barnes
Esri
Product Engineer
Map Geek

#7
Kartograph

Kartograph

    Legendary Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 320 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Berlin, Deutschland
  • Germany

In Germany a lot of research was done into toponyms, because most of the time the names are older than the oldest written records. So through linguistics and very thorough research they found out which part was settled when and by whom.
As I said the power of a name is awesome compared to the brittle material stuff humans tend to regard as "solid".
Just like names they give you in highschool tend to stick around far longer than they ought to...

#8
Hans van der Maarel

Hans van der Maarel

    CartoTalk Editor-in-Chief

  • Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,868 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:The Netherlands
  • Interests:Cartography, GIS, history, popular science, music.
  • Netherlands

I read something recently (could have been linked to from here actually) about a Spanish explorer who travelled the North American west coast around the same time as Vancouver. The reason their toponyms didn't make it was because the Spanish didn't publish the maps that were made, but kept them in a safe.
Hans van der Maarel - Cartotalk Editor
Red Geographics
Email: hans@redgeographics.com / Twitter: @redgeographics

#9
Martin Gamache

Martin Gamache

    Ultimate Contributor

  • Associate Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 980 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Washington DC
  • Interests:History of Topographic Cartography
    Topographic Mapping
    History of Relief Depiction
    Thematic Cartography
    Demographic Cartography
    Cartographic techniques, methods, and tools
    Orienteering
    Panoramic & Kite Photography
  • United States

I read something recently (could have been linked to from here actually) about a Spanish explorer who travelled the North American west coast around the same time as Vancouver. The reason their toponyms didn't make it was because the Spanish didn't publish the maps that were made, but kept them in a safe.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


It might of been on the BBC, I heard or read the same thing. It was about access to spatial data. Illustrating that by locking up their maps the spaniards who had the better maps still lost out to the brits who had theirs translated and widely distributed.

#10
Kartograph

Kartograph

    Legendary Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 320 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Berlin, Deutschland
  • Germany

The British finally had their Capitol the centre of the Latidudinal Universe by virtue of publishing their maps (and a good clock) :P

#11
EcoGraphic

EcoGraphic

    Master Contributor

  • Links Moderator
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 241 posts
  • Location:Okanagan Valley, BC
  • Interests:landscape architecture,cartography,information architecture,wayfinding,landscape archaeology,cultural landscapes,sustainable design,visual journalism,travel writing,photography,illustration,languages
  • Canada

It might of been on the BBC, I heard  or read the same thing. It was about access to spatial data. Illustrating that by locking up their maps the spaniards who had the better maps still lost out to the brits who had theirs translated and widely distributed.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


Didn't they tell that story at the NACIS Conference?

G
Gillian Auld
EcoGraphic Design
www.EcoGraphic.ca

Design is the intermediary between information and understanding
Richard Grefe

#12
Hans van der Maarel

Hans van der Maarel

    CartoTalk Editor-in-Chief

  • Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,868 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:The Netherlands
  • Interests:Cartography, GIS, history, popular science, music.
  • Netherlands

Gillian,

Could be. I remember reading it *somewhere*, not that long ago. It's quite possible this was around the time, or slightly prior to, NACIS and that other people picked it up as well.
Hans van der Maarel - Cartotalk Editor
Red Geographics
Email: hans@redgeographics.com / Twitter: @redgeographics

#13
Martin Gamache

Martin Gamache

    Ultimate Contributor

  • Associate Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 980 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Washington DC
  • Interests:History of Topographic Cartography
    Topographic Mapping
    History of Relief Depiction
    Thematic Cartography
    Demographic Cartography
    Cartographic techniques, methods, and tools
    Orienteering
    Panoramic &amp; Kite Photography
  • United States

Might it of been in David Rumsey's presentation?

#14
EcoGraphic

EcoGraphic

    Master Contributor

  • Links Moderator
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 241 posts
  • Location:Okanagan Valley, BC
  • Interests:landscape architecture,cartography,information architecture,wayfinding,landscape archaeology,cultural landscapes,sustainable design,visual journalism,travel writing,photography,illustration,languages
  • Canada

Might it of been in David Rumsey's presentation?

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


Yah, I think so.........

G
Gillian Auld
EcoGraphic Design
www.EcoGraphic.ca

Design is the intermediary between information and understanding
Richard Grefe

#15
Martin Gamache

Martin Gamache

    Ultimate Contributor

  • Associate Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 980 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Washington DC
  • Interests:History of Topographic Cartography
    Topographic Mapping
    History of Relief Depiction
    Thematic Cartography
    Demographic Cartography
    Cartographic techniques, methods, and tools
    Orienteering
    Panoramic &amp; Kite Photography
  • United States

On a related note this very expensive atlas was recently published.


Atlas of North American english Language




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

-->