Jump to content

 
Photo

Map of Camden, Maine

- - - - -

  • Please log in to reply
10 replies to this topic

#1
Woody Emanuel

Woody Emanuel

    Newbie

  • Validated Member
  • Pip
  • 4 posts
  • United States

I am a retail clothing store owner in the coastal town of Camden, Maine (pop. 5,500), a popular summer tourism destination. I am a lover of maps but not a professional map designer in any way.

One of the issues we always have as merchants is directing visitors to our town to other specific locations within town for any number of reasons. Often, it is to other specific stores that sell a specific product the visitor is looking for. Or a specific restaurant with the best lobster, or where the schooners are. Most of the time it is a matter of explanation and pointing, giving specific directions to try to help that person. But it is time consuming and often employees don't know where something is.

Last year I decided to tackle the issue to make it easier for me and my employees to quickly point anyone in the right direction with a single page map that could include every retail store, restaurant, and points of interest in downtown Camden. I adopted a transit map format to accomplish it and it is easy to change as businesses come and go. Like a transit map, it's not to scale but shows relative locations pretty well

With it, we can quickly and easily circle where I'm located and where I'm sending visitors and they can walk out the door with the map and easily find their way around.

I used SmartDraw version 2008 and now 2009 which I find very suitable and easy to use for this purpose. It is a continuing work in progress.

Attached File  New_Camden_2009.pdf   668.34KB   636 downloads

#2
Hans van der Maarel

Hans van der Maarel

    CartoTalk Editor-in-Chief

  • Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,884 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:The Netherlands
  • Interests:Cartography, GIS, history, popular science, music.
  • Netherlands

This is a very interesting looking map. I like the novel idea (at least I've hardly ever seen a similar concept) of doing it transit-map style.

Maybe a legend would be useful. I figured out that the names in red are restaurants (they are, aren't they?) but a bit of explanation wouldn't hurt. Also, if you put the street names inside the streets, rather than in boxes alongside them, you gain a bit more space. This would allow you to, for example, use a slightly bigger text size to improve legibility.

I'm really curious, what kind of responses do you get from people that you hand these maps out to? Do they find them useful or do they prefer more traditional maps?
Hans van der Maarel - Cartotalk Editor
Red Geographics
Email: hans@redgeographics.com / Twitter: @redgeographics

#3
Woody Emanuel

Woody Emanuel

    Newbie

  • Validated Member
  • Pip
  • 4 posts
  • United States

This is a very interesting looking map. I like the novel idea (at least I've hardly ever seen a similar concept) of doing it transit-map style.

Maybe a legend would be useful. I figured out that the names in red are restaurants (they are, aren't they?) but a bit of explanation wouldn't hurt. Also, if you put the street names inside the streets, rather than in boxes alongside them, you gain a bit more space. This would allow you to, for example, use a slightly bigger text size to improve legibility.

I'm really curious, what kind of responses do you get from people that you hand these maps out to? Do they find them useful or do they prefer more traditional maps?


Thank you for your comments and suggestions, Hans. I think a legend is necessary and I am looking for ways to "clean it up." I am concerned about legibility and the small text.

I have had very good response so far. Our business group has put together a tri-fold brochure called "Camden At A Glance" with the map in the inside, and written information about Camden on the outside. Our Chamber of Commerce is handing them out and using them in a packet of information to give to cruise ship passengers. Also, I have been asked by the next town near us, Rockland, to do one for them to use and pass out.

Again, it serves a specific purpose and I do not see it as a replacement or substitute for more traditional maps. In fact we have other Camden maps, including this historical walking-tour map of Camden developed last year that accurately depicts the historic buildings, describes their history, and gives a suggested walking tour of the town:

Camden Walking Map

Thanks again.

#4
jrat

jrat

    Master Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 143 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Hagerstown, MD
  • United States

I agree with the need for a legend and I didn't notice the street names untill I read the other posts. It reminds me of maps in Malls of store locations.

#5
MapMedia

MapMedia

    Hall of Fame

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,029 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Davis, California
  • United States

Very cool - Its clean and is very attractive - As Hans said, novel, which gets attention. Though never having been to Camden it is not something that would tell me much about the city, or attract me, personally - looks like a mall map.

#6
Matthew Hampton

Matthew Hampton

    Hall of Fame

  • Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,314 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Portland, Oregon
  • Interests:Playing in the mountains and rivers.
  • United States

I rather like your map Woody. A couple of niggly things. The different colored streets throw me a bit, but perhaps you use colored cement for different streets? :lol: I think line thickness is enough to indicate arterial, collector, etc.

Looking a little more closely it's hard to figure out what the grey lines are for. Initially I thought sidewalks, but that doesn't necessarily work on the minor streets. Perhaps they're bus routes? I would turn them all one color and perhaps remove the grey sidewalkish lines - leaving the points to show which side of the street the stores are on.

I like the angular feeling of the map - it makes things feel straightforward and direct.

co-cartographic creator of boringmaps.com


#7
frax

frax

    Hall of Fame

  • Associate Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,310 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Stockholm, Sweden
  • Interests:music, hiking, friends, nature, photography, traveling. and maps!
  • Sweden

Interesting!

This might be good to direct people from a to b, but too me it feels a bit stiff for just general browsing or to get an overview over things.

Also - now I am not familiar with Camden, but I have a feeling that it is a charming seaside place with vacationers - right? Maybe a map should communicate that too, and invite for strolling and browsing through town and capture/communicate some of that charm - now it feels a bit stiff and overly generalized, I would say - and maybe a map should capture landmarks as well.
Hugo Ahlenius
Nordpil - custom maps and GIS
http://nordpil.com/
Twitter

#8
Jean-Louis

Jean-Louis

    Ultimate Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 545 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Montreal Quebec
  • Interests:In the vast ocean of my ignorance, I have a few bubbles of interests
  • Canada

I think this concept is fantastic. I especially like the way stores are identified and laid out.
With the types of maps I do, I always emphasize environment, look and feeling at the cost of accuracy so I find your treatment a very good complement and an excellent solution for clarity.
Thanks for posting
Jean-Louis Rheault
Montreal


#9
DaveB

DaveB

    Hall of Fame

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,054 posts
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Location:Redlands, CA
  • United States

The transit map style is an interesting approach. I like it. It looks fairly clean and useful for directing people to specific stores and restaurants.

The walking tour map is cool, too. Another interesting approach showing the buildings as they would appear from the street.

You talked about how some groups responded to the maps, like the chamber of commerce and a nearby town, but I'm curious about the response of map-users such as tourists actually using the maps to get somewhere. Do they seem to find the transit style easier for navigating, for example?

Nice to have a variety of maps to choose from depending on interests and needs. :)
Dave Barnes
Esri
Product Engineer
Map Geek

#10
Woody Emanuel

Woody Emanuel

    Newbie

  • Validated Member
  • Pip
  • 4 posts
  • United States

Thank you all for your comments and critiques. I very much appreciate it and helps me see the forest for the trees. Let me address your questions:

- Different colored streets. I did that intentionally thinking it would be visually better. I'll reassess that.

- Gray lines. At first, I put dots on the roads but it looked cluttered. I moved them away then added the gray lines, thinking of them as sidewalks.

- User reaction. The reaction I have had directly is varied. Since I am explaining to them what the map represents ("Here's Bay View St., here we are, here's where you want to go") I haven't gotten an initial reaction of "What is this? What am I looking at?" Some have said they like the idea, one asked if Camden had a subway system, but most said little. Most of the reaction I am getting is from other businesses and the Chambers of Commerces since it makes it easier and faster to help visitors get from point A to point B. We should do a more formal survey to ascertain reactions to the map without saying anything about it beforehand.

Again, thanks to you all.

#11
Araner

Araner

    Newbie

  • New Member
  • Pip
  • 1 posts
  • United States

Thank you all for your comments and critiques. I very much appreciate it and helps me see the forest for the trees. Let me address your questions:

- Different colored streets. I did that intentionally thinking it would be visually better. I'll reassess that.

- Gray lines. At first, I put dots on the roads but it looked cluttered. I moved them away then added the gray lines, thinking of them as sidewalks.

- User reaction. The reaction I have had directly is varied. Since I am explaining to them what the map represents ("Here's Bay View St., here we are, here's where you want to go") I haven't gotten an initial reaction of "What is this? What am I looking at?" Some have said they like the idea, one asked if Camden had a subway system, but most said little. Most of the reaction I am getting is from other businesses and the Chambers of Commerces since it makes it easier and faster to help visitors get from point A to point B. We should do a more formal survey to ascertain reactions to the map without saying anything about it beforehand.

Again, thanks to you all.


Great map! I actually tried doing something similar for the Maine state rail system about a year ago, but I could only use photoshop and it came out terrible! Then, sure enough I was screening a film at the Camden International Film Festival this year and I come across your map! My wife was on the floor laughing, because she couldn't believe there was anybody else in the world as nerdy as me! Maybe i'm not such a nerd after all!
I live in the Brunswick area and I've been exploring ways to get around Maine without a car. Creative transit mapping is exactly the kind of thing that I had in mind. If people start thinking of commuter vans, local transit buses, Concord Trailways, the Maine Eastern Railroad and the Downeaster as part of an interconnected network like the NYC MTA then maybe we can chip away at the empire of the auto...

I just started a new site called "Car Free Maine" at www.carfreemaine.tumblr.com hopefully there's more to come.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

-->