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New York State/Seneca County/Army Depot Maps

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#1
Michael Karpovage

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Hello,

These two maps appear in my newly released mystery thriller novel Crown of Serpents. As the story is based in the Finger Lakes region of central New York State - mostly in the Seneca County area around the old Seneca Army Depot - I wanted to create maps for the purpose of helping readers get a sense of location from the story scenes. It's what I personal always have liked in novels and so I wanted to offer the same in my book too. Both maps are black and white and rendered in Photoshop. The combo State/County map is 2D while the Seneca Army Depot map is a 3D (I drew it as a 2D then simply skewed it in Photoshop to get that 3D 'feel'). I wanted to keep the maps clean and only communicate essential detail relevant to the novel. The Seneca Army Depot map has building footprints because several scenes take place in and around the base - and well, underneath the base too in the secret caverns of the Iroquois Indians! Hint.

Anyway, I invite you to check out the maps and offer feedback that maybe I can improve upon for my next novel edition as I reach unheard of levels of book sales similar to Dan Brown's DaVinci Code! - or so is my dream! ;-) And please do visit my book website too at www.crownofserpents.com as I show off other illustrations in the book and some of my design skills - such as designing the cover art myself along with the entire website graphics (via a template in Wordpress).

The two maps:

Attached File  NYS_and_Seneca_Maps.jpg   461.17KB   156 downloads

Attached File  Seneca_Depot_Map_3D.jpg   450.78KB   149 downloads

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Michael Karpovage

• Savannah Historic District Illustrated Map
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Mapformation, LLC - Atlanta, GA office
www.mapformation.com

• Author of Map of Thieves
www.mapofthieves.com


#2
Gretchen Peterson

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I like these! The dark background of NY with the white city labels is a refreshing deviation from normal (i.e., white with black outline for the state and black labels.)

I checked out your book on Amazon and it looks like it'll be a good read. Your sales rank is quite good as well - good job!

How long did it take you to write?

#3
Michael Karpovage

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Thanks for that feedback on the maps Gretchen!

Book took 4 years to research/write between a full time and part time job! Perseverance is a good word to describe the effort.

M

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Michael Karpovage

• Savannah Historic District Illustrated Map
www.karpovagecreative.com/savannah

• Account Manager/Illustrator
Mapformation, LLC - Atlanta, GA office
www.mapformation.com

• Author of Map of Thieves
www.mapofthieves.com


#4
DaveB

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Very nice maps! The 3D effect seems to work well.

Congratulations on getting published! :)
Dave Barnes
Esri
Product Engineer
Map Geek

#5
Michael Karpovage

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Very nice maps! The 3D effect seems to work well.

Congratulations on getting published! :)


Thanks David! On the Depot map I wanted to of course render every building on the base in 3D, including all 519 ammunition storage igloo bunkers, but sometimes I bite off more than I can chew! Regardless, it works for the book readers. And I also did a little trade with the Seneca White Deer, Inc. organization where they use this same Depot map on their website in return for giving me a link to my book (since my book involves the white deer herd that had been corralled in the Depot since 1941). Go to: http://senecawhitedeer.org/home.php
So, it all works out well.

Michael

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Michael Karpovage

• Savannah Historic District Illustrated Map
www.karpovagecreative.com/savannah

• Account Manager/Illustrator
Mapformation, LLC - Atlanta, GA office
www.mapformation.com

• Author of Map of Thieves
www.mapofthieves.com


#6
ceicher

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Hello Michael,

Your post brought back for me fond upstate New York childhood memories. A great aunt had a cottage on the west side of Seneca Lake, more or less just across from the Army depot. I recall the strangeness of a military research barge in the center of one of a Finger Lake, conducting submarine research or...well, I'm not sure what they were doing. However, I do know that one would hear a strange ping... ping... ping when you stuck your head underwater while swimming.

In terms of feedback... well, I once wrote Neal Stephenson asking him why he chose not to include a scale on any of his maps of 17th Century London (included in one of The Baroque Cycle novels). He's a fellow geographer, but sadly, he never wrote back...

I'd ask you too though, why no scale? Readers might be curious how long or wide for example, Seneca Lake is. Maybe your text is descriptive enough ; )

Good luck

-Cory

#7
Hans van der Maarel

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Maps look great, Michael! I always enjoy going back and forth between a story and the accompanying map. One little comment though, I assume "NYS Police Barracks" on the overview map is the same feature as "Trooper Station" on the detail map, but it is slightly confusing.

Other than that, I like your style!

In terms of feedback... well, I once wrote Neal Stephenson asking him why he chose not to include a scale on any of his maps of 17th Century London (included in one of The Baroque Cycle novels). He's a fellow geographer, but sadly, he never wrote back...


Maybe Nick can answer that question, iirc he did most or all of the maps for that series of books :P
Hans van der Maarel - Cartotalk Editor
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#8
Michael Karpovage

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Ceicher, to be honest a scale never crossed my mind to add to the maps, oops! On the other hand, the text in the book is very descriptive about the length of Seneca Lake and it's depth. I do that in the dialogue. Seneca Lake still does have that Navy research barge in the middle of the lake off the west coast town of Dresden as it is 600 feet deep in that area. They do sonar research so that pinging must have been that! If you get too close to the barge in your own boat I was told armed guards come out and politely shoo you away! Go to: http://www.npt.nuwc....neca/index.html
Have you ever heard of the "Lake Guns?" Loud thunderous booms like artillery. Indians had their legends for them. But modern day scientists believe they are huge natural gas bubbles rising from the depths of Seneca Lake and once hitting the surface creating that booming sound. Lots of residents around the lake have heard them.

Hans, yes, those two labels are actually one in the same. My consistency was lacking! LOL! Heck, I was trying to weave together a tale of murder, Masons, and Revolutionary War treasure in the present day all revolving around a defunct U.S. Army base and a sacred whit deer herd! By the way, (shameless self-promotion ahead) my readers are saying they cannot put the book down, so please do take a look at the book site if you're interested.

What was really cool in my book research was superimposing a modern day topographical contour map of Seneca County on top of an old 1850 map and seeing how those old farms, churches, cemeteries, and distinct terrain features lined up to the present day. I also relied on actual descriptions of the Continental Army soldiers' journals from 1779 as to where a particular Indian village was located inland from the shore of Seneca Lake, the destroyed village of Kendaia. I did this map detective work in Photoshop and used transparency of course and had to adjust scaling, but I tell ya, it was incredible fun! Almost like trying to find a treasure in the modern day and only an old map to go by. Was really cool. I had one of the characters in the book do this when she was trying to find a secret Indian cave entrance based on a series of clues related to a brook, a spring, cornfield, apple orchard, and duration of walk from that Indian village location - sort of reliving the experience I had when actually hiking through that same area.

Michael

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Michael Karpovage

• Savannah Historic District Illustrated Map
www.karpovagecreative.com/savannah

• Account Manager/Illustrator
Mapformation, LLC - Atlanta, GA office
www.mapformation.com

• Author of Map of Thieves
www.mapofthieves.com





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