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#1
François Goulet

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Hi!

It's been a while since I posted anything here!

It the first draft of a map of the Old Quebec City around 1940 for an historical novel.

The editor don't want anything fancy or with a 1940's style. I had a list of place and street and they're the only thing mentioned on the map.

I'll still have some building footprints to add but I'm waiting for the editor's and the author's comments before adding anything since they will surely add and remove a lot of things.

I don't work often only in black and white. I'll probably add a mask around my label for the building and street contours (so Chateau Frontenac will be more readable), but I think the look is about right for me...

Comments? :)

Thanks!!

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#2
haris179

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Hi!

It's been a while since I posted anything here!

It the first draft of a map of the Old Quebec City around 1940 for an historical novel.

The editor don't want anything fancy or with a 1940's style. I had a list of place and street and they're the only thing mentioned on the map.

I'll still have some building footprints to add but I'm waiting for the editor's and the author's comments before adding anything since they will surely add and remove a lot of things.

I don't work often only in black and white. I'll probably add a mask around my label for the building and street contours (so Chateau Frontenac will be more readable), but I think the look is about right for me...

Comments? :)

Thanks!!


pretty good work bro!
what application do you use? i use ArcGIS and ERDAS.

#3
MapMedia

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I like it a lot - Maybe you can label the Terrasse again on the west side. and the north arrow - instead of black with white glow (kind of spooky), make it white on black?
Since the Terrasse boundary is black, possibly make the water 90% black so you draw the focus more to the city center?

Very nice and clean!

#4
DMoore

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I like it a lot - Maybe you can label the Terrasse again on the west side. and the north arrow - instead of black with white glow (kind of spooky), make it white on black?
Since the Terrasse boundary is black, possibly make the water 90% black so you draw the focus more to the city center?

Very nice and clean!


I agree with MapMedia's notes.

Great job on the map. I'd consider making the Terasse label stronger as well since it's a bit hard to see. Perhaps it's just my monitor.
Dorn Moore, GISP
Green Space GIS

#5
François Goulet

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Thanks guys!

I used ArcGIS to georeferenced my reference maps so I could export them rectify and at the right scale and MAPublisher with Illy CS2 for the map itself.

I'll find another way to label the Terrasse because the thick black line is in fact the old ramparts of the city and we can now walk on top of the part near the Citadelle. I've know the Terrasse Dufferin since I'm a kid so I didn't even thought of that! I'll label the ramparts too...

Thanks a lot! :)

#6
razornole

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Hello,

I love black and white maps, brings everything down to the basic elements. My concern is mainly with actually using the color black. I would reserve it for the text only, and even then I usually use ~85-90%. To me the figure/ground is blown with a black river. Your figure is so light that you could easily get away with ~35-45% gray. I would say the same for the wall, unless it plays a real prominent role in the novel/book even if it does it could still be a lot less harsh. At a quick glance I noticed the title-north arrow-river-wall in that order.

Since the author mentioned what streets he/she wanted, I would make the font sizes equal. I.e. make the two Cote(s) larger or the rest of the labels smaller. Same thing with Parc Montmorency. To me it gives the impression that those elements are forced and not strategized. Furthermore, I would make the parks the same color, I don't know where Parc des Champ starts or ends, but I do with Parc Montmorency since it is a darker gray.

Hope this helps,
kru
"Ah, to see the world with the eyes of the gods is geography--to know cities and tribes, mountains and rivers, earth and sea, this is our gift."
Strabo 22AD

#7
DaveB

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Very nice!
I agree about making the north arrow white (like the scale bar). I would also move it down to the water area where the scale bar sits.
I didn't have any problem with the black water and I saw the black "Terasse" as some sort of old city walls (more from the shape). Although I could see where the figure/ground could get mixed up. Black is a strong color.
I missed the Terasse label until someone mentioned it and I went back and looked again.
Dave Barnes
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#8
Jean-Louis

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C'est tres bien François,
I would concur about the black. or at least not make both the river and the walls black
Jean-Louis Rheault
Montreal


#9
Dennis McClendon

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To me the streets look way too thick.

And please tell me you're not mixing Baskerville with Palatino!

One thing to remember in maps for books is the press gain. Make all your black tints about 5-8 percent less than you want them to appear when printed.
Dennis McClendon, Chicago CartoGraphics
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#10
François Goulet

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To me the streets look way too thick.

And please tell me you're not mixing Baskerville with Palatino!

One thing to remember in maps for books is the press gain. Make all your black tints about 5-8 percent less than you want them to appear when printed.



Almost... It's Baskerville and Book Antiqua...

I didn't have that much choice with the fonts... I had to stay within "standard" Windows fonts, something everybody has... The client didn't want an historical look map, but I, at least, want to give it a older look, hence the "old" serif font.

I'd have like to be able to "shop" a little to find a more "original" font... but I'm always open for suggestions...

#11
MapMedia

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I had to stay within "standard" Windows fonts, something everybody has...


I never heard of this limitation. If it is a PDF map, I could see this problem, but an easy fix would be to convert type to outlines, no?

#12
François Goulet

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I had to stay within "standard" Windows fonts, something everybody has...


I never heard of this limitation. If it is a PDF map, I could see this problem, but an easy fix would be to convert type to outlines, no?


I've work for them for 2½ years before they cut my job and we had some font problems, mostly, it seem, because they all work on Mac and I had a PC and they fonts weren't opentype. They bought me the font I needed for my projects, but since then, for every project I now do as a freelance, I have to use standard opentype font like the one installed with MS Office in case they want to correct a typo or change the size of the text.

The map is sent in PDF and .ai format, but I can't, unfortunately, outline the text...

#13
Dennis McClendon

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You could, however, choose one serif face and stick to it. My astonishment was not at the technical feat, it was at the aesthetic undesirability of mixing serif faces from different centuries.
Dennis McClendon, Chicago CartoGraphics
chicagocarto.com

#14
François Goulet

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You could, however, choose one serif face and stick to it. My astonishment was not at the technical feat, it was at the aesthetic undesirability of mixing serif faces from different centuries.


For that, you're right... I had the same comment for someone else I asked to check my map...

Thanks!

#15
Justin Procopio

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Nice map, I agree with most of the other comments. My two cents--if you have the ability, I would cut some of the line work where your labels are ontop of other features, ex: Palace d'Armes... clip the line behind the ac and the A.

---------------------------------
Justin Procopio




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