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#1
Nick H

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Well, after commenting on other peoples' maps it's time to give them a chance to get their own back :) . This is a simplified geological map showing four ammonite zones in the famous Blue Lias of the English west country. The map is intended to help anyone interested in palaeontology or geology at any level find the exposures on the ground. Do you think it is fit for purpose? I know the map has some quite serious problems, but I'd be grateful for your comments.

Attached File  kilve_geo.pdf   631.63KB   343 downloads

Added later. The map seems to register on Google Earth with fair precision, see:

http://confound.me.u...s/kilve_geo.kmz

Regards, N.

Edited by Nick H, 17 May 2009 - 09:27 AM.
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Caversham, Reading, England.

#2
wolfegeo

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Nick,

The title and legend throw me off a little. I think you’re trying to show me where, within the intertidal zone, different types of ammonites have been discovered. The map doesn’t seem to be about the geology of the region but rather the ammonite fossils which have been found in this part of the Blue Lias formation.

In the grouping next to Triassic you list geologic formations. However, in the Jurassic grouping you list various types of ammonites. The inconsistency throws me off.

I’d suggest changing the title to something like “Ammonite Zones Identified in the Intertidal Region of the Blue Lias Formation, Kilve, Somerset”.

Thanks for sharing some of your work.

#3
razornole

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Hello Nick,

Love seeing maps on physical science.

To me the curved text led me to believe that this was some type of perspective map, the fact that there wasn't a north arrow didn't help the cause. I don't use north arrows when I keep my text orthogonal, but here you don't use either. Waterbodies are italicized.

The colors seem random and arbitrary, looks like generic GIS colors to me. Use shade of a one color for the Jurassic strata and shade of another for the Triassic. There would be much more cohesion that way. On your legend you use gray for beach deposits, but I don't see that color on your basemap. I wouldn't use blue for a color for anything except the ocean, sea, channel, or any waterbody. The fact that the water, land, and beach deposits are white is confusing.

Over all the map is heavy weighted on the right side, there needs to be some balance.

I would use a baseline grid for the 3 columns of text on the bottom. Drives me crazy to see staggered sentences right next to each other.

Hope this helps,
kru
"Ah, to see the world with the eyes of the gods is geography--to know cities and tribes, mountains and rivers, earth and sea, this is our gift."
Strabo 22AD

#4
aug_aug

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Maybe some underlying topography to show what the landforms are like, such as shaded relief (dem), or contours.

Nice map though, I have a few ammonites myself collected from outside of Mitchell, Oregon. Good luck.

Attached File  geology.jpg   762.37KB   88 downloads

#5
Nick H

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Thanks for the comments, they are gratefully received and I'm redoing the map to try and incorporate the suggested improvements.

Finding the right colours is a nightmare, I think pastels are to be preferred to primaries but I'm struggling to find six that fit the bill. RGB codes anyone? Personally, I like curved text where it seems appropriate, but I expect that this is because I'm old :) . I'd love to use some underlying topography, but the (free) elevation data (SRTM) available for England is just too coarse.

Regards, N.
Caversham, Reading, England.

#6
aug_aug

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Have you looked at color brewer , or try googling "web color palette" or "color palette selector/chooser" etc. I seem to recall a lot of those, I know Pantone is a print company that should have available pre-defined palettes with rgb values, you could try them.

#7
Charles Syrett

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You may want to look into the possibility that there may be "standard" colours already for these formations. I did geological maps for several years in the 70s for the Ontario government, and there were colour standards that had been in place for decades. Things like: granites are always pinks, metasediments were greys, metavolcanics were greens, etc. Paleozoics also had their own colour specs. Oh -- and water was always white! I've seen this on geological maps produced in other places as well. The idea, presumably, is to "free up" as many colours as possible for use on the geological formations. If you choose to keep your water white, you may want to fill the land with some sort of nondescript grey tint and identify it as "unclassified".

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#8
David Medeiros

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Color Brewer as mentioned, also look into Adobe's Kuler color system. Great tool for playing with color though it only does 5 in a group.

http://kuler.adobe.com/

I would definitely color the land fill and maybe the water. Color choice wise I would move the deposits into more muted or pastel colors, light gray on the land and light blue on the water (being careful to keep contrast between the blue geology high or avoiding blue for the geology altogether).

Since you have a 1000m grid showing you might want to line your scale up with the grid. You could drop the tic below the zero mark to keep it on center. And you could drop every other label to reduce the clutter a little. (at this point there may be more text in your scale than on the map itself).

The line for the high water mark looks like an extension of the trail from the parking lot. Try a finer pattern or even a thick solid screened line to emphasize the tidal break. As it is now the outer edge of the colored geology looks like the above tide shore line.

I would like to see the channel label pushed to the left a bit since there is more Chanel on that side of the map. I'd up the pt size 2 or 3 points, use upper lowers and increase the traking to spread the label out a bit.

Not sure how the UK does this but in the US there is usually a set label that goes along with the depoist name (like Qhbd for beach deposits). See if any apply to your map and include them along with the color in both in the legend and the map. Speaking of Beach Deposits, your legend show them as gray due to the legend background.

dave


edited to add: I would also look at stringing the High Water Mark label out a bit. Labels of that sort along a long line can be pulled apart to cover more of the line. Also cartographic convention would be to place the label above the line though I understand that you may want to keep it on the land side of the map in this case.

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#9
Nick H

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Herewith, Version 2 of the Kilve geological map. I've tried to incorporate as many of your suggestions as I can, but I do want to try and keep the map as simple as possible, it's the geology which is the story here. Many thanks to all of those who of their kindness took the time to comment, I know I haven't acted on some of the suggestions, but that knowledge is now in my head for the future.

Regards, N.

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Caversham, Reading, England.

#10
kent

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much better,

I like the idea of extending the text of the high water mark.

I don't know why there is a period after 'Sea Lane'?.

The land and ocean should be different colors, or fill patterns or something.

The scale has a lot of detail. I like the earlier suggestion of lining it up with the easting grid. There also doesn't need to be so many ticks and numbers.

As a final note, the footpath looks more prominent than the road (though this is likely just my personal bias).

#11
Tommo

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Too add my ten cents worth...!

I agree with all that the beach deposits and water need to be coloured. The US convention of waterways in white has always been slightly confusing for me, and in my experience only occurs on maps with small water areas and majority coloured areas.

Beach deposits could be in a pale yellow colour to reduce their confusion and also their emphasis (in fitting with global geological colour convention - yellow indicating Quaternary deposits)

The polygon borders are my personal issue - do these represent contacts between rock types? Or zones or different ammonites found? IMHO, I'd reduce their intensity slightly as they take my focus immediately.

Rather then colour the land as been suggested - can you extend teh inland geology to the borders, then add a transparency mask so only the study area is highlighted?

Finally the scale - definiately less detail. How about showing the 100, 200, 500, 1000 divisions?

Overall, nice work! Geological maps are complicated beasts I find, as everybody looks for different information out of them. Also, thank you for submitting the work for review. Not too much geology comes through here, so always nice to see what others are generating.

Tom

#12
Nick H

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Once again, thanks for the comments and suggestions, expect a Version 3 in a couple of days. There are a couple of unsnapped polygons that need to be sorted out as well.

Regards, N.
Caversham, Reading, England.

#13
razornole

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The colors are much improved. I like the base-line grid with the text, makes everything much more clean and tidy. Now I would just try to figure out how to remove the orphan word "moon" in the second paragraph. Maybe if you say something like "a couple to several days after a new moon..." that will force "full" to fourth line to get rid of the orphan.

Maybe center the space between Bristol Channel with your grid. That will look better, and also help in balancing your map.

I still believe that the island effect needs to be eliminated.

kru
"Ah, to see the world with the eyes of the gods is geography--to know cities and tribes, mountains and rivers, earth and sea, this is our gift."
Strabo 22AD




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