Jump to content

 
Photo

Four Corners


  • Please log in to reply
1 reply to this topic

#1
Rob

Rob

    Legendary Contributor

  • Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 418 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Kailua, Hawaii
  • Interests:anything outside.
  • United States

Having made my own survey errors before, i just have to chuckle...

Four Corners spot is 2.5 miles off
By The Associated Press
Posted: 04/20/2009 12:07:41 PM MDT
Updated: 04/20/2009 02:59:41 PM MDT

SALT LAKE CITY — Tourists who want to put a hand or foot in each of four states at the Four Corners area are apparently off the mark — by more than a couple miles.

According to readings by the National Geodetic Survey, the Four Corners marker showing the intersection of Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico and Utah is about 2.5 miles west of where it should be.

The only place in the United States where four state boundaries come together was first surveyed by the U.S. government in 1868 during the initial survey of Colorado's southern boundary line.

The intended location was 109 degrees west longitude and 37 degrees north latitude. But, because of surveying errors, the popular tourist spot is actually just a bit off.

The accurate location would be downhill to the east of U.S. 160 in Colorado and northeast of the San Juan River as it flows into New Mexico.

"That's a long ways to be off," said David Bronson, surveyor of San Juan County, Utah. Still, he said the monument's present location is the accepted one.

Bronson said that given the crude equipment of the era, it's amazing surveyors were as accurate as they were around the time the marker was established.

#2
Dale Sanderson

Dale Sanderson

    Master Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 136 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Headwaters Hill, CO
  • United States

[quote name='Rob' date='Apr 20 2009, 07:23 PM' post='23788']
The intended location was 109 degrees west longitude and 37 degrees north latitude. But, because of surveying errors, the popular tourist spot is actually just a bit off.

I'm surprised this is news. For one thing, just about every monument could be more accurately surveyed if we were to do it today. But more importantly, the info in the article is incorrect. The monument was based on the Washington Meridian, not the Greenwich Meridian. The corner was intended to be located at 32 degrees west of Washington (which is a couple miles away from 109 degrees west of Greenwich). See this.
Dale Sanderson
professionally: cartographics manager for Dex One
personally: cartophile and road-geek (my website)




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

-->