Jump to content

 
Photo

Multivariate Graduated Symbols

- - - - -

  • Please log in to reply
10 replies to this topic

#1
Mike Boruta

Mike Boruta

    Key Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 99 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Ouray, Colorado
  • United States

I have a dataset of over 4000 points and I want to encode two different values via graduated symbols. I want to use size to indicate one variable and color to indicate another. Is there a way to do this in Arc? I think what I'm looking for is something like this:

Multivariate Renderer

...but I have no idea how to "compile" it.

Right now, the only option I can think of is to export my points as two different layers, one symbolized by graduated symbols, the other as colors - and then manually change the colors of the graduated symbols in Illy to match the correct color variable. But for 4000+ points this would be a bit time consuming.

Any ideas?

#2
ELeFevre

ELeFevre

    Hall of Fame

  • Associate Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,049 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Louisville, Colorado USA
  • Interests:Cartography, musical instruments, reading, hiking, craft beer
  • United States

Hi,
You can do this in ArcMap using the "Multiple Attributes" option under the symbology tab.

1) Select your first field/column under the "Value fields" (oranges, apples, pears, et cetera). Add all of the values and symbolize by color.
2) Click on the "Symbol Size" button under the Color Ramp. Select your second column and symbolize the values by size (number of oranges, apples, pears, et cetera). Set your class ranges and don't bother changing the color of the points - because your symbolizing by color in step # 1.

Does this help?



#3
Mike Boruta

Mike Boruta

    Key Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 99 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Ouray, Colorado
  • United States

That does help and it does pretty much exactly what I need. I had tried using that before but I forgot to click on "add all values" and I couldn't figure out why it wouldn't work. Thanks Erin!

#4
ELeFevre

ELeFevre

    Hall of Fame

  • Associate Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,049 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Louisville, Colorado USA
  • Interests:Cartography, musical instruments, reading, hiking, craft beer
  • United States

Glad to help!



#5
slgrif

slgrif

    Newbie

  • New Member
  • Pip
  • 2 posts
  • No Country Selected

I've seen a lot of tutorials on the web for representing two variables, but how do you represent three or more? Is there a way, say, to change the color or shape of the symbol to represent a third variable?

Suzanne

#6
Matthew Hampton

Matthew Hampton

    Hall of Fame

  • Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,290 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Portland, Oregon
  • Interests:Playing in the mountains and rivers.
  • United States

It's certainly possible to create tri-variate symbols (color, size, shape). Here is a map from a mobility atlas that has tri-variate symbology. The size indicates the traffic volume, the color indicates the level on congestion and the shape indicates the direction. There is a 4th variable (time of day) that is not represented as a symbol, but is indicated in the title.

Attached File  Corr10_MV.jpg   93.98KB   73 downloads

Oregon Metro - Portland, OR
www.oregonmetro.gov


#7
frax

frax

    Hall of Fame

  • Associate Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,299 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Stockholm, Sweden
  • Interests:music, hiking, friends, nature, photography, traveling. and maps!
  • Sweden

Just a word of caution:
I think one should be extremely careful with adding too many variables and dimensions on a map! (especially when representing large area in thematic maps)

For Matt's example it might work (don't know the whole context) if there are lines and points maybe.

The readability of a map gets reduced exponentially when adding additional variables (very broadly speaking) - of course this depends on your audience and context!
Hugo Ahlenius
Nordpil - custom maps and GIS
http://nordpil.com/
Twitter

#8
Matthew Hampton

Matthew Hampton

    Hall of Fame

  • Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,290 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Portland, Oregon
  • Interests:Playing in the mountains and rivers.
  • United States

FWIW that map is one of nearly 400 that Heath and I made for an atlas and draft 1.0 is nearly finished. It's more of a technical piece for local planners in the Portland region that looks at mobility issues (motor vehicle, transit, freight, bike, ped, etc.) We split the region into 24 different transportation corridors and completed an 8-page spread for each one. It started as a simple 2-pager but has blossomed and I am guessing version 2.0 will include another page or so per corridor.

Here is the full page for more context. We exported all the maps from ArcMAP as PDF's and placed them InDesign. I've also attached the index map (of which I am most proud).

Attached File  MV_Corridor10.jpg   365.85KB   61 downloads
Attached File  IndexMap.jpg   155.32KB   53 downloads

Oregon Metro - Portland, OR
www.oregonmetro.gov


#9
MapMedia

MapMedia

    Hall of Fame

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,029 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Davis, California
  • United States

Matthew, I really like the symbol scheme you have for two reasons:
1. it is bi-polar, works with opposing directional data at a single point
2. is arrowlike, indicating direction of flow

Though why not use a single color, 4 shades, instead of 2 cool and 2 warm colors?

#10
DaveB

DaveB

    Hall of Fame

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,042 posts
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Location:Redlands, CA
  • United States

Bi-polar maps! :lol:

I like them (don't quite understand it all, but the intended audience probably does). The index map is a cool concept and well-executed.
Dave Barnes
Esri
Product Engineer
Map Geek

#11
heath b

heath b

    Key Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 71 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Portland, OR
  • Interests:the great outdoors, bouldering, martinis, unusual graphical representation
  • United States

Matthew, I really like the symbol scheme you have for two reasons:
1. it is bi-polar, works with opposing directional data at a single point
2. is arrowlike, indicating direction of flow

Though why not use a single color, 4 shades, instead of 2 cool and 2 warm colors?


I worked with Matthew on the Atlas. The symbol colors on this map correspond to a level of congestion on the roadways. It has been standard for us as planners to use this type of color scheme to highlight congested segments of road. Essentially, green means traffic flows well and red means that it is gridlocked. So the green-to-red color scheme takes on the good-to-bad theme.

We used the same symbology on a transit map as well to depict transit ridership. Good levels of ridership can be hotly contested. A bus full to capacity is not necessarily better than a bus that is half full because it can begin to discourage transit riders from using the line. At the same time, an empty bus is a financial problem. So for the color scheme on this map, we decided to use 4 shades of blue to show the level of ridership.

The corridor atlas has been such a fun project to work on. There is a lot of information that we depicted on 8 pages of maps and it was a challenge to provide this information without overwhelming the user. So far, feedback has been positive from the urban planners that have seen it.
Attached File  Transit_Corridor.jpg   144.39KB   45 downloads

Edited by Matthew Hampton, 12 May 2009 - 12:09 PM.
Matthew edited this post to add an inline Transit image from another corridor





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

-->