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#1
DanM

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I always get a chuckle when maps have a 'not to be used for navigation' disclaimer, especially when they're fairly large scale. Now that I'm making a map along these lines, I'm wondering if I should include such a warning or not.
My question is: Is the 'not for navigation' disclaimer used to denote that the map wasn't made to have exacting geometric accuracy for it's features and other map elements?

I wondered since sometimes a reference map is very accurate, especially in terms of relation of features and this is good enough for 'navigation' for me in some instances (trail goes between featureX, featureY, and then crosses the river--using these references can be used for navigation in my book). So is the term navigation used very specifically in this context, as in using geometric-based tools (compass, GPS, etc.) to allow one to navigate utilizing a 'navigation map'?

Thanks,
Dan M.

#2
razornole

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It is my guess that all those disclaimers one sees on the bottom of maps is to protect the cartographer legally. I.E. to keep one from getting sued. Say for example someone takes your map and uses for navigation and falls off a cliff and dies. This person's family could sue you because you did not have the cliff delineated on your navigation map. However, if you had the disclaimer on their that the map wasn't to be used for navigational purposes, then you would be safe/safer.

In our litigious society, I try to be as safe as possible. I always look at the disclaimers that other cartographers use and try to incorporate them into my maps. I'm not a lawyer and I don't know if this helps, but I haven't been sued yet.

kru
"Ah, to see the world with the eyes of the gods is geography--to know cities and tribes, mountains and rivers, earth and sea, this is our gift."
Strabo 22AD

#3
jrat

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I would agree that the disclaimer doen't reflect on the cartographic accuracy of the map. We use highly accurate data and still have a required disclaimer at the bottom of the map.

#4
Nick H

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My question is: Is the 'not for navigation' disclaimer used to denote that the map wasn't made to have exacting geometric accuracy for it's features and other map elements?


It looks like at an attempt at a general, catch-all, get-out clause to me. Could it possibly work? You can almost hear the lawyer: "Mr Cartographer, if this map isn't to be used for navigation then pray tell what exactly is its purpose?".

I've just had a look at the get-out clause in a road atlas for Virginia, which is a little stronger but still weak. "The information in this publication has been obtained from various authoritative sources. Nevertheless, a work of this scope may contain some inaccuracies. While we have attempted to verify the information contained in this publication, no liability is assumed for damages, direct or consequential, arising from error or omissions". This is weak because the atlas will inevitably contain errors and omission, and it would probably be best to make this crystal clear to the user (and not just in small print either).

Whether or not you can write your way out of potential trouble with clauses like this must be open to question I'd have thought. In court it would probably come down to a question of fitness for purpose, what the buyer might reasonably expect from the product.

Not a lawyer, but I have on occasions been involved in drafting terms and conditions; it's very difficult work. You have to try and second-guess what fools might do and fools can be incredibly ingenious people.

Regards, N.
Caversham, Reading, England.

#5
Green Palolo

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What type of navigation? When I make aerial hazards maps the disclaimer is "Not all hazards are shown, it is the pilot's responsibility to see and avoid hazards."

#6
DanM

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Thanks for the replies--I was just curious if there was any kind of technical specific use of the 'navigation' term. For my current project showing recreational maps in a book, the general book disclaimer will work though I'll probably come up with some disclaimer that's not as blunt as 'not to be used for navigation' in the future (unless it's a cartogram :) )

#7
Nick H

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Thanks for the replies--I was just curious if there was any kind of technical specific use of the 'navigation' term. For my current project showing recreational maps in a book, the general book disclaimer will work though I'll probably come up with some disclaimer that's not as blunt as 'not to be used for navigation' in the future (unless it's a cartogram :) )


Expressions such as 'NOT TO BE USED FOR NAVIGATION' have a military or 'official' ring to them. Perhaps wording like this is used on uncontrolled copies of controlled documents (documents controlled by a management system covering issue, amendment and withdrawal).

Regarding your second point, I think that terms and conditions have to be pretty blunt to provide even the slightest degree of protection :( .

Regards, N.
Caversham, Reading, England.

#8
MostlyHarmless

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So is the term navigation used very specifically in this context, as in using geometric-based tools (compass, GPS, etc.) to allow one to navigate utilizing a 'navigation map'?

Actual navigation maps/data (as used by GPS companies) require highly accurate geometry, among other things. I would imagine it's just a get out clause, as someone mentioned.

#9
Dennis McClendon

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I think the phrase not to be used for navigation only applies to navigational (and aviation) charts, where a government agency has undertaken a certain responsibility to map (and keep current) hazards to navigation, hailing frequencies, light signals, etc. When a portion of the map is reproduced at a different scale, or where its date would not be apparent, the government agency requests that the phrase not to be used for navigation be shown.

Have you seen it on ordinary maps of land?
Dennis McClendon, Chicago CartoGraphics
chicagocarto.com




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