Jump to content

 
Photo

Hyposgraphic Tints

- - - - -

  • Please log in to reply
6 replies to this topic

#1
Crischan

Crischan

    Master Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 199 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Eberswalde, Germany
  • Interests:Spatial Information Design
  • Germany

Hi,

I did a shaded relief today and added a hysographic tint. As I was wondering about the tint to use I then started wondering about other's tints?
Can you give nice looking tints? Best with color codes... ;)

Cheers, Crischan

Attached Files


Crischan Wygoda
http://wygoda.net

#2
Greg

Greg

    Master Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 214 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Ontario
  • Canada

Can you give nice looking tints? Best with color codes... ;)



Try Kuler > http://kuler.adobe.com/
Greg Moore

g r e g @ c a r t o g r a p h i c d e s i g n . c o m
www.cartographicdesign.com

#3
Charles Syrett

Charles Syrett

    Ultimate Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 530 posts
  • Canada

Do you have Imhof's "Cartographic Relief Presentation"? He did a pretty thorough study of different hypso tint sets in that book. You can look them over, pick one, and then create a visual match on your digital file (you didn't mention what app you're using). You may also want to experiment with the colour of the relief itself. You could keep it grey, but try warming or cooling it....or you could try another colour altogether (such as a deep choclate brown - yum). B)

Charles Syrett
Map Graphics
http://www.mapgraphics.com


Hi,

I did a shaded relief today and added a hysographic tint. As I was wondering about the tint to use I then started wondering about other's tints?
Can you give nice looking tints? Best with color codes... ;)

Cheers, Crischan



#4
razornole

razornole

    Legendary Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 448 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Ozark Plateau, Arkansas
  • Interests:Photography, Cartography, Down-river canoeing, Backpacking, Cross country biking, Geomorphology, Ornithology, Ecology, Quaternary, and last but first; drinking beer on the beach.
  • United States

Hello Crischan,

Regardless of the the hue, remember that lighter colors advance and darker colors recede. Therefore, I always make my higher elevations advance with a lighter color and my lower elevations receded with a darker color. Never would I use two different hues on the same map to represent elevation.

Attached is an example of what I am talking about. The hue is green and grades from a light green at the lower elevations to an even light green/almost white at the higher elevations.

kru

Attached Files


"Ah, to see the world with the eyes of the gods is geography--to know cities and tribes, mountains and rivers, earth and sea, this is our gift."
Strabo 22AD

#5
ProMapper

ProMapper

    Master Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 216 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:India
  • Interests:promapper@gmail.com
  • India

Hello Crischan,

Regardless of the the hue, remember that lighter colors advance and darker colors recede. Therefore, I always make my higher elevations advance with a lighter color and my lower elevations receded with a darker color. Never would I use two different hues on the same map to represent elevation.

Attached is an example of what I am talking about. The hue is green and grades from a light green at the lower elevations to an even light green/almost white at the higher elevations.

kru


Hello Kru

The shading on the trail map is really awesome. Could you post outline work flow to achieve this say in ArcGIS or the software you have used, if it is not an absolute business secret :rolleyes: .

Thanks

Anu
http://www.mapsandlocations.com

#6
razornole

razornole

    Legendary Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 448 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Ozark Plateau, Arkansas
  • Interests:Photography, Cartography, Down-river canoeing, Backpacking, Cross country biking, Geomorphology, Ornithology, Ecology, Quaternary, and last but first; drinking beer on the beach.
  • United States

Hello Crischan,

Regardless of the the hue, remember that lighter colors advance and darker colors recede. Therefore, I always make my higher elevations advance with a lighter color and my lower elevations receded with a darker color. Never would I use two different hues on the same map to represent elevation.

Attached is an example of what I am talking about. The hue is green and grades from a light green at the lower elevations to an even light green/almost white at the higher elevations.

kru


Hello Kru

The shading on the trail map is really awesome. Could you post outline work flow to achieve this say in ArcGIS or the software you have used, if it is not an absolute business secret :rolleyes: .

Thanks

Anu
http://www.mapsandlocations.com


Hello Anu,

This is Crischan's thread. I'll most likely post one of my own in a bit. Generally thought, I use GIS for raw data, Photoshop for rasters, and Illustrator for vectors.

kru
"Ah, to see the world with the eyes of the gods is geography--to know cities and tribes, mountains and rivers, earth and sea, this is our gift."
Strabo 22AD

#7
mikeb226

mikeb226

    Key Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 82 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:USA
  • United States

Crischan, those colors look wonderful.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

-->