Jump to content

 
Photo

Where do I start?

- - - - -

  • Please log in to reply
13 replies to this topic

#1
penumbra123

penumbra123

    Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPip
  • 14 posts
  • No Country Selected

Hi,

I'm a full time volunteer for a non-profit in Oregon. I was given ArcGis and was told to find ways the software can track the thousands of clients we serve in the whole state of Oregon.

My ultimate goal is to use ArcGIS to map out all of our clients based on a database of their zipcodes/addresses (geocoding). The graduated symbol or proportional symbol look promising.

I used these tutorials:

"Getting to know ArcGIS," by Ormsby, Napoleon, Burke, Groessl, Feaster
"GIS Tutorial," by Gorr and Kurland.

Unless I missed it, the books were great at showing the different capibilities of the program, but my question is so basic that I'm not sure if the book even thought to cover it. Every tutorial starts with a pre-made map, but the question is, where does one even find a map to start with? I want a map of Oregon which allows me to convert client address to map points based on zipcodes. Is this map publicly available?

thanks!

Frank

#2
James Hines

James Hines

    James Anthony Hines

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 532 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Centreville, Nova Scotia
  • Interests:Cartography, Philosophy, Politics, Psychology, Economics, Occultism, Spiritualism
  • Canada

I'm assuming when you are referring to maps you are actually talking about digital data & a really good place to start is the United States Census:

http://www.census.gov/

The digital data to work in is under Maps & the Tiger links.

Now of course there are many other sources out there but I think census data is always a very good start. I would however highly recommend the Tiger data set if your using roads.

Additionally please check out the following tutorials:

if you have time to read nearly 200 pages of material;

Geocoding in ArcGIS

Proportional Symbols in ArcGIS

"There is much beauty that we fail to see through our own eyes teeming with life forms that give us that perception of our reality.  Leaves on the trees blowing gently in the wind, or scarily, the waves pounding through high surf, or lightly on a warm summer’s day; that opportunity to sit or swim in the water on a white beach.   That comfort to shout, “The universal conscious do you hear me?  I am alive, guide me dear logos towards the path of rightnesses.”  Earned what has been kept, no longer to be absorbed into a life filled with cold damn winds and  that stubborn fog clouding  my vision with nothing but darkness."


#3
razornole

razornole

    Legendary Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 449 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Ozark Plateau, Arkansas
  • Interests:Photography, Cartography, Down-river canoeing, Backpacking, Cross country biking, Geomorphology, Ornithology, Ecology, Quaternary, and last but first; drinking beer on the beach.
  • United States

Hello Frank,

I would start by hiring a professional to create your map with your data. However, I might not have the patients or knack that you do. ArcGIS has a steep learning curve. It took me a good year of forcing myself to learn the program well enough to have some success with it. I was fortunate enough to have fellow students around who could help me when I got stuck.

kru
"Ah, to see the world with the eyes of the gods is geography--to know cities and tribes, mountains and rivers, earth and sea, this is our gift."
Strabo 22AD

#4
penumbra123

penumbra123

    Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPip
  • 14 posts
  • No Country Selected

Thanks for the feeback, I'll start here! At least the 200 pages of ESRI geoencoding tutorial has nice pictures :)

I'm assuming when you are referring to maps you are actually talking about digital data & a really good place to start is the United States Census:

http://www.census.gov/

The digital data to work in is under Maps & the Tiger links.

Now of course there are many other sources out there but I think census data is always a very good start. I would however highly recommend the Tiger data set if your using roads.

Additionally please check out the following tutorials:

if you have time to read nearly 200 pages of material;

Geocoding in ArcGIS

Proportional Symbols in ArcGIS



#5
penumbra123

penumbra123

    Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPip
  • 14 posts
  • No Country Selected

Hello Frank,

I would start by hiring a professional to create your map with your data. However, I might not have the patients or knack that you do. ArcGIS has a steep learning curve. It took me a good year of forcing myself to learn the program well enough to have some success with it. I was fortunate enough to have fellow students around who could help me when I got stuck.

kru


Kru, Thank you for the suggestion! I will at least bring myself up to speed with the basics so I can at least be conversant with a professional when the time comes. I'm a total newbie at this point! :)

Thanks,

Frank

#6
frax

frax

    Hall of Fame

  • Associate Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,299 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Stockholm, Sweden
  • Interests:music, hiking, friends, nature, photography, traveling. and maps!
  • Sweden

Did you get an ESRI Data & Maps cd/dvd with your license? That would have basemap (e.g. state outlines etc) stuff that you could start with.
Hugo Ahlenius
Nordpil - custom maps and GIS
http://nordpil.com/
Twitter

#7
Dennis McClendon

Dennis McClendon

    Hall of Fame

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,078 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Chicago
  • Interests:map design, large-scale maps of cities
  • United States

This kind of thing is much easier with a program such as Microsoft's MapPoint, which your organization may be able to get very cheaply through TechSoup. If this is the only analysis you need to do, spending $200 for MapPoint starts to look pretty good after your third day of trying to figure out how to use ArcGIS.
Dennis McClendon, Chicago CartoGraphics
chicagocarto.com

#8
razornole

razornole

    Legendary Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 449 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Ozark Plateau, Arkansas
  • Interests:Photography, Cartography, Down-river canoeing, Backpacking, Cross country biking, Geomorphology, Ornithology, Ecology, Quaternary, and last but first; drinking beer on the beach.
  • United States

Might also think about some local universities or colleges. They may have some gifted students who are willing to take on a non-profit job like this for relatively cheap. Just a thought if this is the only map (or at least annual map) that your organization may require.

kru
"Ah, to see the world with the eyes of the gods is geography--to know cities and tribes, mountains and rivers, earth and sea, this is our gift."
Strabo 22AD

#9
pfyfield

pfyfield

    Master Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 100 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Portland, Oregon
  • United States

Frank,

Many Oregon datasets available here:

http://www.oregon.go...sdlibrary.shtml

Look at any number of Oregon maps to get a sense of base layers- counties, highways, etc.- that you might need. Try to use data collected from a scale close to the map you're making, and educate yourself on appropriate projections. Is your map to go into an 8.5 x11 document? That'll be about 1:3,000,000 or 1:4,000,000. A wall map would be more like 1:500,000.

And, if this is to go into a printed product, be aware of ArcMap's limitations in this regard.

Let us know how it goes.
Paul Fyfield
Cartographer, Bureau of Land Management
Oregon State Office
Portland, Oregon
pfyfield@blm.gov

#10
Gretchen Peterson

Gretchen Peterson

    Master Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 238 posts
  • United States

Like someone else said, put in the ESRI data DVD that came with your ArcGIS program. Open the ArcMap program, then go to File-->Add Data. Navigate to the ESRI data DVD and go to the U.S. folder. There are layer files in there that are pre-rendered with symbology that looks decent so you'll want to click on those instead of the raw shapefiles. The layer files are shown with an icon that looks like lots of overlapping pieces of paper.

For the geocoding you'll need to get some address data from the census or perhaps that ESRI data DVD has some. I believe there are a few online geocoding sites that may do your geocoding for you for free, however. Then you could just load the output into ArcGIS for viewing.

#11
penumbra123

penumbra123

    Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPip
  • 14 posts
  • No Country Selected

Thank You everyone for your kind replies.

As suggested, I've retrieved some state maps from the ESRI DVD, and wanted to know if it's possible to modify the map so only the state of Oregon is shown? or to cut out the state and discard the rest? This will help with the load time.

Thanks! I'm certain I will ask plenty of questions as the process progresses. So thank you all in advance!

#12
Gretchen Peterson

Gretchen Peterson

    Master Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 238 posts
  • United States

It sounds like you need a quick walk-through of the basic techniques with someone. Give me a call (number is on my website) and I'd be happy to give you 15 minutes of my time to get you going.

#13
penumbra123

penumbra123

    Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPip
  • 14 posts
  • No Country Selected

It sounds like you need a quick walk-through of the basic techniques with someone. Give me a call (number is on my website) and I'd be happy to give you 15 minutes of my time to get you going.


Hi Gretchen,

Thank you for your kind offer! I also noticed you are a Cornell graduate. I will start grad school at Cornell at the end of August, and I am really looking forward to it! What a beautiful campus!

Frank

#14
Gretchen Peterson

Gretchen Peterson

    Master Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 238 posts
  • United States

Yep - Cornell does have a nice campus! Be sure to visit the Plantations while you are there...




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

-->