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Mapping the Ice Floe Edge

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#1
MapLaTerre

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Here's a map I constructed as part of a poster for the "Ecological and Evolutionary Implications of Climate Change Symposium" held at Lakehead Univeristy this week.

The purpose of this map was to illustrate the changing extent of the ice floe edge (the edge of landfast ice) along the eastern coast of Baffin Island between 1990 and 2005 based on observations (Traditional Ecological Knowledge) from local Inuit hunters. Data came directly from the locals who drew their observations onto NTS topo maps. Polar bear sites were also drawn on the raw TEK data maps and were included on my map to substantiate the ice floe edge locations as hunters tend to find polar bears along this ecologically significant feature hunting for seals. It is important to note only polar bear sites included on the raw TEK data maps were mapped here, this means it does not include all sites ever associated with polar bears over the 15 year time period.
This map was created entirely in Corel DrawX4. This jpeg is smaller than 745 KB.

I welcome critiques as it has been a couple years since I've mapped anything -- too busy researching and writing about them for my thesis.

Thanks much!

Attached File  Ice_Floe_Map.zip   632.95KB   197 downloads

#2
MapMedia

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I got a file missing notice when trying to view the map. Would love to see it though!

#3
Hans van der Maarel

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I got a file missing notice when trying to view the map. Would love to see it though!


That was me, I tried to use my mod powers to attach the jpg that was in the zip file but it went bad...
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#4
rudy

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Would it be possible to combine the ice floe edges with the ice cover in the legend? It took me a while to figure out what is what. It might be easier to understand if the legend was simplified a bit. Otherwise, good simple map with out a lot of clutter.

#5
Matthew Hampton

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Very nice map!

My only critiques would be that my eyes would prefer to see the Polar Bear icons filled and not hollow. I am curious why you didn't use a colored polar bear shape instead of the rectangular 'inverse' symbol? In locations where the Polar Bear icons straddle linework (i.e. Duck Island), there is an annoying visual clash in an otherwise clean map.

It also looks like you added a stroke to the "Mapping Traditional..." title, instead of the preferred method for outlining text.

co-cartographic creator of boringmaps.com


#6
MapMedia

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Excellent map! I love traditional knowledge maps. Is this something the Inuits will have as well?
I think you were successful in presenting a complex patchwork of information. I agree with previous comments.

Thanks for sharing!

#7
Matthew Hampton

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I worked on a new Polar Bear Kill Site Icon for you.

What do you think?

Attached File  Picture_120.png   7.26KB   47 downloads



;)

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#8
amyers

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I might try a different pattern for the Areas of Sport Hunting so you could fit more of represenative pattern in the legend entry and it would not get as lost in the 2005 ice cover.

#9
Greg

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I worked on a new Polar Bear Kill Site Icon for you.

What do you think?

Attached File  Picture_120.png   7.26KB   47 downloads



;)



:(
Greg Moore

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www.cartographicdesign.com

#10
Matthew Hampton

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That symbol was in such poor taste I almost didn't post it - the plight of Ursus martimus is a serious issue and that posting should not be construed as indifference to the cause of their survival. Nonetheless, it was sent with a sarcasm that was intended to bring levity to the situation. My apologies if you felt it was intended otherwise.

Their recent inclusion under the ESA as a Threatened Species is indeed a greater cause for fine maps like yours and I hope the awareness your map brings will eventually help bring their population to a non-threatened level.

For a bit of levity here is an intriguing video of polar bears and dogs playing.

co-cartographic creator of boringmaps.com


#11
MapLaTerre

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Would it be possible to combine the ice floe edges with the ice cover in the legend? It took me a while to figure out what is what. It might be easier to understand if the legend was simplified a bit. Otherwise, good simple map with out a lot of clutter.


Funny that you should say that, the "first edition" of this map did just that. The suggestion was made to me that the ice should be seperate in the legend. Live and learn!

Thanks to all of you for the suggestions!

#12
eli

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I agree with the comments about the legend and the icons. Especially the icons! The Arctic Institute has a nice selection, perhaps they have one for polar bears if you're not able to use the inverse?

Also, the extent map seems to be square for the rectangular map??

Would be interesting to know more about your project - I am actually in the middle of creating maps with Use and Occupancy data in that area.

#13
Sue

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Overall good poster. I like your colour scheme and layout. A few suggestions:

-Nunavut is a bit hard to read in the 'Mapped area box'

-The first 6 items on your legend are very difficult for me to distinguish on your map. I spend a few minutes examining your map and still can't really tell where your various flow edges and land edges layers start and stop. Maybe chose another colour than white and light blue or combine some on the legend items. I would suggest using either line symbology or polygon symbology with no outline.

-In your text description of datasource, maybe be a little bit more specific. For example, local residents of where? What data is from the local residents (ie: kill sites or flow edge or all data represent on the map?)

-The polor bear icons have coastline linework going through them is some places, its a little distracting.

-I don't know if the 'open water' item in your legend is necessary. As I don't see any turquiose area on your map surronded by a white border.

-I don't see 'No data' Floe edge anywhere on the map (grey line).

-Will this map be supplemented with any descriptive text? I am assuming your audience is familiar with TEK and/or climate change research, but it always good to let readers know exactly what the map is trying to illustrate / convey, especially when it comes to maps that showcase research.

Hope this helps,

Susan




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