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#1
angel.spatial

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I have been working on a map of the United States for a friend of mine. I wanted as many city locations as possible, with a few specific ones thrown in.

Here is my problem...

There are too many place names that they become illegible and over stacked, especially in ArcGIS. I know I can change the placement properties, but when I do that I lose too many in that case. I was wondering what any of you usually do to "thin" out the text placement without losing too much data. Also, if I "thin" out the text placement, is there a way to "thin" out the points that no longer have a text placed?

Another problem...

When I export as .ai (I don't have access to Mapublisher) the font sizes become "messy." One piece of text will say "1 point" as the size, while another will say "12 point" but they both LOOK the exact same size. Any ideas?

Thanks again!
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#2
Hans van der Maarel

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When I export as .ai (I don't have access to Mapublisher) the font sizes become "messy." One piece of text will say "1 point" as the size, while another will say "12 point" but they both LOOK the exact same size. Any ideas?


The application bar (or whatever Adobe calls it, the bit at the top that changes based on the type of object you have selected) is often slow in updating when you're working with text. Never trust it, always check the Character panel.
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#3
ProMapper

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I have been working on a map of the United States for a friend of mine. I wanted as many city locations as possible, with a few specific ones thrown in.

Here is my problem...

There are too many place names that they become illegible and over stacked, especially in ArcGIS. I know I can change the placement properties, but when I do that I lose too many in that case. I was wondering what any of you usually do to "thin" out the text placement without losing too much data. Also, if I "thin" out the text placement, is there a way to "thin" out the points that no longer have a text placed?

Another problem...

When I export as .ai (I don't have access to Mapublisher) the font sizes become "messy." One piece of text will say "1 point" as the size, while another will say "12 point" but they both LOOK the exact same size. Any ideas?

Thanks again!

Now for the first problem you need to use some attribute data to thin out; say population of the cities. If you do not have the population of various cities in the attribute data, then I can send you one.

For the second problem, just select all the text and move them one pixel up and then back down one pixel in Illustrator. It will fix the font issue. I found same problem a few months back and solution was found here in Cartotalk.

Anu
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#4
James Hines

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When I export as .ai (I don't have access to Mapublisher)


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#5
Charles Syrett

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I would question the basic cartographic approach you're taking, that leads you to have this problem to begin with. You shouldn't just be "thinning out" place names. An essential component of the cartographic process is the selection of information to display. It appears that you've run up against one of the inherent limitations of the GIS-driven approach, which is that you're forced to subtract elements rather than add them.

An attribute such as population can only help so far. In some areas (Arctic Canada comes to mind), very small villages appear even on small-scale maps, because they're the only settlements there.

In this kind of situation, in which I've loaded a dense batch of data (towns, rivers, whatever) into a drawing application (I'm a FreeHand die-hard), I just place all the data onto a layer that will eventually be invisible. On top of that layer, create a mute layer and lock it. Then just select by hand (yes, by hand) the data that you want and move it to the layer you want. Then turn off the "scavenged" data layer. The process is much faster than you might expect, and you'll have more of a feeling that you created the map, rather than some GIS. B)

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I have been working on a map of the United States for a friend of mine. I wanted as many city locations as possible, with a few specific ones thrown in.

Here is my problem...

There are too many place names that they become illegible and over stacked, especially in ArcGIS. I know I can change the placement properties, but when I do that I lose too many in that case. I was wondering what any of you usually do to "thin" out the text placement without losing too much data. Also, if I "thin" out the text placement, is there a way to "thin" out the points that no longer have a text placed?

Another problem...

When I export as .ai (I don't have access to Mapublisher) the font sizes become "messy." One piece of text will say "1 point" as the size, while another will say "12 point" but they both LOOK the exact same size. Any ideas?

Thanks again!



#6
Unit Seven

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If you set up placement based on population so that larger populations (or in our case we have impotance codes allocated to towns based on more than just population) have a higher priority then the small towns in remote areas will still be placed.

Assuming you are doing these as annotations and not labels and you are familiar with placed and unplaced annotations the following should work for you.

Once you have converted your labels to annotations you can then join the tables and use a definition query TownPointsAnno.Status = 0 to only draw the symbols for the placed labels—use the query builder to check the syntax and fieldnames are correct as I'm just going by memeory here.

The nice thing about this way is as you go through an manually tidy up and place (or hide) annotations the symbols will appear or disapper as you go. The join is something like FID in the anno layer to OID in the point layer.

The second problem as Promapper said is to do with Illustrator legacy text. First thing when opening an ai file from arc is select all and use the arrow keys to nudge up then back down to get the legacy text reading correctly.

Hope this helps some.

Cheers.
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#7
Matthew Hampton

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One other approach to take into consideration is the labeling engine. I have found that the Maplex label engine has more "intelligence" than the standard ESRI label engine.

Although we have discovered a bug with respect to kerning in some fonts (Frutiger for one) in 9.3 (sp1&final) when placing labels on a curved path.

co-cartographic creator of boringmaps.com


#8
angel.spatial

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Thank you all so much.

I will definitely take a closer look at ALL of your suggestions, especially UnitSeven's approach. :)
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