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Maps in the Movies

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#16
Jean-Louis

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Thanks Marine girl, that is the picture I was looking for. That's a job I would love to do!
Jean-Louis Rheault
Montreal


#17
Hans van der Maarel

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Thanks Marine girl, that is the picture I was looking for. That's a job I would love to do!


What's stopping you? ;)
Hans van der Maarel - Cartotalk Editor
Red Geographics
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#18
MapMedia

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We need a thought-bubble above the cartographer, something to the effect of "If only I was borne 100 years later, I would be using a Mac and Adobe Creative Suite" :P

#19
Jean-Louis

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Thanks Marine girl, that is the picture I was looking for. That's a job I would love to do!


What's stopping you? ;)


Need a patron... like a wealthy land owner that would like a wall mural of his estate , a church that would like a michelangelesque fresco of the travels of St-Paul or a corporation wanting to depict its holdings in the World. Anybody out there?
Jean-Louis Rheault
Montreal


#20
frax

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Speaking of rich patrons and wall decorations - did you hear about this Czech artist that did a mural for the EU in Brussels with things for each country in the union?
http://news.bbc.co.u...ope/7827738.stm
(much more info on e.g. google news)
Hugo Ahlenius
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http://nordpil.com/
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#21
Jean-Louis

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Speaking of rich patrons and wall decorations - did you hear about this Czech artist that did a mural for the EU in Brussels with things for each country in the union?
http://news.bbc.co.u...ope/7827738.stm
(much more info on e.g. google news)


That is unbelievable!, I can do very good and insulting parodies too but I cant imagine what goes through the head of so called 'artists' who put insulting and worn-out jokes on major commissioned works in that kind of context. Who oversees projects like that? Dont they discuss the content first?
Thanks for sharing that Hugo.
Jean-Louis Rheault
Montreal


#22
Hans van der Maarel

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Who oversees projects like that? Dont they discuss the content first?


Well... it *is* the European Union... so... nobody and no are the most likely answers...
Hans van der Maarel - Cartotalk Editor
Red Geographics
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#23
jjjjjjjijjjjjjj

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I originally posted this question to AskMetaFilter. While there are a ton of very skilled folks there, I suspect that this question was a bit too specialized for them. I searched for an appropriate forum, and came across this site. I've been really edified and excited to read the many thoughtful discussions y'all have had. Thank you so much for that.

At any rate; a question that I hope you find interesting or worthy of discussion:
Imagine you're watching a documentary film about a medium/large U.S. city that you've heard of but never been to. What are some examples (from film, TV news, nature documentaries, etc.) of ways you'd like on-screen mapping imagery to clue you in to the spatial relationships that connect the issues addressed? Maps will be used to illustrate proximity, and will sometimes employ data overlay (point, line, and polygon).

Not AGAINST ultra-sleek, high-tech, bleeding-edge spy-thriller-style graphics... but am prioritizing "easy-to-understand" and "appropriate" above all other considerations. The final product would be for a non-specialist (but fairly learned) audience. For bonus points: the film has a mid-century-modernist theme; would love to see examples of map imagery that takes cues from or pays homage to "high modernism".

(A lifetime ago I worked as a GIS tech; so don't be afraid to speak the lingo. Many thanks for your help, and please feel free to ask any questions that may help clarify.)

#24
Hans van der Maarel

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Since we already had an older topic on this matter, I merged the two.
Hans van der Maarel - Cartotalk Editor
Red Geographics
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#25
Nick H

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That is unbelievable!, I can do very good and insulting parodies too but I cant imagine what goes through the head of so called 'artists' who put insulting and worn-out jokes on major commissioned works in that kind of context. Who oversees projects like that? Dont they discuss the content first?

Well, I'm not so sure. I suppose I must have paid for a bit of this work, but I don't have strong feelings about it. The UK is represented by its absence, so it might be quite appropriate for an artwork standing outside of the European Council building in Bruce.

Regards, N.
Caversham, Reading, England.

#26
Dennis McClendon

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What are some examples (from film, TV news, nature documentaries, etc.) of ways you'd like on-screen mapping imagery to clue you in to the spatial relationships that connect the issues addressed?[/i]

I think birds-eye views (oblique aerials) are one of the best ways to immediately communicate the character of an entire neighborhood or small city. I vaguely remember some scene-setters in Edward Scissorhands of that type.

As for mid-century modernism, a couple of seminal atlases really influenced the look of maps in that era: Richard Edes Harrison's Look at the World and the World Geo-Graphic Atlas designed by Herbert Bayer (all in Futura). Another book you might find inspiring is the school textbook Metropolitan Los Angeles: One Community, a 1949 work by Mel Scott to teach high school students the basics of city planning, designed by Alvin Lustig.
Dennis McClendon, Chicago CartoGraphics
chicagocarto.com

#27
Matthew Hampton

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Have seen Avatar?

3d interactive holography is the ticket!

co-cartographic creator of boringmaps.com


#28
natcase

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Imagine you're watching a documentary film about a medium/large U.S. city that you've heard of but never been to. What are some examples (from film, TV news, nature documentaries, etc.) of ways you'd like on-screen mapping imagery to clue you in to the spatial relationships that connect the issues addressed? Maps will be used to illustrate proximity, and will sometimes employ data overlay (point, line, and polygon).


Depends on the issues in question, and the scale, both temporal and spatial, of the processes involved. The closer they come to real-time and local space, the more "real" you want the imagery to get... a bird's eye like Dennis suggested is a good idea, though reconstructing historic 3D built-up environments is a heckuva task. On the other hand, things like "white flight", being dispersed and long-term processes, might work better with a planimetric, mappy visualization. Maybe this seems obvious, but it's hard to comment in detail without knowing what the details of the question are.

Not AGAINST ultra-sleek, high-tech, bleeding-edge spy-thriller-style graphics... but am prioritizing "easy-to-understand" and "appropriate" above all other considerations. The final product would be for a non-specialist (but fairly learned) audience. For bonus points: the film has a mid-century-modernist theme; would love to see examples of map imagery that takes cues from or pays homage to "high modernism".


The thing is, maps were more "low modern" than "high modern." Road map kitsch and lettering-machine aesthetics are more of the area than sleek, aerodynamic design. Harrison and a few others besides the point. Look at transit maps of the era (I'm particularly fond of Philadelphia's... I have one from 1949 I like a lot)—these were people trying to look dynamic and forward looking, and even they look a little frumpy. Maps were (and to some extent still are) old-fashioned compared to much of the graphic arts.

Nat Case
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