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#1
MapMedia

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Any solutions for filling up blank space on a map?

I come across this every once in a while where a client wants a simple map to cover a single book page or a two page spread - and all of the focus is in the center (not middle) of the map.

#2
frax

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caption? blank space can be very good too.
Hugo Ahlenius
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#3
Hans van der Maarel

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caption? blank space can be very good too.


I agree. If there's nothing to show, there's nothing to show. In ye olde days, cartographers used to put dragons and monsters and stuff in ("because everybody knew they were there anyway"), but we can't do that anymore.

Blank space is great to put other design elements in. A legend, index, captions, locator map etc. Then again, if you're asked to stretch a map to fill an unreasonably large area and adding more detail is not an option, you're in a bit of a dilemma. In cases like that, I usually tell the client about my concerns and see if I can persuade them to go with a smaller map.
Hans van der Maarel - Cartotalk Editor
Red Geographics
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#4
Eric Wolf

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Here be monsters...

#5
DaveB

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"So geographers, in Afric maps,
With savage pictures fill their gaps,
And o’er unhabitable downs
Place elephants for want of towns."
Jonathan Swift
Dave Barnes
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#6
François Goulet

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"So geographers, in Afric maps,
With savage pictures fill their gaps,
And o’er unhabitable downs
Place elephants for want of towns."
Jonathan Swift


Hahahahahahahaha! Love it!

We need to find modern equivalents to Monsters and Elephants to fit the gaps... From my experience, clients don't often see that a elongated feature don't easily fit on a square map... (sigh!)

#7
James Hines

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Depends what you are showing, perhaps some information could be provided especially say if it involves statistics on how the data was derived. For example I created an economic atlas of Maine during my school days & to fill up space I either explained the forumla's to come up with the statistics or for the matter a table showing the differences & percentages.

"There is much beauty that we fail to see through our own eyes teeming with life forms that give us that perception of our reality.  Leaves on the trees blowing gently in the wind, or scarily, the waves pounding through high surf, or lightly on a warm summer’s day; that opportunity to sit or swim in the water on a white beach.   That comfort to shout, “The universal conscious do you hear me?  I am alive, guide me dear logos towards the path of rightnesses.”  Earned what has been kept, no longer to be absorbed into a life filled with cold damn winds and  that stubborn fog clouding  my vision with nothing but darkness."


#8
Unit Seven

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In ye olde days, cartographers used to put dragons and monsters and stuff in ("because everybody knew they were there anyway"), but we can't do that anymore.


Who says we can't?! ;)
S a m B r o w n

U N I T S E V E N
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#9
Hans van der Maarel

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In ye olde days, cartographers used to put dragons and monsters and stuff in ("because everybody knew they were there anyway"), but we can't do that anymore.


Who says we can't?! ;)


Everybody knows there's no monsters... I guess we'll have to settle for the next best thing: monster trucks! :P
Hans van der Maarel - Cartotalk Editor
Red Geographics
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#10
MapMedia

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caption? blank space can be very good too.

In ye olde days, cartographers used to put dragons and monsters and stuff in ("because everybody knew they were there anyway"), but we can't do that anymore.


Yep - I have a collection of modern day 'sea monsters' such as Bid Laden's cave, etc. I could place in blank spaces - might have to do that more often.

#11
Greg

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If you are covering a a large area, you could always fill in the gaps with a few insets of city level detail.
I do this a lot when making wall map layouts. Geography is not usually symmetrical.

I think from now on though, I will use elephants instead of insets.. yep. who doesn't like elephants?
Greg Moore

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www.cartographicdesign.com

#12
BioGeoMan

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What about adding some sort of design element(s) that relate to the content of the map? I know some clients like it simple, but often you can exercise a bit of creativity by adding graphics to the overall map space that compliment, but not overwhelm the message of the map.

Thanks,
M.

Michael Scisco

BioGeoCreations
Albuquerque, NM

505-603-3636
biogeocreations.com


#13
MapMedia

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Lots of good ideas here...thanks!

#14
Matthew Hampton

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Embrace the white space and exploit it. White space is your friend.

That said - an inset map or overview map can be used pretty effectively (if you are mapping at a scale that is larger than 1:1). :ph34r:

co-cartographic creator of boringmaps.com


#15
P Riggs

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If you are covering a a large area, you could always fill in the gaps with a few insets of city level detail.


I agree with Greg.

Or you could do what old maps did and use a texture or dark color fill for those areas.
Examples from my website:
Tavernier's Description Du Pays Armorique A Pres Bretaigne
Erwin Raisz's Map of the Lower Nile
Texture can fill in white space quite nicely.
Philip Riggs
Decorative-Maps.com




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