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#1
peanut

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We have put together a new website that shows stream flow and stage, rainfall, humidity, temperature, and wind data using the Google Maps API. The data is collected by the Lower Colorado River Authority hydromet system for sites in and around the Colorado River Basin in Texas. The watersheds, streams and counties are tile layers that were made using ArcGIS server.

Take a look at http://hydromet.lcra.org and let me know what you think.

Rich

#2
Esther Mandeno

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Hello Rich,

I think you did an amazing job trying to get all that real-time information in a format that is understandable. Good job! However, is it possible to tone down the streams? I ended up turning them off because they were so distracting. I'm in California, so I don't really have a need to visit your website for hydrologic data in Texas, but if I was a hydrologist in Texas, I'd be more interested in the point data read outs than where the streams/lakes are.
Just my 2 cents worth!

Thanks for sharing!

We have put together a new website that shows stream flow and stage, rainfall, humidity, temperature, and wind data using the Google Maps API. The data is collected by the Lower Colorado River Authority hydromet system for sites in and around the Colorado River Basin in Texas. The watersheds, streams and counties are tile layers that were made using ArcGIS server.

Take a look at http://hydromet.lcra.org and let me know what you think.

Rich


------
Esther Mandeno
Life is like riding a bicycle. To keep your balance you must keep moving. - Albert Einstein

#3
peanut

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Esther,

Thanks for your comments! The streams are in a tile cache. The next time I rebuild the tile cache I will talk it up around here and give some consideration to toning down the streams. Now that I look at it from this perspective the streams are a bit dominant on some of the zoom levels.

Rich

Hello Rich,

I think you did an amazing job trying to get all that real-time information in a format that is understandable. Good job! However, is it possible to tone down the streams? I ended up turning them off because they were so distracting. I'm in California, so I don't really have a need to visit your website for hydrologic data in Texas, but if I was a hydrologist in Texas, I'd be more interested in the point data read outs than where the streams/lakes are.
Just my 2 cents worth!

Thanks for sharing!

We have put together a new website that shows stream flow and stage, rainfall, humidity, temperature, and wind data using the Google Maps API. The data is collected by the Lower Colorado River Authority hydromet system for sites in and around the Colorado River Basin in Texas. The watersheds, streams and counties are tile layers that were made using ArcGIS server.

Take a look at http://hydromet.lcra.org and let me know what you think.

Rich



#4
dshaw

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We have put together a new website that shows stream flow and stage, rainfall, humidity, temperature, and wind data using the Google Maps API. The data is collected by the Lower Colorado River Authority hydromet system for sites in and around the Colorado River Basin in Texas. The watersheds, streams and counties are tile layers that were made using ArcGIS server.

Take a look at http://hydromet.lcra.org and let me know what you think.

Rich



Rich,
The map looks great. Inspirational, really. I don't really have any major comments, and think the site works well as it is. One thing I couldn't readily find, however, as Station Informatio. Perhaps it might also be useful to zoom the map or link to a map with information (location, watershed area, available paramters, etc.) for that particular site, in addition to being able to view the current data.

I am a hydrologist with a number of real time stream gages and weather stations in Central California and am working on putting together something similar, so I have all sorts of questions for you. I'm wondering what your impression of ArcServer has been, and whether you experimented with using only Google Maps API to simply link to data from a station. Do you see other major graphical advantages of using ArcServer for this purpose?

I'm also curious if you wrote the code to interface and/or convert the real-time data to Arc-accessible files, or used an off-the-shelf product.

Thanks in advance,
Dave




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