Jump to content

 
Photo

I need help on a school project!

- - - - -

  • Please log in to reply
3 replies to this topic

#1
thruhiker

thruhiker

    Newbie

  • New Member
  • Pip
  • 2 posts
  • No Country Selected

Hey guys, I'm a student in college, and I'm starting my first gis project. My topics are either the National Animal Identification System (NAIS) or the Key Deer of Florida. My being new to research, I'm having trouble coming up with specific goals to work towrd using gis. Can anyone suggest some ideas about how to fill out a project using this data? For instance, I was thinking a tracking analysis on specific bacteria via data from the NAIS program, or maybe an analysis on Key Deer relocation using factors such as island carrying capacity. Any suggestions would help--big ideas or small! Thanks for the help!

Drew

#2
Hans van der Maarel

Hans van der Maarel

    CartoTalk Editor-in-Chief

  • Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,887 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:The Netherlands
  • Interests:Cartography, GIS, history, popular science, music.
  • Netherlands

Hi Drew, and welcome to Cartotalk.

Those are some rather broad questions. I would like to counter by asking you a question:

Which topic do you feel most connected to?

Immediately followed by:

For which topic is the most data available?

From the sounds of it, both could be very interested, though I'm leaning towards the Key Deer one. NAIS seems rather general.

So, if you were to choose for the deer, here's some steps to get you going (all written without knowing a single thing about those deer, so if I make an obvious mistake, please bear with me).

- Establish how big an area of land is needed to support one adult deer.
- Try to find out how many deer are currently living on the islands and from there, identify the ones that are stretched to their limits (in terms of supporting deer), or close to it.
- Identify islands with similar geographic/ecological conditions but no existing deer populations (or populations well under the limit of what the island can support) as potential targets for relocation. Bonus points if there's no human presence on the islands.

This would be a fairly typical GIS scenario. Hope this helps!
Hans van der Maarel - Cartotalk Editor
Red Geographics
Email: hans@redgeographics.com / Twitter: @redgeographics

#3
thruhiker

thruhiker

    Newbie

  • New Member
  • Pip
  • 2 posts
  • No Country Selected

Hans, thanks for replying. Indeed, I feel most connected to the Key Deer, as I've done some non-gis projects in the past on them. Moreover, the data is plentiful and readily available (including everyting you mentions as identifiers). I will use the Key Deer as my topic. However, I'm sure there will be more questions to follow! Thanks again.

Drew

#4
MapMedia

MapMedia

    Hall of Fame

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,029 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Davis, California
  • United States

Hi Drew,

Think of an issue important to Key Deer conservation, behavior, etc., that you feel is under-addressed or otherwise fundamental. I would caution to not try to be super original (ground breaking work) or complicated (simplicity is key) since this is not a masters thesis (yet B) ).

Also, get acquainted with which GIS tools and functions you want to learn through this paper.

Then combine the two - writing down the hypothesis and method.

You should also keep a sharp eye out for data sources (state of Florida GIS site, federal and state wildlife agencies): landcover (food), roads (barriers or mortality zones), and any ecological data from wildlife agencies (herd counts, mortality, etc.). Heck, call up a Key Deer biologist with the state and talk about Key Deer issues.

Hope this helps a little- Keep us posted!




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

-->