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Mount St Helens Oblique view

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#1
Hans van der Maarel

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Been toying a bit with Visual Nature Studio 3 today (in preparation for my presentation at NACIS)

This is a composite of 2 views (one with a DEM and DRG after the 1980 eruption, one with a DEM from before the eruption and regular grey ground effect). I put a 120% vertical exaggeration on the terrain to make it slightly more dramatic.

Compositing was done in Photoshop. Removed everything from the "pre-blast" image except the very top of the mountain that got blown off.

Attached File  StHelensCombo.jpg   151.54KB   228 downloads

Not too keen on the strata bands myself. Haven't really gotten the hang of them yet...
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#2
James Hines

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Crust is too dominant.

"There is much beauty that we fail to see through our own eyes teeming with life forms that give us that perception of our reality.  Leaves on the trees blowing gently in the wind, or scarily, the waves pounding through high surf, or lightly on a warm summer’s day; that opportunity to sit or swim in the water on a white beach.   That comfort to shout, “The universal conscious do you hear me?  I am alive, guide me dear logos towards the path of rightnesses.”  Earned what has been kept, no longer to be absorbed into a life filled with cold damn winds and  that stubborn fog clouding  my vision with nothing but darkness."


#3
frax

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What is it that you were interested in communicating here?

(looks to me like someone just crumpled up the map - don't you hate it when people don't know how to fold them properly!)
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#4
MapMedia

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Wow Hans, that is very interesting. Well done. It appears the view is facing southeast. Maybe a north arrow would help.
In terms of presentation, my eye had trouble visualizing the area of impact and the magnitude of it.

One thought I had was to use the pre-eruption DEM for the terrain, and overlap it with post-eruption DRG, an possibly add
a red back tint to highlight the eruption areas. This way the contour lines would trace the impact area.

Is there a way to show volume of mtn lost from eruption (cubic miles, etc.)?

Chris

#5
Hans van der Maarel

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Wow Hans, that is very interesting. Well done. It appears the view is facing southeast. Maybe a north arrow would help.
In terms of presentation, my eye had trouble visualizing the area of impact and the magnitude of it.

One thought I had was to use the pre-eruption DEM for the terrain, and overlap it with post-eruption DRG, an possibly add
a red back tint to highlight the eruption areas. This way the contour lines would trace the impact area.

Is there a way to show volume of mtn lost from eruption (cubic miles, etc.)?


The southeast facing view did confuse me as well (especially since the north facing text on the DRG is readable, but upside-down). Then again, the crater is what makes Mount St Helens so special. If you'd look at it from the south, it's a lot less interesting (might as well be looking at Rainier, Hood, Baker or any of the other Pacific Northwest volcanos).

North arrow and some indication of scale is a good idea. Obviously scale depends on where in the perspective you are, but I can make a scale bar for the leading edge of the block model.

The area that got lost in the eruption (which is what I wanted to show) is actually visible as the greyish tint. I guess I should have added some explanations to it :)
Hans van der Maarel - Cartotalk Editor
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#6
DaveB

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Very cool, Hans! I've seen before and after views of the mountain, but showing the missing part really highlights how big the part that got blown away was.

The only criticism I have is that the base (brown area) of the block diagram seems very thick. Maybe just personal preference, but it almost overpowers the rest of the image.
Dave Barnes
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#7
Hans van der Maarel

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Very cool, Hans! I've seen before and after views of the mountain, but showing the missing part really highlights how big the part that got blown away was.

The only criticism I have is that the base (brown area) of the block diagram seems very thick. Maybe just personal preference, but it almost overpowers the rest of the image.


Yeah, James said the same thing basically. The more I look at it, the more I start feeling the same way. I might try this with a black background, or a lighter base, or both.
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#8
Jean-Louis

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My suggestion is just to crop. Make that fascinating crater area large and central. The base serves no purpose unless you have a unusual and creative way to make it look interesting in its own right. Great job!
Jean-Louis Rheault
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#9
Charles Syrett

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Right -- how about a colourful geological cross-section there, showing all the toil and trouble below the surface? :)

Charles Syrett
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My suggestion is just to crop. Make that fascinating crater area large and central. The base serves no purpose unless you have a unusual and creative way to make it look interesting in its own right. Great job!



#10
Matthew Hampton

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Very nice rendering Hans!

I would echo the others in removing a thousand meters of the earth's brown crust. Although Charles suggestion of doing a subsurface cut-away showing the vulcanism would be cool. You could also use the area for explanations or even slap some actual photo's of the before/after.

Attached File  Sthelens1.jpg   42.65KB   40 downloads
Attached File  Mt_St_Helens.JPG   37.5KB   38 downloads

It might also look neat to fully render the top of the mountain - but remove the top and raise-it up a thousand meters. I think seeing the entire crater would give a good sense of volume. The transparency seems a little compromising. Another approach would be to put the fully rendered before/after images side-by-side so the viewer can compare.

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#11
MapMedia

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I was thinking the extra thick crust could be used to show the location of one of Dick Cheney's bunkers in relation to the eruption impact area.
It is believed to exist 5 miles below the cone, if that helps. :)

#12
Clark Geomatics

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Been toying a bit with Visual Nature Studio 3 today (in preparation for my presentation at NACIS)

This is a composite of 2 views (one with a DEM and DRG after the 1980 eruption, one with a DEM from before the eruption and regular grey ground effect). I put a 120% vertical exaggeration on the terrain to make it slightly more dramatic.

Compositing was done in Photoshop. Removed everything from the "pre-blast" image except the very top of the mountain that got blown off.

Attached File  StHelensCombo.jpg   151.54KB   228 downloads

Not too keen on the strata bands myself. Haven't really gotten the hang of them yet...


Looks good Hans. Couple of niggly points for you - the base and overlay don't appear to be properly clipped on the right-hand side (of image). Maybe you could tilt the model a little towards the audience to emphasize the crater.

You probably know this already - over the last five years, a large "whaleback" feature has grown (and continues to grow) inside the crater - it would make an interesting addition to the display. Kind of like a "pre-eruption", "post-eruption" and "present day" montage. I think the USGS offers the data up on one of there servers (not positive though).

In terms of showing the post-eruption changes, you could always animate between two fully rendered views. Maybe a transparent red would work as well for a static display.

Not sure if you are going to include additional info on the image - it's always interesting to see stats on volumes, temperature and other pertinent eruption info in the form of a Harper's Index.
Cheers,

Jeff Clark
Principal
www.clarkgeomatics.ca

#13
Hans van der Maarel

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Thanks for all the comments.

I did consider making a cut-away, but I'd have to know a little bit more about volcanoes than I do now to do that properly :)

I found the DEM's describing the growth of the dome inside the crater, quite interesting and certainly something I could try incorporating. However, given my limited time and specific goal (using it as a sample project to show some of the features of VNS 3 at PCD in 2 weeks) I don't think that's going to make it :(
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#14
Hans van der Maarel

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Another "before-and-after" comparison, taken in account the comments that were made. Attempted to make a more natural looking render rather than using the (upside down anyway) DRG. Not very scientific (i.e. I didn't spend too much time figuring out what goes where) but it looks reasonable to me, based on photos and what I remember from visiting the place myself, 2 years ago. Probabely the "Post" image should not have so much lush vegetation so close to the crater? From what I recall, it's bare rock/rubble.

Attached File  block_model2.jpg   147.66KB   79 downloads

The "Pre" DEM is much coarser than the "Post" one, which causes some of the weird snow effects at the top.

Also figured out how to do a colored anaglyph:

Attached File  StHelensAnaglyph.jpg   147.3KB   55 downloads
Hans van der Maarel - Cartotalk Editor
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#15
DaveB

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Those look pretty cool, too! Although I did like seeing the blown away part in the same image with the aftereffect. For me it made a much bigger impact. Plus you don't have to go back and forth netween 2 maps/images to compare.
Dave Barnes
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