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#1
Derek Tonn

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Hello everyone!

I am wondering if anyone might be able to help me with a "pet project" of mine. I am trying to compile a "history of campus mapping" of sorts for a new web site launch that I am currently working on for my firm, and I am wondering what sort of advice, information and graphics that any of you might be willing to share. In particular, I am looking for:

- Early examples of maps from colleges and universities from around the world. Any examples from the 17th-18th century through the 1970s-1980s would be ideal.
- Information on firms who have played a prominent role in the industry over the past several decades....PREFERRABLY firms who once dominated the industry but are now defunct or a much smaller version of their former self.
- Any links to samples of firms who have specialized in the various genres of campus map development (2D perspective, 3D perspective/illustrated, isometric, hand-rendered, vector, raster, hybrids, etc.)

We (tonnhaus) are working to become known as one of "the" campus mapping firms in North America, and are also anxious to do as much as we can to grow the industry as a whole. We currently link to roughly 20 other mapping firms out there (http://www.tonnhaus.com/designcart.htm), but are looking to develop a MUCH more comprehensive resource and educational service related to campus mapping as a whole.

Thanks in advance for your help!

Derek
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#2
Nick Springer

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The one thing I could add this discussion is that I have noticed a lot of campus maps are produced on that campus, either by an affiliated cartography lab, or facilities department.

I bet you could find a lot of historical ones at the individual university libraries, but that would be a lot of leg-work.

Nick Springer

Director of Design and Web Applications: ALK Technologies Inc.
Owner: Springer Cartographics LLC


#3
Derek Tonn

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The one thing I could add this discussion is that I have noticed a lot of campus maps are produced on that campus, either by an affiliated cartography lab, or facilities department.

I bet you could find a lot of historical ones at the individual university libraries, but that would be a lot of leg-work.


Nick,

Yes, I would estimate that roughly 50-60 percent of all campus mapping projects are actually completed on-campus rather than as a result of hiring outside vendors such as us. I would be thrilled to track-down samples of all of the in-house work as well....although I guess the primary goal of my research/effort is to come up with examples and histories of designers and companies that completed projects as an outside contractor.

The one firm I have come across a LOT related to historical hand-rendered maps from the 1970s and 1980s is Perspecto (PerspectoVision) - http://www.perspecto.com/ They FINALLY updated their web site over the past few months after a several-year hiatus, so I know they still exist. However, they have seemingly been losing clients and market share for the past several years.....primarily (from what I hear) related to pricing and their hard-core stance on reprint and copyright issues. I know my own firm has at LEAST 4-5 of their former clients that have hired us over the past 2-3 years, and that number will only increase now that North Illustrations, one of Perspecto's chief competitors, is officially a part of our firm (as of August 1, 2005).

At some institutions, it's not even clear which maps (or how many) are done in-house vs. outside contractors. The University of Minnesota, for example, has I think 6-7 different departments that claim some authority over "official" maps at their Twin Cities campuses....which makes the process of tracking down information a challenge, for sure.

At any rate, thanks for posting in my discussion topic! I wish I could meet with all of you in-person in Salt Lake! However, I never really seemed to "fit" very well into NACIS' core member groups. That, and I promised my wife I'd stick more close to home now that we're expecting the birth of our second child not-too-long from now..... B)

Thanks!

Derek
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http://www.mapformation.com

#4
EcoGraphic

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Campus Masterplanning Maps

It would be worth noting when the 'modern' campus as we know it started to arrive on the scene. Before the onslaught of accessible education in the 1960s ? a lot of campus designs had their origins in religious institutions such as convents which were intended 'shelter' their inhabitants from the world.

I only mention this, because the whole concept of 'planning' a campus for student interaction would have started to take hold in the 1960s. Landscape architects have been responsible for a lot of the campus masterplanning that has taken place over the decades, and I wonder if the modern campus map doesn't have some of its origins in the masterplan drawings which would have been produced for these campuses. Scale models would have also been constructed of the campus, so a campus map in axonometric is almost a compromise between a scale model and 2D masterplan of the campus. It is a shot in the dark, but probably worth looking at.

Clearly panoramic maps and aerial perspectives have been around for a long time, but the campus map as a wayfinding tool is a little different that an historic panorama.


Shaker Village Folk Maps

I would highly recommend this book if you if you are interested in examples of pseudo-perspective illustrations in folk art, and folk maps. Alibris has some very affordable copies right now:

Shaker Village Views

This book is a collection of Shaker village drawings and maps, with a large number done in pseudo-perspective. All of the artists were un-trained so it is an interesting study. Interesting to note the parallels between a village and a campus as well.

Gillian
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#5
Mike H

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Derek,

I have digital scans of several old campus maps of the University of Maine; going back to the 1800s. We produced an exhibition of these maps on campus last year. Some are actual campus maps, others are campus map plans from the famous Olmsted firm, which the landscape architects love. Not all of the Olmsted's plans were implemeted by the university, although they were retained for several years as planners/advisors. The design symetry is quite pleasing, although ultimately proved unpractical. I can send you these on a CD - they are not on-line.

You can find a subset of modern UMaine campus maps I've produced on our website:

www.umaine.edu/canam

plus maps of the University of Southern Maine campuses which we produce. You're welcome to any of them - they are linked and downloadable. They are not of the 3D genre.

Concerning 3D campus maps - look at Penn State's campus maps, these were developed by David DiBiase in the early 90s, and the database has been maintained ever since. I worked on these in 94-95 as a student of David's. I'm sure several other people on this list tweaked them during their internships as well. They were originally done in Freehand 3, I believe, and have since migrated to Illustrator. Shaun Faith is the current PSU cartographer, still within DiBiase's lab.

http://www.campusmaps.psu.edu/print/

University of Oregon has an excellent website with a unique subset of campus map themes, these are under Jim Meacham's direction, along with Ken Kato and Erik Steiner.

http://geography.uor...s/uowebmap.html

You should also talk to Nat Case at Professor Pathfinder.

At NACIS last year I requested campus maps from the attendee's and have a large collection of them, I'll look through to see if any 3D versions stand out. I intended to write a paper about the design of campus maps, but that has been put on one of the back burners as of late. Too many maps to make!

Hope this helps your quest,

mike
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#6
Derek Tonn

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Campus Masterplanning Maps

It would be worth noting when the 'modern' campus as we know it started to arrive on the scene. Before the onslaught of accessible education in the 1960s ? a lot of campus designs had their origins in religious institutions such as convents which were intended 'shelter' their inhabitants from the world.

I only mention this, because the whole concept of 'planning' a campus for student interaction would have started to take hold in the 1960s.  Landscape architects have been responsible for a lot of the campus masterplanning that has taken place over the decades, and I wonder if the modern campus map doesn't have some of its origins in the masterplan drawings which would have been produced for these campuses. Scale models would have also been constructed of the campus, so a campus map in axonometric is almost a compromise between a scale model and 2D masterplan of the campus. It is a shot in the dark, but probably worth looking at.

Clearly panoramic maps and aerial perspectives have been around for a long time, but the campus map as a wayfinding tool is a little different that an historic panorama.


Shaker Village Folk Maps

I would highly recommend this book if you if you are interested in examples of pseudo-perspective illustrations in folk art, and folk maps. Alibris has some very affordable copies right now:

Shaker Village Views

This book is a collection of Shaker village drawings and maps, with a large number done in pseudo-perspective. All of the artists were un-trained so it is an interesting study. Interesting to note the parallels between a village and a campus as well.

Gillian


Thanks for your very thoughtful reply, Gillian! I have come across campus maps as far back as the 1700s (primarily in Europe and the eastern seaboard of the United States), but the vast....VAST majority of maps that I find of college and university campuses have been from the 1920s to current.

I also enjoyed your comments about scale models. Actually, I have had two campuses ask us if we could make scale models of a campus under glass, for installation into a large foyer or common area. My response was "No (or not yet), but I'll help you find someone who does that sort of thing." The interesting thing, however, is that VERY few people, outside of the occasional architect working on their own client's building projects, produce these types of products. It got my wheels turning though regarding another map-related product that some of us might be able to offer down the road...but it just hasn't been high enough on my own priority list to do anything about it as of yet. I was also in San Diego, CA last weekend and stopped by a visitors center that had a scale model of wood blocks of the entire downtown area. Very interesting to look at!

I'll definitely look into that Shaker Village information more in the coming days, and I appreciate the reference very much! :)

Derek
Derek Tonn
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http://www.mapformation.com

#7
Derek Tonn

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Derek,

I have digital scans of several old campus maps of the University of Maine; going back to the 1800s.  We produced an exhibition of these maps on campus last year. Some are actual campus maps, others are campus map plans from the famous Olmsted firm, which the landscape architects love. Not all of the Olmsted's plans were implemeted by the university, although they were retained for several years as planners/advisors. The design symetry is quite pleasing, although ultimately proved unpractical. I can send you these on a CD - they are not on-line.

You can find a subset of modern UMaine campus maps I've produced on our website:

www.umaine.edu/canam

plus maps of the University of Southern Maine campuses which we produce.  You're welcome to any of them - they are linked and downloadable. They are not of the 3D genre.

Concerning 3D campus maps - look at Penn State's campus maps, these were developed by David DiBiase in the early 90s, and the database has been maintained ever since. I worked on these in 94-95 as a student of David's. I'm sure several other people on this list tweaked them during their internships as well. They were originally done in Freehand 3, I believe, and have since migrated to Illustrator. Shaun Faith is the current PSU cartographer, still within DiBiase's lab.

http://www.campusmaps.psu.edu/print/

University of Oregon has an excellent website with a unique subset of campus map themes, these are under Jim Meacham's direction, along with Ken Kato and Erik Steiner.

http://geography.uor...s/uowebmap.html

You should also talk to Nat Case at Professor Pathfinder.

At NACIS last year I requested campus maps from the attendee's and have a large collection of them, I'll look through to see if any 3D versions stand out. I intended to write a paper about the design of campus maps, but that has been put on one of the back burners as of late. Too many maps to make!

Hope this helps your quest,

mike


Thanks Mike!

Those Penn State 3D maps look as though they are more of a 2D/3D "hybrid". However, for a campus of that size, you really have to have more of an "overhead" view in order to fit the 200+ buildings within a 11"x17" printed piece.

The "Night Map" at the University of Oregon Eugene is an interesting concept! Our firm has never been asked to design a map based on available natural/artificial light sources as of yet. I've always wanted to try and make a few "ultra-accessible" maps of a campus or downtown area....something that has a HEAVY focus on wheelchair accessibility and/or sound references rather than sight references for the visually impaired. However, there are only 24 hours in a day....and no one has yet hired us to develop such a map as a paid project to this point.

Nat's been on my list to contact at Hedberg Maps for the past several months. I spoke with Nat and a colleague of his via email a few years back, when I was just getting my firm off the ground. However, now is probably the time to revisit with him about the potential for collaborative efforts, now that our firm has a strong foundation of clients and services. That, and the fact that his offices are only about two hours drive-time away from mine! :)

If you ever need/want any help writing a paper or article related to campus map design, please let me know. I really want to develop a strong educational component for the next iteration of our firm's web site, and have been working on researching history.....competitors.....style variations, etc. for the past several months.

Thanks!

Derek
Derek Tonn
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mapformation, LLC

datonn@mapformation.com
http://www.mapformation.com

#8
EcoGraphic

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If you have been asked to produce a scale model for a client you should check around with some of your local landscape architecture firms. Because landscape architects do masterplanning, streetscape design, urban design, waterfront redesign, urban park design, etc. our models are much larger than your standard architectural models. The trouble is that people always have the perception that we are 'yardscape architects' (including the building architects) so they don't think to ask us! :)

Anyhow, if you check around there should be a firm that could build a model for you. A lot of work is obviously just done digitally now as far as models are concerned, but traditional models definately have their advantages. If a local firm cannot construct the model, they should know of a firm that does. You could also check with a model shop.

You could also check the American Society of Landscape Architects website for firms:
http://www.asla.org


Cheers,

Gillian
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#9
Mike H

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Lawrence Faulkner and his team are the leading resource for scale models of a map based nature:

http://stm-usa.com/

A cart firm usually works with them to provide the overall base image and design effects, they produce a stunning model which can be done in a variety of materials. They can do the work independently, but mostly it is a partnership type of relationship. An amazing process, but out the price range of most clients.

Still, don't underestimate the grant capabilities or overall donor resources that may be available - we've been hoping to find the resources to do a piece for the Gulf of Maine, including bathymetry - in conjunction with a museum or aquarium as the client-university relationship. These are really nice interpretive installations, if you can make it happen.

m.
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#10
Derek Tonn

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Thanks Mike.

It looked as though most of Solid Terrain Modeling's portfolio was terrain/relief maps, as opposed to the depiction of buildings. However, I'll give Lawrence a call to see what they might have to offer along those lines. I know I could have referred at LEAST two of those types of projects in the past if I had known where to direct them, so hopefully STM or someone else would be able to be a nice referral partner of our in the months and years to come.
Derek Tonn
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#11
Mike H

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Let us know what he tells you - last year they were talking about being able to do building level detail, perhaps from LIDAR data - but I don't know how far they pushed it.

Lawrence actually invented the process that has become his company, it is a classic story: "oh yeah, well, I built this thing in my garage that took DEM data and ported it to a cutting mill..."

m.
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