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#1
MostlyHarmless

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EDIT: removed

#2
Hans van der Maarel

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After some searching and reading, it seems that many of you use Adobe Illustrator to make transit maps. Is there a reason for using this program? Can Photoshop or GIMP be used for this task? I know only a little about PS and GIMP (mostly have experience in ArcGIS), but I would love to begin making some transit maps. Perhaps Dennis could shed some light on this subject. :)


Of course Photoshop or GIMP could be used, but they're both raster applications. Doing this in Illustrator, or another vector application will make it a *lot* easier. Things like re-ordering the lines or changing styles are very easy to accomplish that way.
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#3
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I've been playing around with Inkscape and Illustrator. I just can't seem to get the hang of it. ...but I do see why it would be a lot easier, thanks!

#4
Matthew Hampton

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I've been playing around with Inkscape and Illustrator. I just can't seem to get the hang of it. ...but I do see why it would be a lot easier, thanks!


I think the differences b/w raster software (PS, Gimp) and vector software (AI, inkscape) imply that vector software is a better choice for transit maps in that they are linear in nature and are most efficiently depicted as vectors.

Since ArcGIS has evolved into an efficient analyzer/retriever of vector data, migrating the transit line-work over to vector design software for map finishing makes the most sense.

That said - I've seen some good transit maps that are jpegs. ;)

co-cartographic creator of boringmaps.com


#5
Dennis McClendon

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A well-designed transit map is actually done with pencil and tracing paper and thinking. Several versions, experimenting with different options and different geometries. Once you have the basic ideas worked out, you use some sort of tool to execute your design. It's hard to believe that a raster image editor or GIS would be the most efficient way to move simple geometric objects and labels around. With FreeHand or Illustrator, when you want to move something a little to the left, you just point to it and, uhhh, move it a little to the left.

Anyway, this gives me the opportunity to show something I've been working on for a new map of O‘ahu. Honolulu has an excellent bus system, but it's not visible to visitors because the buses take various one-way streets as they move between destinations. So I'm attempting to show the lines with short headways and all-day service, and to show a destination such as the state capitol complex as a single "stop" even though the bus stops may be at various corners for different lines:

Attached Files


Dennis McClendon, Chicago CartoGraphics
chicagocarto.com

#6
MostlyHarmless

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when you want to move something a little to the left, you just point to it and, uhhh, move it a little to the left.

lol, I gotcha. Thanks for the help. I'll try to work a little bit more on it...I should be able to find some simple tutorials on the web. :-]

#7
Paul H

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Anyway, this gives me the opportunity to show something I've been working on for a new map of O‘ahu. Honolulu has an excellent bus system, but it's not visible to visitors because the buses take various one-way streets as they move between destinations. So I'm attempting to show the lines with short headways and all-day service, and to show a destination such as the state capitol complex as a single "stop" even though the bus stops may be at various corners for different lines:


When I look at your transit map, I perceive that I can take a bus to the Capitol, get off the bus, and stand there and wait to transfer to another route. But from your description, I think I may be standing at the wrong corner.

#8
Rob

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A well-designed transit map is actually done with pencil and tracing paper and thinking. Several versions, experimenting with different options and different geometries. Once you have the basic ideas worked out, you use some sort of tool to execute your design. It's hard to believe that a raster image editor or GIS would be the most efficient way to move simple geometric objects and labels around. With FreeHand or Illustrator, when you want to move something a little to the left, you just point to it and, uhhh, move it a little to the left.

Anyway, this gives me the opportunity to show something I've been working on for a new map of O‘ahu. Honolulu has an excellent bus system, but it's not visible to visitors because the buses take various one-way streets as they move between destinations. So I'm attempting to show the lines with short headways and all-day service, and to show a destination such as the state capitol complex as a single "stop" even though the bus stops may be at various corners for different lines:


make sure you get some field research in ;)

#9
Dennis McClendon

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Yes, I understand the concern about the different bus stops, and I'll have a note in the accompanying text. But my theory was that in Honolulu's climate, it wasn't too burdensome to walk from one side of Ala Moana Center or the Capitol complex to another. The actual routing of the buses is shown on this accompanying downtown map:

I certainly wish I could have come to do fieldwork on this, but I didn't want to go this time of year (Chicago's weather is nicer than O‘ahu's in summer). It's been many years since I drew such a detailed map of a place I've never been.

Attached Files


Dennis McClendon, Chicago CartoGraphics
chicagocarto.com

#10
Rob

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are these from a related effort? http://www.thebus.or...p/SystemMap.asp

if so, right on! the older transit map was this weird oblique thing of oahu that i wasn't very fond of.

your posting on this post looks great.

#11
Dennis McClendon

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No, my map will be for a general tourist market. I don't know who does the current TheBus system map. The oblique one was designed by International Mapping and won an ACSM award.
Dennis McClendon, Chicago CartoGraphics
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#12
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EDIT: removed

#13
David Medeiros

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Chicago's weather is nicer than O‘ahu's in summer


I have nothing constructive to add to this discussion other than, no way is that true. But I may be biased ;)

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#14
brentpalmer

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Honolulu has an excellent bus system, but it's not visible to visitors ... so I'm attempting to show the lines with short headways and all-day service, and to show a destination such as the state capitol complex as a single "stop" even though the bus stops may be at various corners for different lines:

Recently I've been trying to design a schematic of the main inner-city bus routes in Brisbane, just showing the corridors with frequent service (every 10-15 minutes or better), over a wide range of times (approx. 6am to 11pm).Unfortunately, I don't have any suitable software to provide samples of my efforts. (The best I can do at this stage is scan some felt-pen scrawls on tracing paper...)

Although stop names would be easier to read at a 45-degree angle, overall your map's excellent. Thumbs up!

#15
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Is there a trick to make smooth parellel curves, such as with the 6, 19, and 20 in your map Dennis? When the 3 lines go into a curve they each bend smoothly and proportionately. I am having trouble with this...I can make the first curve fine, but the 2nd and 3rd curves I have great difficulty with. Is this just something that takes practice or is there a trick?

Example, in this map I put together I can make the Loop pretty easily with 45 degree angles, as they are easy to move. But if I try to do the same thing with curves it gets real sloppy and the curves never match. I am using inkscape by the way, perhaps it's more streamlined in Illustrator.
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