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Determining Surface Area

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#1
Unionboggle

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Greetings all...

I'm glad to have found this site as I have been looking for such a place to ask my question. I've created a number of fictional maps in Adobe Illustrator. What I would like to do is now determine the surface area of these fictional maps (area of the landmasses and oceans, etc..) Is there a way to do this in Illustrator or Photoshop? Or, do I need to start doing the math old fashion way?


Thanks for any help/advice on this topic...


-- Unionboggle

#2
Dennis McClendon

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I just bring it into Photoshop, choose the area with the magic wand or whatever, and have PS count the number of pixels.
Dennis McClendon, Chicago CartoGraphics
chicagocarto.com

#3
MapMedia

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I just bring it into Photoshop, choose the area with the magic wand or whatever, and have PS count the number of pixels.


Right, then to get the actual area, determine what scale your map should be, and assign a unit of measurement for a single pixel (100 sq feet, 0.25 sq miles) then multiply this unit by total pixels in feature.

#4
p-dub

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What about the fictional topography? ;)

#5
Rob

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What about the fictional topography? ;)


you will need to create a fictional scale to complete the area calculations.

#6
p-dub

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What about the fictional topography? ;)


you will need to create a fictional scale to complete the area calculations.


Certainly, but an elevation component essentially creates a 2.5d surface, which will have greater surface area than a 2d surface.

Could this be dealt with in Illustrator/Photoshop?

#7
Rob

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Certainly, but an elevation component essentially creates a 2.5d surface, which will have greater surface area than a 2d surface.


While speaking only for myself, I think all who replied where thinkging that you wanted a planimetric map area method.

2.5D surface area, i'm not familiar with any tools those programs to do this, but by no means am i an expert in them either.

good luck.




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