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#1
LenHoffman

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Hi to all,

First I would like to say thank you to Martin and Hans for all your help with the image problem I was having. Its working now (who would of thought it - one swift kick and the computer got it's act together!!) - lol :P

I am in the process placing the data into the map; however map size is an issue-
we want the whole county to be on one side( in the past the northern most 1/3 of the county was on the back with the remaining 2/3 on the front.)

The printers mentioned that the standard page size for maps that they've done is 27" W x 39.5" L at this size with what we want; the largest scale that I can make the map is 1:95,000 - we would like to get as close to 1:50,000 as possible (map page size for 1:50,000 measures +/- 45" W x 50" L ).

Since I don't make standard maps for publishing on the norm I was hoping that some of the Pros here could give some suggestions and or ideas on how to approch this.

Is a 45"W x 50" L road map to large for the everyday user?

Thanks,
Len

#2
loximuthal

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I don't know off-hand what the standard size of road-maps is, but 45"x50" does seem rather large. All the maps we produce here are either 11"x17" (printed on standard laster PS printers) or 36"x42" (on 36" roll HP plotters). The large maps we do strike me as about the size of most road maps, and I can't imagine it would be very easy to manipulate a map much bigger than that.

'Fraid I don't have much in the way of constructive ideas :(
Andy McIntire
US Census Bureau

#3
Hans van der Maarel

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I think everything larger than a standard, open newspaper is too cumbersome for use as a road map, unless you come up with some really fancy folding methods.

One of my clients is using a 42" wide HP plotter and their maps run about 42x50", which is already rather difficult in use. Similar problem though, they wanted the entire city at 1:12500 scale on a single sheet...
Hans van der Maarel - Cartotalk Editor
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#4
Mike H

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45 x 50 is definately big - you didn't define your audience (in this post) but off-hand imagine using that to navigate in a Honda Civic. I've done a few maps at 30 x 40, and the size was partly justified because the map was expected to be hung on a wall as well. Some of those titles have been made smaller in future editions specifically to aid the user in the field.

If you expect the user to read that in a car, one approach is to work with a printer who can do an accordian fold (also referred to as a Michelin fold) which makes it a bit more friendly. Any other fold will be virtually impossible to re-fold. The bindery capabilities of printers may limit your choices too.

But overall, that size is user-hostile. You're getting into interpretive media size, such as museum displays: step away from inches and think of it in feet : roughly 4 x 4.

You'll also have increased print costs, and a narrow realm of printers to work with.

To retain the scale you could consider a 2 map series?

m.
Michael Hermann
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#5
Martin Gamache

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Len,

28 x 40 is a standard Web offset press size in the US. With the space for gripping and trim removed it leaves you about 27 x 39.5....There are printers that can go larger, one I have used is Pikes Peak Lithography in Colorado, they specialise in large format, especially maps. They do excellent work and clients include National Geographic and Raven Maps. They are not cheap, but if you need to go big they have the presses and the folding machines to handle it and can do 6+ colors at up to 50" x 70" and they can print on synthetics.

Make sure you go with a printer with lots of experience printing maps at that size, registration is a lot more difficult on big presses and just because a printer has the big equipment does not necessarily mean they can print a job within the tight registration maps need. You may also need a special RIP to handle such large files. In case you do I can recommend some Service bureaus that know how to deal with large map files.

mg

#6
Rick Dey

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Len,

One of the issues you will need to address will be the fold. Many binderies will have folder capabilities limited by the bed size and the number of units in the folder. Increases in those will also increase your costs. Accordian folds will also tend to cost more as that will require more plates in a parallel unit. It's good to get both printer and bindery involved early in your layout process. If you are looking for larger than standard format sheetfed printers (28 x 40) you should contact a regional printer's organization which usually have directories based on capabilities available.

Martin's comment about a printer being familiar with maps is especially true on the really large sheets, paper stretches when going through the press and those outer edges can be a serious problem on the lighter stocks that maps tend to be printed on. Color sequences on the press when printing maps can help with this and they are usually different from the standard sequences that most printers use for standard 4 color process printing.

If a map is to be used in a vehicle those larger "bedsheet" sizes can be a problem to handle also.
Rick Dey

#7
LenHoffman

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Sorry it took so long to answer back.....

All of the responces where great after review we have decided to stick with 27X39.5 as our map size and we are going to split the county in half (north/south)

thanks for all of the replies and insite.

Len

#8
natcase

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Sorry it took so long to answer back.....

All of the responces where great after review we have decided to stick with 27X39.5 as our map size and we are going to split the county in half (north/south)

thanks for all of the replies and insite.

Len



I just ran across what looks like a great resource on printing standards:
"Forms, Folds, and Sizes: All the Details Graphic Designers Need to Know but Can Never Find"

Has anyone else used this?

Nat Case
INCase, LLC

Minneapolis, Minnesota USA
maphead.blogspot.com



#9
CHART

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Sorry it took so long to answer back.....

All of the responces where great after review we have decided to stick with 27X39.5 as our map size and we are going to split the county in half (north/south)

thanks for all of the replies and insite.

Len



I just ran across what looks like a great resource on printing standards:
"Forms, Folds, and Sizes: All the Details Graphic Designers Need to Know but Can Never Find"

Has anyone else used this?


I posted this one a few days back http://www.cartotalk...?showtopic=1392 (not too elaborate)
but the book you reference is worth looking into. Thanks.
Chart




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