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Tsingtao 1914

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#1
Kartograph

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As I was quite nit-pickey (sp?) with polyline´s map, I posted my first published map...so you all may have a shot ...

Regards,

Andreas

Link:
http://de.geocities....an/Tsingtao.jpg

#2
Hans van der Maarel

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Looks good.

I'd probabely combine the legend and the overview map into one 'block' and maybe fiddle a bit with the text placement.
Hans van der Maarel - Cartotalk Editor
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#3
Kartograph

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Thanks.
Actually, I like the legend being detached, but I see your point. It "dissociates" the map.

#4
Nick Springer

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Nice design! I think the colors are well thought out and pleasing. My only comment is about the typography.

Traditionally italics is used for water features, not to mention they are slightly harder to read. I would think about changing all your city names to regular text and use italic for the river names. You already use italics for the Sea and Bay names.

The only other minor point is to maybe make the outline of your railroad symbol a little wider. It's edges are very faint and are broken in some places.

Nick Springer

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Owner: Springer Cartographics LLC


#5
Nick Springer

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Sorry, one other point: you don't explain the red and green area colors on the inset map ("Tokyo" and "Seoul" are a little hard to read as well).

Nick Springer

Director of Design and Web Applications: ALK Technologies Inc.
Owner: Springer Cartographics LLC


#6
Kartograph

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Thanks for your input. Sadly, I have lost the Vector file to this one, so I can´t correct it in short time.

@typography: This Map was done for an institurion which has it´s own rules for formatting place names. So I had no choice. I would prefer it the way nspringer suggested it.

@railroad: I know. It´s a mistake I wasn´t able to correct, because I had to make the map in one and a half day (including the whole process from research place names, scanning, data conversion,etc) then it went to print. So that´s the way it was published.

@ colours in smaller map: This is absolutely right, no explanation is bad. The original colour was lighter so the text was readible. The jpg conversion changed it to a darker tone. Which brings me to another question:

How do I get more control over how colours will look like after a conversion into raster images ?
Does using RGB from the start help if I want to do a screen map ?
Usually I use CYMK because it helps printing.

Regards,

Andreas

#7
ELeFevre

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Kartograph,

I think you did a really great job with this map! I never would have guessed that you created it such a short time. I agree with Nick, the colors you used are pleasing. The only suggestions I would make have already been covered by everyone else... Good job.


"How do I get more control over how colours will look like after a conversion into raster images ? Does using RGB from the start help if I want to do a screen map?"

I'm guessing Nick or Hans probably knows the answer here, but since I am responding I will give it a shot. I would *assume that if your designing for on- screen viewing only, you would want to start designing in RGB rather than CMYK. Anyone else?


Erin



#8
Hans van der Maarel

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Yes, if you know it's going to be for on-screen stuff, use RGB right from the start. If possible, maybe even use the websafe palette. Both Illustrator and Freehand offer this.

If you're working for print, go with CMYK, but if you want full control, check some proof prints first. Different printers, even if they're from the same manufacturer, have very different perceptions of color.

Either use Pantone colors or if at all possible print a stack of color swatches yourself, on the printer and paper you'll be using.

Getting the right color is difficult and I've seen many maps end up bad because the color output was lousy.
Hans van der Maarel - Cartotalk Editor
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#9
Nick Springer

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Hans is right to start with RGB for on screen design, although the only point I'll make is that only about 4% of people still use 8-bit (256) color, so it's not necessary to restrict yourself to the web-safe palette.

Nick Springer

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Owner: Springer Cartographics LLC


#10
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Good morning!

I looked at your map and really like it's clean and crisp design. I do have one suggestion however, regarding what I believe are river names.


Wei ho and Dagu ho, I would move to the other side of the blue line. Kiau ho I would leave on the right side of the feature, but flip it so it reads from top to bottom.

Well done!

Lori King. :)

#11
Kartograph

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Thank you !
Regarding the placing of names: Does anybody have a good literature reference for that ? The basics are repeated in most textbooks, but specific examples are very rare. I once got hold of a compilation of rules, but trying to follow all of them drove me nearly insane, so I kept doing it "the way I feel", which obviously isn´t the best way...

@nspringer: I looked up the map in the magazine it was made for: the edges of the railroad were thickened by the layouter before printing. So my mistake was corrected by someone who is not even a cartographer...what a shame :unsure: ...more reasons for getting better.

@colour tips: OK that´s what I know too, but thank you for your answers. At least now I can be sure that colours are difficult and there is nothing to change that in the near future. At least if you try to make a map for both the Internet and offset printing.

Regards Andreas

#12
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As part of my work, I have been involved in compiling cartographic guidelines for our organization which has a fairly heavy GIS component. This equates to a lot of people making maps that aren't really the best cartographic products.

In my research, I haven't come across a whole lot about text placement besides what is in my textbooks. Conventions (i.e. water=italic) are only mentioned briefly. In school (back in the days of manual cartography!) we spent a good bit of time on text placement and were marked with great expectations from our instructor. Asking yourself "how it feels" is not a bad question.

I am also putting together a Basic Cartography course for our staff and actually included that in the design section on text. The question I pose is, if it doesn't feel comfortable to read then perhaps it is not the best choice for placement. Many people rely on the software defaults and I would prefer they ask themselves that question before accepting the default. With a bit of education behind you it is not an invalid question.

Cheers! :P




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