Jump to content

 
Photo

Career Question

- - - - -

  • Please log in to reply
3 replies to this topic

#1
Robert E

Robert E

    Newbie

  • New Member
  • Pip
  • 2 posts
  • No Country Selected

With a 10 yr background in photogrammetery and 7 yrs in IT, how hard would it be to move into GIS? what kind of training would I need.

#2
paul

paul

    Key Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 75 posts
  • Location:Logan, UT
  • Interests:Running, telemark skiing, GIS
  • United States

With a 10 yr background in photogrammetery and 7 yrs in IT, how hard would it be to move into GIS? what kind of training would I need.


I would think it would be a fairly seamless transition. You already have a desirable skill-set, with IT/databases/web and photogrammetry/RS. Do you already have some GIS experience, or are you starting from scratch?

I think you need an opportunity more than you need training. Most GIS skills are picked up on the job, and whatever formal classes you take will quickly become obsolete in a few years. I do GIS full-time, and took a whopping total of two classes as a geology grad student in support of my thesis. Turned out I couldn't get a job in geology, but was able to find work as a GIS Specialist, which is what I've done full-time for the last 5+ years (and love it). But it's not with command-line Arc/INFO or UNIX, which is what I learned on.

If you know projections, you are halfway there. If you know a programming language, you are immediately valuable to a GIS shop. If you know databases, SQL, and website development (which I'm sure you do), you are immediately valuable to a GIS shop. If you are a fast learner and a creative problem-solver, and can demonstrate that, then you already have the number one asset for doing GIS.

If you are starting from scratch, there are a few options. A college course would be nice, but may not be available, depending on where you live. One class is probably sufficient, if you are diligent and serious about learning on your own. In lieu of a nearby college, you could also try the GISP mentoring program. This program would pair you with a certified GIS professional, and he or she would mentor you for six months. It would also help with job networking.

http://www.gisci.org...ng_program.aspx

Something else that would be handy and inexpensive would be buying the GIS Tutorial book by ESRI. It comes with a 180-day evaluation copy of ArcGIS 9.2, so you can work through the exercises and getting some experience driving ArcGIS from your own computer.

http://www.amazon.co...d...4769&sr=1-2

"Getting to Know ArcGIS Desktop" would also be a good book to pick up, and it comes with a trial version of ArcGIS as well.

#3
Robert E

Robert E

    Newbie

  • New Member
  • Pip
  • 2 posts
  • No Country Selected

Other than collecting information from a stereo plotter, I really don't have any expierence in GIS. Currently I am a software developer with SQL experience. I really liked the industry and I want to get back into it.

Thank you very much for your time.

#4
David T

David T

    GIS Manager, USMC, MCIWEST-MCB Camp Pendleton

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 192 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:San Diego, California
  • United States

Other than collecting information from a stereo plotter, I really don't have any expierence in GIS. Currently I am a software developer with SQL experience. I really liked the industry and I want to get back into it.

Thank you very much for your time.


With a SQL background, I'd encourage you to dive into SDE administration. SDE Administrators with a good understanding of SQL can be hard to come by.
David Toney, GISP
GIS Manager
United States Marine Corps
West Coast Installations




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

-->