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Cherokee Nation Landform

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#1
razornole

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Hello all,

I always seem to get valuable comments to help tweak my maps, so I thought I would post my next one. Attached is a landform map of the Cherokee Nation. This is the reference map for series of thematic maps where I will be mapping the Cherokee language per census designated places. My target audience is the Cherokee nation elders who are working on a solution to preserve their dying language. The purpose of this map is to only show the landforms, rivers, lakes, along with the extent of the Cherokee Nation. Cities/towns will be covered on other maps. I included elevation, but that was not really a priority with my client.

Programs include: ArcMAP, Illy, and Photoshop.

Thanks,
kru

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"Ah, to see the world with the eyes of the gods is geography--to know cities and tribes, mountains and rivers, earth and sea, this is our gift."
Strabo 22AD

#2
mikeb226

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Nice colors!

Although you said the elevation was not a priority, it helps define the hilly landforms.

Is this for print or on the web?

I wonder of the light colored borders are too light for print.

Also - throw a container border around the entire map. It will help make it more defined

#3
François Goulet

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The elevation's color ramp is quite subtle so it works for me.

It's clear and simple. The name on the Cherokee Nation's Area are maybe a little light. It's not always easy to read, but it could be my screen.

Good work!

#4
eli

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hi kru,
It's a lovely map, I wonder if you would consider posting it (or the series!) in the Aboriginal Mapping Network map gallery? The map gallery could certainly use some examples of excellent cartographic work.

Your text hierarchy seems kinda funny vis-à-vis the state names and names of the mountains range, plateau and cross timbers (what is cross timbers?). They seem to be the most important feature on the page, while the rivers and lakes fall back.

Also, what is that line across Oologah Lake?

Good job.

#5
razornole

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Nice colors!

Although you said the elevation was not a priority, it helps define the hilly landforms.

Is this for print or on the web?

I wonder of the light colored borders are too light for print.

Also - throw a container border around the entire map. It will help make it more defined

I guess what I meant with elevation is that I am not going to show isohypse lines. The hillshade and DEM is pivotal to show the terrain and I feel it is sufficient.

This is for both; print and powerpoint. Later I will have to size it and convert to B&W for a journal article, but that's another job entirely.

It prints exactly how I want with my color management system. I want the linework outside the Cherokee Nation to almost disappear (short of the state borders, but I have already reduced their color to blend more with the background).

The use of neatlines is not really my style. To me they distract/compete with, in this case, the Cherokee Nation. Thanks for the suggestion though.

Thanks for the comments.
kru
"Ah, to see the world with the eyes of the gods is geography--to know cities and tribes, mountains and rivers, earth and sea, this is our gift."
Strabo 22AD

#6
Charles Syrett

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I like the look of this map, except......is there any particular reason why you use Arial? Can you substitute Helvetica? :)
http://www.ms-studio.com/articles.html

Charles Syrett
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http://www.mapgraphics.com

#7
razornole

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I like the look of this map, except......is there any particular reason why you use Arial? Can you substitute Helvetica? :)
http://www.ms-studio.com/articles.html

Charles Syrett
Map Graphics
http://www.mapgraphics.com

My simple answer is because of other maps in the series (such as the one attached) where space is the main issue. I like my maps to be consistent throughout the series. To the best of my knowledge Arial Narrow can be crammed into the tightest of spaces without messing with the kerning. However, I can't corroborate this with any quantifiable evidence.

Interesting article, admittedly I'm merely a novice when it comes to fonts.

Helvetica is not an option with my pc. Maybe I would have to pay Linotype as well.

kru

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"Ah, to see the world with the eyes of the gods is geography--to know cities and tribes, mountains and rivers, earth and sea, this is our gift."
Strabo 22AD

#8
MapMedia

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Excellent map - I really like the cool and uniform green and subset. The rivers are done nicely too.
Well done!

#9
Hans van der Maarel

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Interesting article, admittedly I'm merely a novice when it comes to fonts.

Helvetica is not an option with my pc. Maybe I would have to pay Linotype as well.


FWIW, I just picked up a subset of the Helvetica family from myfonts.com. 11 styles for $277. Linotype is more expensive.

There's a really great thread on type fonts here that you can check out.
Hans van der Maarel - Cartotalk Editor
Red Geographics
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#10
BioGeoMan

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Great map! One comment I have is that two of the county names (and some of the county lines in the southern portion of the map) can be difficult to read when placed over waterbodies and the lighter portions of the hillshade (e.g. Wagoner and Adair). I also concur that Arial may not be the best choice for the title font.

Other than that, awesome job!!

Michael Scisco

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biogeocreations.com


#11
Dale Sanderson

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...The purpose of this map is to only show the landforms, rivers, lakes, along with the extent of the Cherokee Nation...


Overall I think it's an appealing map - particularly the color choices. One thing that bothers me though, is that the vector hydrology is not exactly registered with the raster relief image. It looks pretty good within the boundaries of the Cherokee Nation, but it becomes more apparent as you move towards the edges of the map. It's most evident in the slivers of Arkansas and Missouri: if you look closely, you can see the streams simply aren't sitting in their valleys.
Dale Sanderson
professionally: cartographics manager for Dex One
personally: cartophile and road-geek (my website)

#12
razornole

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...The purpose of this map is to only show the landforms, rivers, lakes, along with the extent of the Cherokee Nation...


Overall I think it's an appealing map - particularly the color choices. One thing that bothers me though, is that the vector hydrology is not exactly registered with the raster relief image. It looks pretty good within the boundaries of the Cherokee Nation, but it becomes more apparent as you move towards the edges of the map. It's most evident in the slivers of Arkansas and Missouri: if you look closely, you can see the streams simply aren't sitting in their valleys.

Nice catch, I never noticed it. Those are obviously two different elevation models that are layered on each other. I exported both of them from the same scale and doc in arcMap. I just snapped the corners of the clipping mask and thought they should be aligned. Obviously they weren't.

You saved me big just in the nick of time. Now that is corrected, I'm off to meet my client.

Thanks,
kru
"Ah, to see the world with the eyes of the gods is geography--to know cities and tribes, mountains and rivers, earth and sea, this is our gift."
Strabo 22AD

#13
Dennis McClendon

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Looks very nice. Seems odd to not have any cities, not even Tulsa and Muskogee. The two-letter abbreviation for Kansas is KS, though there's room to put the full state names--or at least old-fashioned Ark. and Kan.

But I'm curious why topography--particularly the rather mild topography of Northeastern Oklahoma--is relevant to language at all. These Cherokees are not making their way by moccasin or canoe along the rivers and sloughs in the land of their great-great-grandfathers, they're driving their pickups along US 64 and county section-line roads to work at the ordnance plants and plastics factories in land they came to not quite 200 years ago.
Dennis McClendon, Chicago CartoGraphics
chicagocarto.com

#14
razornole

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Looks very nice. Seems odd to not have any cities, not even Tulsa and Muskogee. The two-letter abbreviation for Kansas is KS, though there's room to put the full state names--or at least old-fashioned Ark. and Kan.

But I'm curious why topography--particularly the rather mild topography of Northeastern Oklahoma--is relevant to language at all. These Cherokees are not making their way by moccasin or canoe along the rivers and sloughs in the land of their great-great-grandfathers, they're driving their pickups along US 64 and county section-line roads to work at the ordnance plants and plastics factories in land they came to not quite 200 years ago.

Thanks, I caught Kansas a while ago, but that info is always helpful in case I didn't.

The easy answer is to your question is that it was the client's request. The longer answer is that my client is ethnobiologist who has a theory of more plant knowledge to in higher elevations. I'm sure that he'll be studying that next and wanted to kill two birds with one stone with this map. i.e. he'll recycle.

kru
"Ah, to see the world with the eyes of the gods is geography--to know cities and tribes, mountains and rivers, earth and sea, this is our gift."
Strabo 22AD




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